Reflections

Reflections
Reflections By Bonnie Hutchinson

By Bonnie Hutchinson
 
Animals are quirkier than I thought
 
Jazz-loving sharks? An attack squirrel? Mindless scrolling took me to two stories that made me realize the animal kingdom is quirkier than I thought.
I like both jazz and classical music, but classical is my favourite. Sharks, on the other hand–or at least one group of baby sharks–appear to prefer jazz.
Scientists at Australia’s Macquarie University Fish Lab trained baby Port Jackson sharks to associate music with reward as part of a study published in the Animal Cognition journal.
The study’s lead author, Catarina Vila-Pouca, explained, “Sound is really important for aquatic animals; it travels well under water (four times faster than it travels in air) and fish use it to find food, hiding places and even to communicate.”
Like other fish, sharks are adept at honing in on sounds. In the experiment, the sharks responded well to food stations that played jazz. However, the sharks under-performed when confronted with classical music.
Associate professor Culum Brown said, “It was obvious that the sharks knew they had to do something different when the classical music was played, but they couldn’t figure out that they had to go to a different location.” Several stories about the experiment also mentioned that different sharks have different personalities.
Sharks have personalities? And respond differently to different kinds of music? Who knew?
***
I was still contemplating sharks with personalities when I read about Joey the crime-fighting squirrel in Idaho. Joey’s life did not begin auspiciously. Soon after he was born, even before his eyes were open, he was abandoned after falling out of his nest. Adam Pearl and his wife Carmen found him and took him in. They bought supplies and set an alarm every two hours to feed him. Joey thrived, and soon had the run of the house, learned to use a litterbox and scavenge from bowls of nuts. He was friendly and would let anyone pet him.
Until–a burglar broke into the Pearl home. When police went to their home to investigate the burglary, Joey introduced himself. A few hours later, police caught a burglary suspect with items from Pearl’s home and scratches on his hands.
The burglar told police a squirrel came flying out of nowhere and kept attacking him until he left.
Joey the crime-fighting squirrel made headlines. But after the burglary, Joey started to get aggressive.
One day when Joey seemed especially rambunctious, Adam Pearl decided to leave a sliding door open. Joey eventually ventured out, played with wild squirrels during the day and returned to his bed indoors at night.
And then one day, Joey climbed on Adam’s shoulder, getting his ears scratched for several minutes, and scampered away, out the door and up a backyard apple tree. He hasn’t been seen since. “I think that was his good-bye, looking back on it,” Adam said. “If I had to guess, he found a girlfriend and they’re off doing their squirrel thing.”
***
One intention of the shark experiments was to demonstrate that sharks are not just mindless instinctive animals. Reading about the experiment had that impact on me, so I guess it fulfilled its purpose with at least one person. Reading about Joey the crime-fighting squirrel made me think about how pets–even those who start as wild animals–will fiercely protect their humans. And how, ultimately (at least for Joey), their wild destiny trumps everything.
So what does this have to do with anything that matters on a spring day in East Central Alberta? Well, I just liked the stories and thought you might too.
But it’s also making me reflect how non-human and human animals have more in common than I realized–personalities and relationships and preferences. And how we must always remember that we too are biological creatures with biological drives and needs, totally dependent on the planet for our physical survival, and that our actions also impact our non-human fellow animals. We’re in this together.
***
If you have comments about this column or suggestions for future topics, send a note to Bonnie@BonnieHutchinson.com.

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Homespun

Homespun
Homespun By Laurel Nadon

By Laurel Nadon

Let the camping begin

Camping season has finally arrived. It’s time to round up the wiener cookers, prepare the motorhome and head into the great outdoors.
This year, as always, we kicked off the season as soon as the weather declared it was time. We typically start off with a campground like Miquelon Lake Provincial Park that is close by, so it is possible to head home if we’ve forgotten something.
We’ve learned to be creative when we are camping. Is there an amphitheatre not in use? When we camped near Mount Robson a few summers ago, we had a day with spitting rain. While my youngest was napping with my husband in the motorhome, I walked with my two older children to the amphitheatre. We spent hours putting on shows together, even one where I was a tree and had two “beavers” gnawing on my trunk! This was all good until two other children arrived on bicycle and watched, spellbound. When we finished, they asked if they could join in. We gave them parts and continued on. Then their grandparents arrived, and sat down on the benches to watch. It was mildly embarrassing, but we still talk with warm nostalgia about that rainy day when we put on show.
Speaking of weather, we like to choose our campgrounds based on what the weather will be. If it’s going to be hot, then I need to be swimming and all lakes with blue green algae blooms and other problems are out.
We try to keep in mind that children who don’t need a nap at home might still need a nap, while camping to make up for the later nights. (I think this is my husband’s favourite part of the day). Otherwise, at 5:40 p.m. precisely, our four-year-old will Hit The Wall, which is what happened on our first camping jaunt the first weekend of May this year. (I used this expression just the other night at home when our littlest was obviously ready for bed and then overheard our daughter telling our other son, “No, he didn’t actually hit a wall!”)
Lots of people think that May long weekend marks the beginning of camping season, and I disagree. Two years ago, the hottest weekends of the season were the last two in April! As soon as it is still warmish at night, we start off the season, even if it means we haven’t filled the water tanks yet and bring a blue jug along instead. The shoulder seasons (May and September) might even be my favourite times to camp. In May, the weather isn’t too hot, there aren’t any bugs yet, the campgrounds are practically empty, and you don’t need to worry about a reservation. In September, campgrounds are also less full and the leaves are beautiful.
It’s important, especially when figuring out how to camp with young children, to know when to abandon camp! Once when camping in our back pasture in our camper van before we expanded to a motorhome, our youngest woke up in the playpen when our older children needed help getting down from their sleeping loft to go to the bathroom. He hung onto the top of the playpen and watched us like a little gopher, and with no way to prevent him from seeing us, he refused to go back to sleep. When my parents woke up the next morning, we were gone, having evacuated in the night.
Another time on the first camp of the season, we went to bed with our friends in the campsite next door and woke up to find it empty. It turned out that their two-year-old had awakened at about 2 a.m. and decided that it was morning. By 4 a.m. they were eating breakfast, and by 5 a.m. they had packed up and headed home. Figuring out how to get those little rug rats to bed and stay in bed can be challenging, but then you suddenly arrive at this blissful time of life where you are playing bocce ball in the sun with your whole family and you think, this makes it all worthwhile. Start when they are young, and they will crave the quiet and exercise, finding little critters, and eating sticky s’mores around the campfire.
When we are at home, we always find more weeding, mowing, landscaping, and projects that need to be done. It’s when we make it a priority to pack up and get camping on a regular basis that we find our rhythm as a family. Load up, kids!

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Jaywalkers' takes over downtown Camrose

By Lori Larsen

The countdown is on for the 61st Annual Jaywalkers’ Jamboree and the excitement that accompanies it in downtown Camrose from Friday, June 1 until Sunday, June 3.
This year’s Mardi Gras theme, brings with it all the colour, pageantry, noise, thrills and fun of a street party. As always attendees are encouraged to dress the part and join in on the party by coming in their best Mardi Gras ensemble.
There will be loads of entertainment including singers, dancers and bands on both the Main Stage (50 Avenue and 51 Street) and Centre Stage (in front of Twig), as well as street busters and two shows featured at the Bailey Theatre on June 1, Echo Nebraska and June 2, HYSTERIA of Def Leppard with Godfrey Blaque.
For children of all ages West Coast Amusements will once again be featuring midway rides and games.
The Mirror Lake Express will be tooting its way around offering train rides at the Mirror Lake Arbour.
Food, glorious food. Jaywalker’s doesn’t disappoint when it comes to eats, with everything from sweet sugary mini doughnuts to buttery savory corn on the cob, all the old time favourites hamburgers and hotdogs to some new and inviting ethnic delicacies.
Amidst all the excitement of one of the longest standing street fairs attendees will be able to shop the downtown Camrose businesses enjoying a variety of unique boutiques  and stores and friendly down-home service.
In support of good causes, local service clubs will be holding fundraisers and raffles.
Bring the family down and enjoy a day of fun for everyone.
Tickets for the midway can be purchased at the Chamber of Commerce.
For more information contact the Camrose and District Chamber of Commerce at 780-672-4217.

Summer program coordinator

By Lori Larsen

The Camrose Wildlife and Greenspace Stewardship summer program is about to kick off its season with the newly hired coordinator Carolyn Cook at the helm.
Carolyn hails from New Sarepta and just completed her second year at University of Alberta Augustana Campus, as an Environmental Science major.  “The professor I had for one of my university classes was Glen Hvenegaard and I am working with him on a lot of these projects, he had posted this job position in our class.”
Cook wanted to apply for positions that were more relative to her degree. “This position has a little bit of the interpretation which I am interested in and also has more focus on wildlife which I am very passionate about.”
Having completed several courses on zoology with a focus towards ecology, Cook has the technical background to enhance the position as Wildlife and Greenspace coordinator, but she is also very  interested in interacting with people.
“I like doing the field work but also like interacting with people.”
“It’s very important that we educate our children on the environment because they are going to be living in it for their entire life,” said Cook. “It is important for them to know where their food comes from and all the different interactions they have with animals in order to a live a more healthy, responsible and environmentally aware life.”
Cook said the lineup for the summer program, at this point, is still being planned but did indicate a few events that have been solidified.
“The Purple Martin Festival will take place on June 16.”
Guest speakers will be Corey Scobie, the Assistant Curator of Ornithology at the Royal Alberta Museum, and Don Delaney, a professional wildlife photographer.
“Another event we hope to do is tree planting working with different groups of children on how to plant trees.”
Cook added that throughout the summer the Wildlife and Greenspace Stewardship program  will be hosting nature walks and interpretations featuring the Stoney Creek area and Jubilee Park. “We are also going to be working with the Beaverhill Bird Observatory and the Battle River Watershed Alliance on a couple events.”
The majority of the events will be taking place at the Stoney Creek Centre located at 5320-39 Avenue. The events will begin on Thursday, May 31 and conclude on Aug. 2.
For more information on the Wildlife and Greenspace Stewardship program contact Carolyn Cook at 780-672-0544.

BRCF feeds the hungry through Flagstaff Food Bank

The Battle River Community Foundation awarded grants to the Flagstaff Food Bank. The grants fund part of the cost of operating the Food Bank which supports residents of Flagstaff County and the municipalities within it.
The grant is from income from the Bricker Drever Fund, the Flagstaff Fund, the Jean and Leo Vos Fund, the Martha and Gene Waldorf fund and the Foundation’s Community Fund.
The Battle River Community Foundation exists to support projects, programs and facilities, such as this in East Central Alberta, which benefit the local communities and have a positive impact on the future.
Grants from the Battle River Community Foundation are primarily made possible through the generosity of individual donors and organizations that have created endowment funds. The principle of these endowment funds is kept intact and the income is made available annually to support local projects and organizations.
Since it was founded in 1995, the Battle River Community Foundation has granted over $5,445,000 to support community programs like the Flagstaff Food Bank.
To learn more about the Flagstaff Food Bank, contact Diane Gordon at 780-385-2419.
To learn more about the Battle River Community Foundation contact Dana Andreassen, executive director, at 780-679-0449.

Nightly routine can help deter theft of property

By Lori Larsen

With the warmer weather officially making its return criminal opportunity may increase so residents need be vigilant in protecting their property.
The seventh in a series of Eyes on Camrose community involved initiatives is Nightly at Nine.
“We are encouraging the community to get into a routine of ensuring that their property is locked every night at 9 p.m. Thieves prey on unlocked property and by developing a routine where everyone locks their vehicles, bikes, sheds, garages and homes, will help deter crime,” explained Camrose Police Service crime prevention/community relations Constable Kelly Bauer.
“We need to develop the habit of locking our property. I don’t know how many times I have spoken to victims of a theft who indicated ‘I usually lock up but I guess I forgot.’”
Set the alarm on your phone, watch or clock for 9 p.m., as a reminder to get out and check to ensure your property is secure.
“Go one step further and develop a relationship with your next door neighbours to ensure their property is also secure.
“Thefts range in severity, but regardless of the value of the property it still leaves the person feeling victimized. With warmer temperatures we typically see an increase in the number of theft occurrences. Each of us should develop the habit of locking our property…Nightly at Nine.”
Previous initiatives
Camrose Police Service “Eyes on Camrose” community awareness program offers a number of different initiatives for residents to become active members in helping to reduce crime in Camrose.
“Citizens recognize that everyone can play a part in keeping our community safe,” said Const. Bauer. “There are many different ways that people can be involved.”
The first Eyes in Camrose initiative is Citizens on Patrol, a program designed to have residents patrolling the streets of Camrose reporting any suspicious activity to the police. For more information or if you are interested in becoming a COP email Camrosecops@gmail.com.
As a second initiative Camrose Police Service (CPS)encourages residents to use social media to stay informed and get involved from a distance. Follow the CPS Facebook page and Twitter account.
The third initiative, Curb the Danger, has motorists calling 911 if they suspect an impaired driver. With the majority of people owning a cell phone, there is so much potential to keep the streets safe. Remember do not use your cellular device while driving. Pull over and park the vehicle or have a passenger make the call.
Initiative four is simple and yet very effective, Lock It of Lose It. “The police all too frequently respond to calls regarding stolen property that could have been prevented if the property had been secured,” noted Bauer.
Initiative five is the Security Camera Registry Program. CPS suggests businesses and home owners with exterior security cameras to register their system with the police. Your camera information will be put onto the CPS database in the event there is a crime in your area.
Initiative six has businesses looking out for each other with the Camrose Business Watch. Businesses are encouraged to share information about what type of crime is occurring that affects the business community, such as counterfeit bank notes, fraud, or shoplifters. By sharing that information you could  prevent others from falling victim to the same crime.
Eyes on Camrose is creating many extra eyes throughout our community that are assisting the police service and looking out for each other.

Camrose Comp graduates shine among the stars

Camrose Comp graduates shine among the stars
Graduate Abby Fowler parades down the aisle during the ECCHS Spring Exercises processional.

By Lori Larsen

The École Camrose Composite High School graduating class of 2018 crossed the stage shining like stars in front of record breaking crowds, during the Spring Exercises held on May 4 at the Camrose Regional Exhibition.
With the theme “Among the Stars” the students shone bright decked out in their finery moving toward their futures after high school.
ECCHS principal Todd Sieben began with opening comments searching for words of wisdom for the graduates. “I simply want to wish you happiness and success, and realize that may look different for each of you and come in different forms. Your journey is unique for you.” He concluded by sharing the seven most productive traits.
Coordinators of ceremonies, students, Laken Biletski, Nicholas Ioanidis and Lyndi Tanaschyk kicked off the afternoon with a little humour when Nicholas arrived fashionably late on an adult tricycle.
Following invocation by Mr. Dean Rostad greetings were given on behalf of Battle River School Division Valerie Sims and acknowledgement of the graduates, parents and ECCHS staff. “Graduates, you have been given a foundation of learning that will get you on the road to the future. The path you will take from here will be different as you pursue your own passions and your own dreams.”
In a tribute to friends, by students Taylor Markovich and Jordyn Auerbach thanked all the friends for the continual support and memories throughout the school years.
Attributing staff for all their hard work and dedication were students Bhey Pastolero, Tyler Bergstrom and Keianna Greene.
“Thank you for being approachable relatable people and taking the time to get to know us,” said Bergstrom.
Responding to the tribute to staff were Tina Olson and Carl Davidse.
Students Emily Flint and James Rostad paid special tribute to the parents of all the grads in a way befitting high school grads, with a little humour and a lot of sincere gratitude. “I will do my best to remember the sacrifices you have made to shape us into the people we have become,” said Flint.
Responding to the tribute to parents were Jennifer Shields and Dean Rostad.
Guest speaker for the evening was CCHS social studies teacher Greg Barclay.
Class of 2018 valedictorian was Andrew Hohm.
At the completion of the formal ceremonies graduates took to the stage and were presented their certificates by principal Todd Sieben, vice-principal Caroline Simonson and Craig Dimond.
The 2018 École Camrose Composite High School graduating class chose wisely when selecting ECCHS social studies teacher Greg Barclay for the guest speaker of the Spring Exercises. Barclay’s message to the graduates and guests was to look hard to see the shining star in everyone and be your own shining star. “I was honoured to be  chosen to speak for tonight’s occasion,” began Barclay.
In keeping with the theme for the ceremony, he related gazing at the night stars and how not all stars are easily seen.  “Not every star stands out from the rest some are too far away, sometimes it is cloudy, some are obscured from our view because of the brilliance of others which makes them harder to see and sometimes we have to be told what to look for.
“My job is dealing with people but when we think about it people are a lot like stars. Not everyone stands out or is easy to see sometimes we have to look for them. Maybe that brilliance we are trying to find is too far away. We don’t always think about the amazing attributes people have when they aren’t immediately apparent.”
He continued by saying that, like finding those less obvious stars, we sometimes need help finding the standouts, talents and amazing qualities a person has that may be hidden. “Once we can sweep away some of the obstacles to our view we can begin to see the stars.”
In reference to the students of ECCHS he said there are amazing singers and actors, first rate athletes, future mechanics, nurses, doctors and business people. “What does the future hold for these bright young people–stars.”
 He related that this generation will have concerns about the impact of modernization or technology on their futures.
“What future will they (graduates) imagine. A future where the gap between rich and poor becomes so great that a new form of feudalism emerges. Or will they imagine a future where people take care of each other.
“Today’s graduates will confront issues that my generation could not have dreamed about. I will not solve the problems of the future, this generation will. They will solve the problems of the day when they take Stephen Hawking’s advice to look up at the stars and not down at your feet. Try to make sense of what you see and wonder about what makes the universe exist. Be curious. They will need to dream and think about things my generation never had to and they will need to soar above the complacency of common place to reach beyond the unremarkable and dream.”
On a final note Barclay left the graduating class with a thought-provoking  piece of advise.
“Always remember you have within you the strength, patience and passion to rea
The 2018 École Camrose Composite High School (ECCHS) valedictorian, Andrew Hohm gave a thought provoking speech during the Spring Exercises held on May 11 at the Camrose Regional Exhibition.
 Hohm began by acknowledging teachers, friends and community members and in his words, most importantly parents.
“Our time here was definitely made worth while by all the friends and memories we have made. This school has been a blessing to all of us and as much as we want to get out of here as fast as possible we will all miss it soon.”
Hohm paid tribute to the programs offered at ECCHS including sports, music, skills,  arts and the French Immersion program. “This school has something to fit every students’ needs and has helped us all to achieve our best.
“When I thought about our theme “Among the Stars” I realized how well it fits our class. Every single person here today is a star in their own way and we all shine brightly. Stars are all beautiful on their own but when we look at them as constellations we see a bigger picture and they become all the more impressive. Alone we are all bright individuals but collectively we can be so much more.
Using another metaphor, Hohm, spoke about seeing the sun as the most influential star in the galaxy needed to sustain life. “Interestingly enough the sun  is one of the smallest star known to man. To relate this, even the seemingly least important people can make the important contributions and change the world to be a better place.
“So even if you are not the biggest star around, never underestimate your importance and the contributions you can make in this world.”
Hohm concluded by relating a quote from President Theodore Roosevelt of keeping your eyes to the stars and feet on the ground. “This reinforces the balance in life and balance in life means we are accomplishing things but also setting our sites on greater things and shining among the stars.”ch for the stars and change the world. You are the stars, to shine in your own way and shine.

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County proposed conditions to pool project contribution

By Lori Larsen

In response to a letter sent to the City of Camrose from Camrose County regarding the request for a capital contribution of $2.64 million towards the proposed aquatic facility project, a motion was made by councilor Wayne Throndson, seconded by councilor Greg Wood that the City is unable to accept the proposed capital contribution to the new swimming pool with the conditions attached (from the County).
Further to the motion council instructed administration to continue to work on the operational figures of the City recreational facilities to be presented to Camrose County at a future meeting of the recreational committees.
The letter sent to the City by the County on Feb. 15 included the motion that Camrose County council provide $2.64 million in capital funding to support the Aquatic Centre Expansion and Modernization project, as requested by the City. The capital contribution to the project would be funded on the provision that the City of Camrose agreed to enter into a new recreation memorandum of understanding with funding based on an annual percentage of the total County taxable assessments.
In response to this letter the City took the matter to the City/County Intermunicipal Committee meeting on March 1 at which point it was suggested the topic be addressed to the County’s recreation committee. After the formation of a City of Camrose recreation committee on March 5, attempts were made to organize a meeting with both the City recreation committee and the County recreation committee, but no collaborating dates could be arranged.
The County further discussed the matter of the capital contribution to the Aquatic Centre Expansion and Modernization Project during a March 13 county council meeting resulting in another letter, dated March 16, sent to the City.
The letter stated, “After council discussion I have, by resolution, been requested to send a letter to the City council indicating that the capital contribution of $2.64 million, to the Aquatic Centre Expansion and Modernization Project, and the associated recreation agreement are non-negotiable.
“Council believes that tying the capital funding to the pool and a new recreation agreement allows both the pool project and ongoing support for recreation facilities accessed by County residents to move forward in a cooperative matter.
“County council has reviewed the numbers associated with the new recreation agreement and believes them to be fair and equitable based on funding provided to the City over the past six years.
“By moving to an agreement based on a percentage of assessment, the County has some budget assurance and does not run the risk of getting caught in a significant increase based on the deficit situation as occurred this year with an approximate $100,000 increase in funding required. Moving to a fixed percentage of assessment will allow the County to remove significant fluctuations in funding requests and identify recreation funding on our tax notice, so ratepayers know exactly what recreation is costing.”
During a regular city council meeting held on April 16, councilor Wayne Throndson indicated reasons why the City would not be accepting the proposal regarding the Aquatic Centre Expansion and Modernization Project from the County. “It was contingent upon our agreement to a new recreational facility agreement that would essentially cap their contribution to our recreational facilities at $300,000, which would then go up in accordance with increased assessment with the county.
“I can understand the desire of the county to come up with a formula that provides certainty and their idea that it would be tied to their tax assessment, and from our committee level we recognize there was some logic to that so there weren’t hills and valleys in terms of what we were asking for on an annual basis.
“The difficulty with the motion that came to us from the county is that the starting number of $300,000 by initial calculations when you compare, is too low, it is not sufficient. By tying ourselves to a 10 year agreement using that as our starting point, that presented significant risk to the city and was probably an undercontribution by the county to our recreational facilities.
“I think the motion made to us by the county requires a motion back from us in response.”
A letter containing the motion was sent from City administration to the County on April 18. A meeting with both the City and County recreation committees to further discuss the matter, was set for May 14.

Junior high students soar with Peter Pan

Junior high students soar with Peter Pan
PETER PAN JR. Peter Pan Jr. cast members, from left, Celeste Wilson as Captain Hook, Rena Warren as Michael, Marissa de Hoog as Wendy, Taylor Brady as Peter Pan, Trinity Grant as John and Meadow Haugen as Tinker Bell, work on their lines for the upcoming play on May 28
and 29 at the Jeanne and Peter Lougheed Performing Arts Centre. The École Charlie Killam School students will be staging two shows for students and two more for parents and 
community members.

By Murray Green

You can fly away to Neverland with Peter and the Darling children in this adaptation of Disney’s classic animated film.
Ecole Charlie Killam School teachers Sabrina Heydorn and Rhonda Basque are guiding a junior high cast to bring back the memories of the hit show on May 28 and 29.
Based on the Disney film and J.M. Barrie’s enchanting play, Disney’s Peter Pan Jr. is a modern version of the timeless tale about a boy who wouldn’t grow up … with no flying required. The score includes new arrangements of classic Disney songs and a story featuring one rousing adventure after another.
“We were excited to try something a little bit different,” said Heydorn.
“After doing Lion King and Beauty and the Beast, we wanted to do something less known to the students,” added Basque.
Wendy Darling loves to tell stories to her brothers, Michael and John. But when her father announces she must move out of the nursery, Peter Pan comes to visit the children and whisks them away to Neverland. Their journey introduces them to the lost boys, mermaids, Indians and even the infamous pirate, Captain Hook. It’s Peter to the rescue when Wendy is taken captive by the dreaded captain, who has his own sinister plans for the hero.
The ÉCKS cast consists of 28 students ranging from Grade 6 to 8. “We got a ton of people wanting to be involved, both this year and last year, so we went with a show with a bigger cast,” said Heydorn.
Disney’s Peter Pan Jr. is a magical story with countless opportunities for clever staging and design, and large ensemble numbers featuring cliques of classic characters.
“We have a variety of roles, some larger and some shorter, but that is what the students want. They want a choice of how involved they want to be,” said Basque. “It depends on how courageous they want to be.”
Tinker Bell and her fellow fairies introduce the audience to the story. The Darling children play make-believe in their nursery, imaging themselves in Neverland. “I find the music part a challenge, but Mr. (Bob) Bailey helps us out with that. We also have students from the high school that come over to help us as well,” explained Basque. “It’s not just the two of us, it is a whole bunch of people that contribute. We have the cosmetology class at the high school helping us with make-up this year, so it is a big partnership.”
Teachers and staff members are also assisting with set design. “It (Peter Pan Jr.) is a big endeavour and it takes a lot of hands. We have been preparing since the end of September,” shared Basque.
The drama department is having four shows this year. Each day will have a matinee for other students and 7 p.m. evening shows for parents and guests.
“The students are so great to work with,” shared Heydorn. “Its lovely to see how many students we do have involved. We have about half of the cast in Grade 8 and I’m excited they are moving on to ÉCCHS next year,” said Heydorn.

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Jack and the Beanstalk presented at Lougheed

By Murray Green

AboutTime Productions and Alberta Opera Touring Association will be bringing Jack and the Beanstalk to life at the Jeanne and Peter Lougheed Performing Arts Centre on Friday, May 25 at 7 p.m.
This performance is by Alberta Opera professional members and was brought to Camrose based on Ethan Snowden’s connection to Camrose.
“Ethan, who plays the part of Jack, is my first student to become a professional musical theatre performer, so I wanted to bring the show here. Originally, the show wasn’t coming here,” said AboutTime founder Cathie Johnson. “I’ve had other students that have gone on to theatrical or artistic avenues, but he is the first professional performer.”
Ethan joined ATP in 2011 to audition for Back to the ‘80s and was given the lead role. He also was in Once Upon a Mattress and Suesical the Musical; all three shows were when ATP was at the Bailey Theatre.
“I remember, he joined us from Millet as a Grade 10 student in Wetaskiwin. He found out about our program through one of the instructors. He came in to audition for Back to the Future, but we were doing Back to the ‘80s and he came in on the kids’ day, rather than the teenage day. So, he saw a bunch of young girls and walked right out. My mother grabbed him and told him that he was in the right place. The rest is history,” she explained.
“He came here pretty talented. He had zero training, he just needed to be grounded. Polishing, that is really all I had to do – teach him the basics and work ethic. We called him our Disney kid from the moment we saw him. From the moment he auditioned, we went wow. I knew that he was going to be someone special for us. With Ethan, I just knew. After three years, he went to MacEwan University and expanded on the things he was taught here. They just go into more detail,” said Cathie.
“Now he lives in Bashaw and is still from the area. We are hoping that he will help us teach some classes at AboutTime in the future. He is the type of person who will teach right down with you. We have had a lot of good teachers, but having a professional like Ethan to help us teach would be extra special for us.”
Seven local students will be selected to join the cast of Jack and the Beanstalk. “We are going to hold a raffle, so everyone has a chance to land one of the spots,” said Cathie.
“This is a family show and we have priced it to allow families to go. We could have made this a fundraiser, but we wanted families to watch this show.”
This old tale is still a hit for young and young at heart. Join Jack as he lives with his mother on a fledgling bean farm.
He fills his day with imaginary tales of fantastic adventures to combat the despair and boredom. However, one day, forced to trade their beloved family cow for food, Jack meets a mysterious merchant on the way to market and is whisked away on an epic journey of his own.
Jack dangles from a monstrous beanstalk miles from the ground, discovers the vast riches of an enormous castle above the clouds and befriends a most unusual individual: a giant. But when Jacks steals the giant’s most prized possession, a beautiful singing harp, he’s faced with a difficult choice that tests the extent of his courage.

Re-live music of Louisiana Hayride Show

By Murray Green

Close your eyes and think back in time when listening to great music meant turning on the radio and just listening.
No cell phone or television, just good country music coming out of the wooden music box.
You can join the cast of the Louisiana Hayride Show in this wonderful celebration of the best country and rockabilly hits from the ‘50s, ‘60s and ‘70s as they pay tribute to the historical radio program, The Louisiana Hayride.
A radio type of show will be held at the Jeanne and Peter Lougheed Performing Arts Centre on Thursday, May 31 beginning at 7:30 p.m.
Listen to music made famous by Elvis Presley, Patsy Cline, Roy Orbison, Lefty Frizzell and Loretta Lynn come to life on stage. You’ll think you’re listening to the great artists themselves in concert when you hear the tribute artists sing their hit songs.
In addition to these tribute artists, you’ll also enjoy music by the ‘greats’ such as Johnny Cash, Jerry Lee Lewis, Buck Owens, Roger Miller and Marty Robbins.
Take a trip down memory lane with this unique show as you listen to old favourites.
Also featured in this show is a tribute to Canadian Shania Twain.
The Louisiana Hayride, complete with studio stage set, amazing tribute artists and live band will bring you back in time to when songs were meaningful, the words were understood and the sound was pleasant.

Wonderful flying machines land at fly-in breakfast

By Lori Larsen

Keep your eyes on the skies on Sunday, May 27 as planes piloted from all over fly in for the 61st annual Camrose Fly-in Breakfast starting at 7 a.m. until noon at the Camrose Municipal Airport.
Proceeds from the hardy breakfast will go to the Camrose Air Cadet Flying Program and for the cost of the breakfast you get orange juice, coffee, fluffy pancakes, eggs, bratwurst and back bacon.
Before or after breakfast enjoy the sites and sounds of a variety of aircraft as they make their descent into Camrose.
The Camrose Fly-In Breakfast is the longest running and largest of its kind in Western Canada and hosts over 100 aircraft each year, making Camrose Airport the busiest airport in Canada for that morning.
Bring the whole family out and support the Camrose Air Cadet Flying Program by enjoying a filling breakfast and watching the show against the wide open skies.

Chieftain earned niche as middle class car

Chieftain earned niche as middle class car
SPECIAL CHIEFTAIN Crystal Kelland of Rosalind stands by her choice of car at the Bawlf Show and Shine. Her 1952 Pontiac Chieftain was a popular vehicle in the early ‘50s on the prairies.

By Murray Green

Crystal Kelland of Rosalind has a natural American built 1952 Pontiac Chieftain with all numbers matching, with everything original or changed to a rat rod look to it.
“It came from Saskatchewan and my husband bought it for me four years ago. We were looking for a car for me and he found this one and said it drives. So, he went to look at it, on his birthday, and bought me this car.”
Crystal wasn’t sure what she wanted, as long as it was from the ‘50s.
“I was looking more for a muscle car, but the more my husband was looking at the old ‘50s cars, I thought  this could work. As a woman, I was thinking the different outfits I could wear, while driving this car. I love it when you go to car shows and you see people dressed to the era of their vehicles. You can tell they love their vehicles and are in tune with them. The ‘50s just have more character. You always get attention with it, no matter where you go.  You get the thumbs up and waves. The ‘50s car just grew on me and I love it now,” explained Crystal.
The Pontiac Chieftain was produced from 1949 to 1958. The 1949 Chieftain and Streamliner models were the first all new car designs to come from Pontiac in the post Second World War years. Previous cars had been 1942 models with minor revisions.
“We added pin striping to it, similar to what they did to cars from back in the day.”
A station wagon was added in 1952, with the demise of the top of the line Streamliner wagon.
“We replaced the brakes and made it road safe, but other than that everything is original. Two years ago, we rebuilt the engine. We put in the original motor to match the car. The first time we went for a drive with the car after buying it, we were driving down the road and all of a sudden it went pop, then rattle, rattle, rattle. We knew something was wrong, so we turned around and went back home as quickly as possible.”
They received the surprise of their life when they opened the oil pan. “There was a bushel of canola in the oil pan. When we bought it in Saskatchewan, it was sitting in a quonset since 1965. We got the engine turned over and it was running, but we were just putzing around town and not doing much with it. When we took it on the highway and driving at faster speeds things started to happen. The pistons were starting to seize up, so we had to rebuild the motor.”
For the 1952 model year, Pontiac discontinued the Streamliner leaving the Chieftain as their only offering. The Chieftain continued with the 120 inch wheelbase. Engine offerings were basically the same except for the eight-cylinder which got a .2 cubic inch enlargement. Horsepower did increase by 10 on the six cylinder and by 15 on the eight cylinder. Also, a red light to remind the driver that the parking brake was on was new. In the May 1952 issue of Popular Mechanics, the Chieftain was rated 14.9 seconds for a 0-60 mph time. Front head room was 36 inches, while rear head room was 35.75 inches.
“I like to go for Sunday drives. If it is a beautiful day, like today, I take the car to town to get groceries. People always wave and it feels like a car show whereever I go,” Crystal laughed.
“The mice were having a field day in the car, so we removed all of the ceiling and door panels because there were a lot of holes nibbled through. My husband diamond plated it inside so it looks more like a rat rod.”
Although it is her car, she has her husband to thank for the repairs. “My husband is a mechanic, so he did all of the work. I helped with a couple of things, but mostly supervised. He knows what he is doing, so I just stood back and let him do his thing. I could probably do some things, but I thought it was best if he just did it right compared to me,” said Crystal.
The Chieftain came with a gas gauge, ammeter, oil pressure gauge, and a temperature gauge which had marks for 160, 180, and 220 degrees Fahrenheit.
“I like going to car shows. Bawlf is nice and handy. In June, I’m going to  History Road Show at the Reynolds Museum in Wetaskiwin, I go to Camrose and some local shows. Last year, I went to Camrose and won first place in rat rods,” said an exited Crystal.
“People have been telling me about Round Hill, so I might have to try that one this year.”

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Powerline Baseball League opens with plenty of action

By Murray Green

The Armena Royals and Edmonton Expos quickly vaulted to the top of the Powerline Baseball League standings with two straight victories.
Edmonton Expos edged the Leduc Milleteers 3-2 and blanked the Holden Blue Jays 7-0 to gain four points. Meanwhile, the Royals beat Leduc 9-2 and edged the Tofield Braves 12-11 to have a good start to the season.
Camrose Axemen dropped a close 11-10 contest in their opening game. The Camrose Roadrunners were shut out 4-0 by Holden in the first outing.
In the other game on May 12, Rosalind Athletes defeated Sherwood Park 11-4. Axemen and Rosalind are now both 1-1 after Camrose outscored the Athletics 9-8 on May 16.
On May 22, Rosalind is in Leduc, Sherwood Park visits Tofield and Armena is in Holden.
Tofield meets the Axemen on May 23 and the Axemen play again the next night against the Roadrunners. Leduc is in Rosalind, Holden is in Sherwood park and Edmonton visits Armena on May 24. All games start at 7 p.m.
The Roadrunners host Leduc on May 28 at Harry Andreassen Field in Kin Park.
An all-star game is proposed for July 8 in Camrose.

City lot gets a clean slate

By Lori Larsen

The City of Camrose began remediation on the City owned vacant property and adjacent lane situated at the southwest corner of 47 Street and 50 Avenue.
Council approved the remediation of the lot during the Aug. 8, 2017 committee of whole meeting upon administration’s recommendation to mitigate the risk of further migration of contaminants off-site from a former underground storage tank.
The City’s intent is to clean up contaminants originating from this former storage tank, so that the property can eventually be marketed for sale to a future developer and provide a clean property.
According to the City’s director of engineering, Jeremy Enarson, the work involves full excavation and disposal of all contaminated soils both within the City owned property and in the adjacent lane to the west. “Based on the previously completed environmental site assessments, we have a fairly good idea of where the limits of the contamination are. However, the City really won’t know where those limits are until we start testing within the excavation. Also, there is risk that the City may find evidence of additional contamination sources on nearby private properties. If those sources are found, we will advise the property owner on which those sources are located, but the City will only be cleaning up the contamination that originated on the City-owned site.”
Materials removed during excavation will be farmed off site to allow the hydrocarbons to naturally vent off to the atmosphere before the soils are ultimately used as daily cover at the Camrose landfill. Administration does expect there may be some odour in the initial stages of excavation once the contaminated soil is exposed but indicated there is no safety or health threat, just more of a nuisance to businesses located closest to the site.
The work is expected to take up to three weeks to complete.
For more information contact engineering or infrastructure services at 780-672-4428.

County tackles dust control problem

By Murray Green

Camrose County resident Hazel Cail will receive some help with dust control this summer.
“I move that Camrose County apply dust control for 300 metres in front of the residence at NW 10-47-20-W4 along TWP RD 472 at a cost of approximately $900 because of the increased traffic on the road due to the bridge construction within the City of Camrose,” said councillor Trevor Miller.
“I want Camrose County to send a letter to the City of Camrose requesting that the City pay for the cost of dust control for any residences on TWP RD 472 from RR 202 to Highway 833 as a result of the detour of traffic to accommodate the construction of the bridge.”
The request was made at the May 8th County regular meeting.
Council also awarded a special licence to the Buckin’ in the Backyard bull riding event on June 15.
The County is still working on a Camrose-Leduc intermunicipal development plan. The process has been delayed due to the fact it has to go to the Capital Region for approval.
The County is reviewing the land use bylaw that would allow cannabis retail sales in some of the hamlets and villages.
Megan Lethbridge was selected to the position of acting assistant manager of Agricultural Services and as an inspector under the Agricultural Pest Act, Weed Control Act, Soil Conservation Act, and Animal Health Act.
County appointed Alvin Eyolfson, Nate Ferguson, Tim Sand and Rick Uglem as weed inspectors.
The County will be assisting the Camrose Flying Club in hosting the Snowbirds with road closures, communication with landowners and giving greetings on behalf of the County.

Wowing students about waste

Wowing students about waste
St. Patrick Catholic School Grade 4 students left to right, Sara Nordstrom, Ryder Desjardins and Karma Garvie join Centra Cam Recycling Depot representative Lynn 
Horsman in front of the massive pile of recycled plastic.

By Lori Larsen

Battle River Watershed Alliance has once again partnered with the City of Camrose and Centra Cam to host local Grade 4 students on a WOW (Waste in our Watershed) tour.
Students spend from 9 a.m. until 2 p.m. touring various facilities within Camrose to learn about the solid waste that leaves their homes, as well as the water they consume and wastewater they produce.
“These students know that the water does not simply come out of the tap,” said Battle River Watershed Alliance education and outreach coordinator Nathalie Olson. “By the end of the tour, they can tell you that our drinking water comes from Dried Meat Lake, which is part of the Battle River, and can tell you some of the steps the operators take to make it the clean, safe, drinking water that we all can enjoy.”
The tour was piloted in the spring of 2016 with Sparling School. Since then, every Grade 4 student in the City of Camrose has participated. “By the end of the 2017-18 school year, we will have had over 600 students,” said Olson.
Olson added that the impact of the tour on the students has been quite successful. “It is amazing to see the amount of waste the ends up in our landfill, much of which could be diverted through composting and recycling, or eliminated altogether. The students know that the three Rs have a hierarchy: reduce, reuse and recycle. The order is important, especially with the plastic crisis facing Canada right now. Recycling, although good, is not the best we can do. We also have to practice reducing, reusing and, as one Grade 4 class told me, refusing.”
The tour includes stops at Camrose wastewater treatment lagoon, Aberhart Bridge and Dried Meat Lake, the water treatment plant, lunch at one of  Camrose’s green spaces, and stops at Centre Cam Recycling and the City of Camrose Landfill.
“We couldn’t do this tour without our City of Camrose and Centra Cam partners who host many of the stops along the way.”
For more information about the WOW tour, visit http://battleriverwatershed.ca/.
“Seeing the passion these Grade 4 students have for reducing waste makes me feel responsible to do my part,” admitted Olson.

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Health Quality Council of Alberta seeks voice

By Murray Green

The Health Quality Council of Alberta (HQCA) is looking for Albertans to join its Patient and Family Advisory Committee, to bring the patient and family perspective to their health system improvement work.
“The HQCA is always exploring ways to bring the voice of Albertans and their experiences to our work,” said Andrew Neuner, chief executive officer for the HQCA. “Engaging with and listening to our Patient and Family Advisory Committee is one meaningful way in which we do this. Our members’ unique perspectives and diverse experiences inform and influence how we pursue opportunities to improve health service quality and patient safety for Albertans.”
This volunteer committee is made up of a group of 11 people from across the province and various backgrounds, who provide input to the HQCA to help improve aspects of Alberta’s publicly-funded healthcare system. The committee reports directly to the HQCA board of directors and focuses on issues of patient safety and health service quality from the system perspective.
“Our team of patient and family advisors work incredibly well together and everyone has an opportunity to speak and be heard–I am proud to serve on this committee,” said D’Arcy Duquette, HQCA Patient and Family Advisory Committee chair. “The HQCA supports our work, listens to and considers our viewpoints, and provides meaningful opportunities to participate in their work and activities and interact with other health care organizations.”
Applicants must be 18 years or older, reside in Alberta, and have a passion for improving the quality of Alberta’s healthcare system.
Committee members are appointed for a term of three years and may serve a maximum of two terms. In-person meetings are held four times each year, on a Saturday, rotating between Calgary and Edmonton. Expenses for travel to these meetings are covered by the HQCA.
Anyone interested in becoming a member is asked to complete an Expression of Interest form available online at www.hqca.ca.
The Health Quality Council of Alberta is a provincial agency that pursues opportunities to improve patient safety and health service quality for Albertans.

Summer camp

By Murray Green

AboutTime Productions wraps up the season with a Summer Camp. This musical will have three performances at 7 p.m. on June 4 to 6 at the Jeanne and Peter Lougheed Performing Arts Centre.
It is a musical caper about finding a place to belong at Camp Runamok. From scary camp directors, a bear encounter, and bugs taking over the camp, summer at Camp Runamok is anything but dull. Bonnie the blogger is devastated when her parents take her free time away from her. Her plans to stay at home with her video games, snacks and sleeping in is ruined with the prospect of going to camp.
Despite all the chaos of camp, her and the rest of the campers learn about the importance of friendship and finding a place to belong.

Births and Deaths

Births
- To Georgina and Eric Gaudet, of Bashaw, a daughter on May 2.
- To Gemma and Taylor Leibel, of Camrose, a son on May 7.
- To Lisa and Justin Williams, of Camrose, a son on May 9.

Deaths
- Keith Dennis Owen, of Camrose, on May 13, at 56 years of age.
- Robert Gordon Adams, of Bawlf, on May 15, at 64 years of age.