Garden party for Stollery Foundation

By Lori Larsen

Join the Stollery Women’s Network on Wednesday, July 17 at 7 p.m. at the Camrose Golf Course for a garden party event to raise funds and awareness for the amazing work of the Stollery Children’s Hospital Foundation. This will be the third such event in Camrose and, if last year is any indication of its popularity, get your tickets early. “Last year, drew a good crowd so we had to move it to a bigger venue,” said Stollery Women’s Network organizer Chella Ross. All the moneys raised from ticket sales for last year’s event were donated to the Stollery Children’s Hospital Foundation. “That was made possible because of all the generous donations and support we received from the community,” said Ross. While enjoying some wine and cheese, attendees last year heard personal and heart-tugging stories of how the Stollery Children’s Hospital directly impacted the lives of the speakers. “What really made it great was the atmosphere,” noted Ross. “It felt like all these moms getting together to love on kids and their families who are really going through some tough stuff.” The Stollery is one of the top three most specialized hospitals in Canada,
with the talent and equipment to treat some of the most complex cases. The hospital staff perform over 11,000 surgeries per year. The survival rate for children receiving care at the Stollery PICU is an impressive 95 to 97 per cent. To learn more about the Camrose and area Stollery Women’s Network, visit www.givingcomfort.stollerywomensnetwork.ca or contact brianne.thomas@stollerykids.com. For more information, visit the Camrose NOW! app or contact Chella Ross at 780-781-1788 or Nicole Denham at
780-781-2545. 
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Habitat home dedications

Partner family Novejane Pascua, second from left, and daughter Sophie, third from left, accept keys for their new Habitat home from Habitat for Humanity board president Jadene Mah, left, and Family Selection Committee member Ruth Ford, right.

Habitat home dedications

Partner family Ringgo Mangulabnan, second from left, and son Miguel, third from left, accept the keys for their new Habitat home from Mayor Norm Mayer, left, and Family Selection Committee member Leona Calhoun, right.
Missing from photo was Ringgo’s other son Manuel.


By Lori Larsen

Two Camrose families were handed the keys to their new Habitat homes at a heartfelt key turning event on June 27. Partner family Ringgo Mangulabnan and his sons Manuel and Miguel are recipients of one of the two homes built and dedicated this year. Novejane Pascua and daughter Sophie were recipients of the second 2019 build. Habitat for Humanity executive director Cody McCarroll welcomed special guest Mayor Norm Mayer who offered his sincere congratulations to both the partner families and was proud to say that Camrose continues to work on supplying affordable
living. Members of the Family Selection Committee Leona Calhoun and Ruth Ford spoke briefly about each partner family’s journey to obtaining a Habitat home and the dedication each family showed in being part of the builds. Both families were then presented with housewarming gifts on behalf of the Family Selection Committee. Habitat for Humanity board president Jadene Mah shared with attendees some recent statistics that validate the need for affordable housing in
Camrose. “According to the most recent Stats Canada data, 11.8 per cent of Camrose’s population is living in poverty,” noted Mah. “This equates to one family on every block.” Mah also said that at any given time in Camrose, there are at least 100 families that could qualify for Habitat’s Affordable Homeownership Program and that currently the ratio of applicants per Habitat homes is 10:1. Both Novejane and Ringgo thanked Habitat, the contractors and the community, “from the bottom of their hearts” for assisting in making the dream of home ownership  come true. This year marked the 37th and 38th homes built in Camrose and, to date, 40 families have been served including buy-backs. Habitat homes are built in partnership with the families and community volunteers and donations. The families are required to contribute 500 hours of “sweat equity” to assist in the building of their homes. Qualifying families for the Habitat Affordable Homeownership Program pay on their homes with zero-interest mortgages with payments going into a “Fund for Humanity” which is used to build future Habitat homes. For more information on Habitat for Humanity Camrose, visit the website at www.habitatcamrose.com or telephone project coordinator Brenda Murdock at 403-651-6142. read more
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Three Conservative members running

By Murray Green

Conservative Party of Canada members in the Alberta riding of Battle River-Crowfoot will be electing a candidate between July 14 and 17. Candidates to replace current MLA Kevin Sorenson, who is retiring from federal politics, are Damien C. Kurek, Jefferson McClung and Jeff Watson.     Kurek sat on Kevin’s board, worked alongside him while he was Minister of State for Finance and most recently served in his Camrose Constituency Office. For more information about Kurek, email info@votekurek.ca or call 403-575-5625. You can also visit his website at www.votekurek.ca and find him on Facebook, Twitter, and Instagram by searching @dckurek. McClung lives just outside of Stettler. He is currently a social studies teacher at Wm. E. Hay Stettler Secondary Campus. Contact McClung on Facebook @VoteMcClung. Former Ontario Member of Parliament Jeff Watson served in the district of Essex from 2004 until 2015 when he was unseated by New Democrat Tracey Ramsey. Previous to that, he had run in Windsor-West as a Reform Party candidate in 1997 and a Canadian Alliance candidate in 2000. Watson is also encouraging people to call at 587-574-5800, emaildirectly at votejeffwatson@gmail.com and follow his Facebook @JeffWatsonAB. Nomination vote in Consort is on Monday, July 15 with speeches from 11:30 a.m. to noon. Voting is from noon to 1:30 p.m. at the Consort Community Hall, 4604-50 Avenue. Nomination vote in Provost is on Monday,July 15 with speeches from 3 to 3:30 p.m. Voting is from 3:30 to 5 p.m. at the Provost Recreation and Cultural Centre, 5113-42 Street. Nomination vote in Wainwright is on Monday, July 15 with a candidate forum from 6:30 to 7:30 p.m. Voting follows from 7:30 to 9 p.m. at the Wainwright Communiplex, 700 2nd Avenue. Nomination vote in Camrose is on Wednesday, July 17 with a candidate Forum from 6:30 to 7:30 p.m. Voting is from 7:30 to 9 p.m. at the Camrose Regional Exhibition Grounds, 4250 Exhibition Drive. You can also vote in Oyen on July 14, Three Hills on July 16, Drumheller on July 16 and Stettler on July 17. Other candidates The People’s Party of Canada currently has one candidate in the Battle River-Crowfoot riding, David A. Michaud.

Local pickleball club to host open house

By Murray Green
The Camrose Pickleball Club is welcoming the community to an open house to introduce the sport on July 14 from 2 to 4 p.m. at the Max McLean Arena. Find out why pickleball is the fastest growing sport in North America. People can watch, or pick up a paddle and give it a try. Refreshments will also be provided. Pickleball is a mix of tennis, ping-pong and badminton and it’s fun for the whole family. There is a huge surge in younger players taking up the sport, so there is quite a mix in age groups. “Our players range in age from the teen years right up to the retirement years. Because it’s played on a smaller court than tennis, it’s easier on your joints and doesn’t involve as much running as tennis,” said Donna Duff, communications director of the local club.     Pickleball is a sport that has grown from 6,000 players in Canada in 2010 to 70,000 in only eight years. “Perhaps this is the sport you have been waiting to discover. It’s so much fun you won’t realize you are exercising and, trust me, it is a great stress reliever. It will take you away from life’s issues, while focussing on the game. It’s also perfect for those new in the City who want to meet friends and build new social connections,” she added. “Courts dedicated to pickleball are popping up all around the country, particularly in Alberta. Members of our club visited the grand opening of 20 new courts in Red Deer and also visited the town of Bashaw, which just opened six new courts. Our club is looking forward to the time when Camrose will have it’s own dedicated pickleball facilities,” said Donna. For more information contact communications@camrosepickleball.com or check out web page www.camrosepickleball.com.
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Special Olympics athletes give back

Camrose Special Olympics athlete Myles Spenst rounds third base heading to home plate during a tournament held on June 22.

By Lori Larsen

Special Olympic’s (Camrose) athlete Preston Wideman knows exactly what kindness and consideration can do in the lives of others. As a special Olympics athlete himself and now a volunteer with Active Start and FUNdamentals programs, he understands the importance of giving back to his community. “It is good that we (Special Olympics athletes) can get out in the community and do stuff,” he said.  “We do fundraisers so people know about Special Olympics and without it, I would be pretty bored.” Preston added that organized sports are so important because they assist him in knowing exactly when and where he needs to be and what he will be doing. Preston has been involved in organized sport, specifically Special Olympics for 15 years, first playing softball but eventually moving into a slew of different sports including basketball, bowling, bocce, golf, soccer, walking/running, curling, swimming and functional fitness. Special Olympics has been changing the lives of Special O athletes since its inception in 1968 in the United States, not only through organized sport but through the gift of inclusion that has awakened the hearts, souls and minds of millions of people world wide. In Canada, Special Olympics celebrates 50 years and continues to grow in awareness and strength.  The mission of Special Olympics embodies the goal that healthy and active lifestyles improve the wellbeing of individuals with an intellectual disability. In 1986, Calgary hosted Alberta’s first Special Olympics Canada Summer Games welcoming over 1,000 athletes and coaches from across Canada and thousands of delighted fans who cheered the flame of hope, carried by 12,000 Canadians across the country, as it entered McMahon Stadium. It was symbolic of not only hope, but the spirit of true-hearted competition. For Preston, it was his family that encouraged his participation in Special Olympics, especially his late uncle Glenn Kerik. “Preston needs to be kept busy,” smiled mother Carol. “It is idle time that is so well spent.” While he enjoys all the sports in which he is involved, Preston confesses that his favourite is softball. Being a Special Olympic athlete has afforded Preston, and many other athletes, opportunities that may not have otherwise been available and because of tireless efforts of volunteers and the generosity of community members, businesses and organizations, Special Olympics continues to provide an even broader spectrum of sports and opportunities for these amazing athletes to shine on and off the field, court, lane–any sport venue. And many of the athletes are happy and proud to give back by volunteering throughout the community at Special Olympics functions and events or, as is the case with Preston, with FUNdamentals and Active Start programs. Active Start is designed to get boys and girls, ages zero to six years, involved in daily active play in an effort to develop their movement skills and learn how to link them together. Preston has been volunteering with Active Start since its inception and credits Camrosians Lyndsey and Jason Delwo for not only implementing Active Start in Camrose, but continuing to be huge advocates of the program and Special Olympics. “I enjoy helping these athletes if they need help getting a ball for bowling or other things,” said Preston. “I try to encourage them by telling them to keep trying.” Preston is now assisting with outdoor sports as well. Carol noted how important it is for these younger athletes to see how successful the older athletes are and to have them to look up to, literally. Towering over these young up-and-coming athletes, Preston’s sincerity is as tall as his stature. “When Preston was first diagnosed, as a young parent I didn’t know what to do and what the future held,” Carol admits, but on the advice of her brother Glenn, soon felt some relief having the support of other parents with special needs children and knowing there was a healthy outlet for Preston to be involved. Preston has also been volunteering with Augustana Vikings men’s basketball coming up seven years, attending practices every Monday and Thursday and all home games. Outside of his activity in the Special Olympics and volunteering, Preston holds down two part time jobs in Camrose. He has been working with Sport Chek (Camrose) for over six years and Staples (Camrose) for two years. “I fill up the paper wall at Staples,” he said, through a slanted grin, obviously something he is particularly fond of doing. And while his height is an asset for that duty, he is also responsible for customer service at both businesses. Preston’s exuberance  is well spent in the Camrose community with his involvement in Special Olympics, volunteering and jobs. “It is so great that people give donations because it means we can get even more sports into the community, like we just got curling, and it helps us be able to attend events and tournaments and get equipment and uniforms,” said Preston gratefully. “But it also lets people know about Special Olympics athletes and what we are we doing. We (Camrose Cardinals) just received Team of the Year 2018.” Speaking on behalf of all the Special Olympics Camrose athletes, Preston beams with pride when he talks about his experiences with the organization and the gratitude he shares for a community that continues to support their successes. For more information on Special Olympics Alberta/Camrose, visit the website at www.specialolympics.ca/alberta/camrose. read more

Crossfire earn bronze at softball provincials

By Murray Green

The Camrose Crossfire U14C girls’ softball team captured bronze medals at provincials in Castor and Leduc on June 28 to July 1. In the first game on Saturday, Camrose played the Calgary West Wildcats and struggled for the first three innings, down 11-0. However, the girls rallied the next three innings and almost came back for the win, but came up short losing 11-8. The Crossfire played its second game that day against the Coaldale Lady Bandits, winning 16-3. On Sunday, the girls faced Drumheller Pure Venom in a very close contest, with the Crossfire winning 9-8. The final game of round-robin play had the Crossfire meeting the Sedgewick Steelers. Camrose beat the Steelers 10-3. Camrose ended round-robin play with a 3-1 win record, which left them in second place in their pool behind the St. Albert Angels, who also had a 3-1 record. The Angels placed first due to runs for/against because they were the only two teams in their pool who did not play each other. In the semifinal on Sunday, the girls went up against the Bonnyville Angels, who placed first in the other pool. It was a very close game, but the Crossfire came up short, losing 10-7. In the bronze medal final, the girls ended up playing the St. Albert Angels. The Camrose girls batted first, scoring two runs in the first inning. However, when the girls went to the field, the wind and rain forced the game to be put on hold, being rescheduled for the next evening in Leduc. The first five innings were a back and forth battle. Then Camrose finished strong in the last two innings and mercied St. Albert in the top of the seventh inning, winning the bronze medal game 18-10. “I was extremely lucky to coach this talented group of girls. We will try to challenge the girls next year and will look to play in a B division. Although we don’t have that single, dominant pitcher, we have excellent defense and when the bats are on, we feel we can challenge anyone. A huge thanks to the coaches who helped me out this year. The goal was to reach the semifinals in provincials, however, I really thought we had the team to win it all.  Our goal was reached this year, but it hopefully left us a little hungry and wanting a bit more.  All in all, it was a fantastic year and I hope all of the girls enjoyed it as much as the coaches did,” said coach Rob Lundstrom.

Wilkie girls quickly learned how to race

By Murray Green

The Wilkie girls learned how to keep up with the boys a long time ago. Now as teens they are racing cars on professional tracks. Kaylee, 15, and Natasha Wilkie, 13, are sisters from the Ferintosh-Bashaw area, who like to drive fast at speedways. “I’ve been racing for five years, starting my sixth year with a baby grand car. The baby grands are a lot more powerful than the first car I drove at races,” shared Kaylee. “It is a fast car at the track as opposed to the mini cups that you drive full throttle all of the way around the track.” She started in mini cup as most young racers do at the large tracks. “We went to the race track when I was nine and she (Natasha) was seven for my parents anniversary. We looked at the cars and I remember thinking those were so cool and that I wanted to get in one of those mini cars. We went into the pits after the race to talk to some guys. I took a car for a test drive in October and then in December we got a car to start racing in the next summer,” recalled Kaylee. “It is really fun and when we started there were a lot of new people learning together with new experiences. It was fast and filled me with adrenaline, just a lot of fun,” said Kaylee. “After baby grands I might move up to superstock, but I’m not sure yet.” Natasha started driving three years ago. “I really didn’t want to drive at first, but I followed my sister. I really like it now and it is fun. We usually have two heats where half of the cars go in each one and then the third heat has everyone going together. It is the opposite of how you placed in the first race, so if you finished last, you are starting in first in the final race,” explained Natasha. The mini cup cars are set for racing with very little modifications allowed. “You can adjust your seat, but you can barely see over the steering wheel. You adjust the brakes and throttle so you can actually reach them and your knees are not hitting the steering column,” she added. Most drivers make the switch from mini’s to baby grands at age 14. You have to be 18 to race on a national circuit. “We had our first race of the season on May 25 and I finished second in both heats and then my brakes seized, so I missed the final race. I think it was pretty good for the first time in a different category. It wasn’t my fault the car broke down,” said Kaylee. “I placed fifth, first and then fourth in the feature race. I could have done better and avoided some crashes,” admitted Natasha. “It was fun until we had to fix the car.” They passed on some advice to drivers just starting out. “Use your head out there and don’t do stupid things. Learn how to drive before you speed up, otherwise you are going to make a huge mess. A lot of rookies think they are going to set the world on fire and go full throttle. That doesn’t go very well. You have to learn how to drive first,” they suggested.
FUN FACTS Baby grands are two-third scale of a cup race car. Powered by a 1300cc Yamaha engine with a five-speed sequential transmission, these cars can achieve speeds over 150 miles per hour. These scaled late models are spec cars, meaning all cars are manufactured the same way and must maintain factory specifications. This creates a close and exciting series that depends on drivers skill. With the same size roll cage piping as full size late models, plus all the same adjustment areas, race parts and even a quick change rear end, these cars are fast and safe for all competitors. Mini cup cars are half scale models for young drivers. They have tube chassis, adjustable suspension, coil-over shocks, disc brakes, rack and pinion steering.  The goal of the series is to provide an inexpensive entry level stock car racing experience for new drivers. There are two divisions that use the super mini cup. One is for children aged eight to 16 called the Future Stars of Racing.  The cars are identical in every respect except that the Future Stars of Racing cars use a small carburetor to reduce the power of the engine.

Protect your child with a safety seat

By Murray Green

Keep your child, or children in your vehicle safe by using proper car seats and seatbelts. Seatbelts and child safety restraints are a critical part of your vehicle’s safety system and provide the best protection in a collision. Still, about five per cent of Albertans do not use seatbelts on a regular basis. This works out to nearly 200,000 people who put their lives at risk every day when they travel. “While we have come a long way in getting Albertans to buckle up, the number of people who do not use seatbelts regularly is too high. For everyone’s safety, buckle up and make sure your children are in the proper safety seat before you shift into drive,” said Brian Mason, minister of transportation. Police officers are firsthand witnesses to the consequences of vehicle collisions. This month, Alberta RCMP would like to remind motorists that the simple act of buckling up will drastically increase your chances of surviving a collision. “Seatbelts and child safety seats are proven, simple and effective devices that can protect you and your passengers in a collision. By buckling up, you improve your chances of minimizing injuries or surviving a serious crash by 50 per cent; so make sure to buckle up, no matter how short the ride,” added Supt. Gary Graham, officer in charge, Alberta RCMP Traffic Services. “There is still a small group who don’t buckle up because they are only driving a short distance,” says Rick Gardner, Superintendent, Alberta Sheriffs Traffic Operations. “I would like to remind them that collisions can happen anywhere and at the blink of an eye; so whether you are driving to work or to a nearby corner store, remember to buckle up.” The Alberta government has developed online child safety seat training that helps caregivers and professionals who work with children learn how to properly select, install and use child safety seats. Everyone in a vehicle is required by law to use a seatbelt or child safety seat that is properly worn and adjusted.   In 2016, there were 53 deaths and 375 injuries to people not properly restrained at the time of their collision. Collisions involving restraint users had a much lower injury rate (6.8 per cent) than those not using restraints (24 per cent). Drivers are responsible for ensuring that passengers under the age of 16 are properly secured using a child safety seat or seatbelt. Drivers may be fined $155 for each unrestrained passenger under 16. Properly used seatbelts can reduce fatal and serious injury by 45 to 65 per cent, depending on the type of vehicle and seating position. Always refer to the manufacturer’s instructions for the maximum weight and height limits of the child’s particular car seat and to the vehicle manual for installation instructions. Without a booster seat, a child is three and a half times more likely to suffer a significant injury. Children under the age of 13 are safest in the back seat of a vehicle, in proper restraints based on their age, height and weight.

Blue Jays nab first in Powerline

By Murray Green

Despite the rain, the Holden Blue Jays vaulted into first place in the Powerline Baseball League. Holden has a 13-1-1 record with one game remaining in league play. The Blue Jays beat the Edmonton Expos 10-0, defeated the Tofield Braves 11-1 and outlasted the Leduc Milleteers 10-6 to claim the top spot.  The regular season finishes on July 11 and then the playoffs begin shortly after. The top three teams in the league will  advance to the playoffs. The fourth and fifth place teams will play a one-game wild card contest to qualify for the final playoff spot. The Armena Royals are in second with a 10-2-1 record, third belongs to the Rosalind Athletics at 10-2. The Expos are next with a 7-5-1 record, followed by the Camrose Roadrunners and Tofield who are tied with a 6-8 record after 14 games.

Rotary reaches out locally and internationally

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Camrose Rotary Club board of directors look forward to an exciting year of community philanthropy and new membership. Left to right, back row, are secretary Kim Boyco, foundation chair Ted Gillespie, president Roy Wallace, treasurer Lou Henderson. Front row from left, president elect Jenn Stone,
public relations Heather Berry and community service Celia Lethwood. Missing from photo is youth services Lisa Vornbrock.


By Lori Larsen

Rotary Clubs across the globe not only do amazing things to contribute to the well being of the communities they are part of but clubs also fulfill global responsibilities by donating time and funds to causes that reach far beyond the confines of their own communities. Rotary Club of Camrose and Rotary Club of Camrose Daybreak has and continues to be a part of sharing goodwill both in Camrose and Camrose County as well as world wide. Recently the initiative to fund a surgery skills laboratory in Tanga, Tanzania came to fruition, after approximately five years, when the idea was first spurred. In February of this year the project received final approval. A committee composed of Rotary Club of Camrose members LeRoy Johnson, Roy Wallace, Kim Boyco and Don Rebus worked diligently on securing funds and following through with all the requirements to ensure the project was a success. “When I was president of the Rotary Club we invited previous Camrosian Dr. Ronald Lett (graduate of Ecole Camrose Composite High School) to speak at a local meeting about his work in Africa,” said Rotary member LeRoy Johnson. After hearing Dr. Lett, cofounder of the  Canadian Network for International Surgery, speak, Johnson, along with other members of the Rotary Club became inspired to involve the Camrose Rotary Club in one of Ron’s international projects. “I thought this would tie right in with Rotary humanitarian work. “He has had surgeons from all over Canada going overseas to teach courses to frontline health nurses and midwives on a lot to do with womens’ health.” After completing the courses the health care workers go out into the rural areas apply the skills” At that time Lett spoke he invited the club to become involved in a lab being constructed in Rownada, however that particular project completed prior to the Camrose Club being able to get involved, so Lett suggested the Tanga project. Johnson, Wallace, Rebus and a Wetaskiwin Rotary member, Bertha Briggs travelled to Tanga to survey the situation and determine if in fact the project would fit the club’s mandate. While it took the better part of two years, the project has received approval by Tanzanian  government officials, the Rotary Clubs in Camrose (District) and Tanga (District)and the funding has been secured. “The clinic will be located on the site of an existing hospital to ensure the building remains secure,” noted Johnson. “This wouldn’t have happened if is weren’t for the interest of the Rotary Club of Camrose. We are not only doing this as an international project but it was a local boy, Dr. Ron Lett that peaked the interest in the first place with his involvement with CNIS and his work overseas.” The main focus behind the Skills Lab is to train nurses (specifically) on procedures they can use to  go out into the rural areas of Tanga an deliver babies. The overall goal is to reduce infant mortality rates In speaking on the importance of supporting international as well as local initiatives, Johnson said that in order to solve bigger issues, such as Polio, communities around the world have to join forces. Getting funds Even with an overall consensus to proceed with the Skills Lab Project in Tanga the club was still faced with the task of raising, what they hoped to be at least $50,000 (US funds). Fundraising efforts for the Tanga project began with generous donations by a few donors outside of the Rotary Club then through consorted efforts of club members, continued until reaching a final tally of approximately $70,000 (US funds) which equates to approximately $100,000 Cdn. The funds (US) break down as follows. Camrose Rotary Club $15,000 over two years, Camrose District Rotary Club $5,000, Tanga Rotary Club $5,000, Tanga District Rotary Club $8,000, community of Camrose business and individual donations $7,500, and a global grant of $29,500. In order for the Rotary Club organization to become involved in international projects the projects must first meet the criteria and be something that is sustainable. “Three of us (from Camrose Rotary Club) and a member from Wetaskiwin Rotary Club went to Tanga to see the project and get a feel for it,” said Camrose Rotary Club present president Roy Wallace. “We met with the principal of the University (where the lab will be located), members of the Tanga Rotary Club  and some people from the Tanzanian Ministry of Health. We wanted to ensure the space where the lab was to be located was properly secure and protected.” Once the Camrose Rotary Club members realized the funds would exceed the original goal they collaborated with CNIS to secure a training course for the trainers in an effort to make the program and skills lab even more sustainable. Global responsibility The Rotary Club International strives to ensure a better world for all to live both at the local and international level. Wallace explained that overall the Rotary Club contributes approximately 80 per cent of their efforts locally and 20 per cent internationally. “It is important that we do international projects,” explained Wallace. From a personal perspective, having moved to Camrose from Jamaica, Wallace related how Canadians are looked upon favourably around the world for their generosity and willingness to give to others in need. “Sometimes in third world countries they receive these donations (specific projects) and they are not aware of where it came from. With Rotary Club doing this, we are ambassadors to Canada.” Once the project is completed in Tanga a sign will be displayed at the site indicating that the project was made possible through the Rotary Club of Camrose, Canada in association with the Tanga Rotary Club. “My job as international chair is to be an ambassador for the community to take the community Camrose Brand international,” remarked Wallace. “We live in an amazing community when they get behind something they go all out.” The next international project on the radar for the Camrose Rotary Club is the Bustamante Hospital for Children in Kingston Jamaica. “They need nine incubators and they only have one working.” On a personal level, Wallace praised the Club for mentoring new members and building strong community contributors and leaders. He happily reported  that the Rotary Club of Camrose welcomed him with open arms. “Rotary teaches you to be a leader and better than you are, reach further dig deeper affect your community, your country, the world.” The Rotary Club invites everyone to be a part of the Club and is always welcoming new members. For more information on either the Camrose Rotary Club or the Camrose Rotary Club Daybreak visit the homepage at portal.clubrunner.ca/441 or facebook pages.  read more

Minor ball teams begin hunt for provincial berths

By Murray Green

Camrose Minor Ball teams are competing in Baseball Alberta games as teams battle for spots at provincial tournaments. U18 double-A The Camrose Cougars support a 7-5 record after 12 games. Camrose hosts the Stettler Storm on July 17 at 7 p.m. on Harry Andreassen Field in Kin Park. The Cougars then travel to South Jasper Place in Edmonton to take on the Jays and the Okotoks Outlaws on July 20 and 21. U15 triple-A Camrose (19-6) host the Red Braves on July 13 for two games, at noon and 3 p.m. The team also hosts the Northwest Prairie Pirates 3 p.m. on July 14 at Harry Andreassen Field in Kin Park. Camrose travels to Edmonton on July 20 and 21 for two games against the Edmonton Expos and single contest against the Pirates. U15 double-A Camrose Cougars and Round Hill Royals are entered in the U15 division. Camrose is at 5-7 after 12 games this season. Camrose host the Fort Saskatchewan Red Sox, Calgary Dinos and Calgary Cubs on July 20 and 21 in Duggan Park. Round Hill heads to Beaumont on July 13 to play the BoSox and Drumheller. They play Beaumont again on July 18. U13 double-A Camrose Cougars Reds (7-5) and the Camrose Cougars Royals (9-3) are entered in the U13 division. The Reds team goes to Fort Saskatchewan to play  the host team, Lloydminster and Chestermere on July 13 and 14. The Royals play Innisfail and Oyen on July 20 and 21. The Rosalind Jr. A’s are 9-4 after 13 games in league play. The A’s take on Castor, Coronation and Whitecourt on July 13 and 14. U11 double-A The Camrose Royals are 3-9 in league play. Camrose heads to Edmonton to play the Padres, Red Deer Braves and Sylvan Lake Mariners on July 20 and 21.

Wildlife session takes flight

By Lori Larsen

Join the flock on Thursday, July 11 at 7 p.m.,  at the Stoney Creek Centre located at 5320-39 Avenue for the Camrose Wildlife Stewardship Society What’s that Bird? presentation by University of Alberta Augustana Campus professor of environmental science and geography Dr. Glen Hevenegaard. Hevenegaard will be speaking about the basics of the popular hobby of birding in the Camrose area. He will be sharing information on how to identify common birds, attract birds to your own backyard and support the conservation movement. Hevenegaard comes with loads of experience in the field of environmental science and geography but more important a passion for our natural world. He is the manager of the Augustana Miquelon Lake Research Station and sits or has sat on such committees and groups as the Community Service-Learning, Sustainability, Camrose Wildlife and Stewardship Society (chairperson), AB Parks Social Science Working Group, World Commission on Protected Areas, Tourism and Protected Areas Specialty Group and the Protected Areas Working Group, Beaver Hills Initiative. Attendees of any Wildlife Stewardship summer sessions are encouraged to put their name into the draw box for a prize that will be drawn during the last session of the season. For more information on any of the Wildlife Stewardship sessions or program, visit the Camrose  website or Facebook page, email Brittany at  wildlifestewardship@camrose.ca or telephone 780-672-0544.

Food Artisans of Camrose County planning busy summer

By Murray Green
A new brochure was launched by the Food Artisans of Camrose County as the group prepares for a busy summer of activities. The brochure lists all food producers and processors in the County and City of Camrose and is available at all of the farmers’ markets within the County, at the County office and from the food producers in the brochure. “We are offering a contest on social media to increase awareness about our food producers and to encourage consumers to shop local,” said Marian Williams, an advocate for Food Artisans. “We are gaining popularity across the province as a local food initiative that is supported by the County,” explained Marian. “We have 60 businesses on board with us and that keeps growing.” This spring started with a workshop. “This was our second producer workshop that we have had and again, we were overwhelmed with the response that we had with around 50 producers and it was very successful,” she added. “One of the highlights of the evening was a panel presentation of three local food producers. The topic was New Ways to Increase Profits on your Farm. And wow! Did they ever have new ideas. They shared ideas that worked, and some that didn’t. It was an excellent sharing of knowledge. We also had Megan Lethbridge, with the County ag services, doing some one-on-one networking and that may have been the best part of the evening, because they got to talk to each other about ideas and get to know each other better,” shared Marian. “Our goal is to create awareness of our community that produces local and to support the producers themselves to help them become more successful,” said Andrea Forstbauer, from Grey Arrow Farms and another member of Food Artisans committee. “One thing we noticed about producers was their lack of social media presence. We showed them they can reach their potential by being online and directing more traffic to their page. Many are overwhelmed and don’t know how to get started. We encouraged them to bring their laptops and helped them set up a page that night. We encouraged them to link to each other and help all of the producers.” Alberta Local Foods Week is in mid-August. “We plan to set up displays at the farmers’ markets in the County–Camrose, Miquelon Lake and Bashaw,” said Megan. A needs assessment was completed to give the Food Artisans directions for the future. “We found out when the best time was to have a workshop and the need to have a brochure. Our new brochure lists the producers, what they sell and how to find their products. We also have producer spotlights that showcase businesses,” added Megan. The Food Artisans are expanding their reach this summer. “I attended a visitors’ information session this spring. We put up a booth with a banner and some food to showcase. As people visited the booths, they stopped at ours and showed lots of interest,” said Jennifer Filip of Tourism Camrose and the Food Artisans committee. “This summer with Go East (of Edmonton), we are planning a bunch of road trips  and featuring the food producers that we have in the contest. We will be shooting a video of the Downtown Market in Camrose.”   The Food Artisans will also be seen at the various farmers’ markets around the County. Alberta Approved Farmers’ Markets in Camrose County include the Bashaw market on Saturday, Rose City farmers’ market in Camrose on Thursday, the Camrose Downtown market on Thursday, the Miquelon Lake farmers’ market on Friday and the Camrose and District farmers’ market on Saturday. “We are taking this opportunity during Alberta Local Food Week in mid-August, to promote the Food Artisans of Camrose County to the general population to make more people aware of it. We are always looking for more producers,” said Marian. “We want to have a fall get-together after harvest. Plans are not finalized yet.” Most people want to support local producers; they just need to know who they are and that is what the organization is working on.

Baba’s loving lessons

By Lori Larsen

Originally from Polska, just outside of Holden, Steffy Kawalilak, now living in Camrose at Rosealta, recently celebrated her 95th birthday and was honoured with a photo of herself and five generations of girls. Steffy and late husband John raised a family of 10 children, which grew to eventually include 20 grandchildren, 35 great-grandchildren and four great-great-grandchildren with one more on the way.   “Our grandma is one of the most hardworking, loving, kindest people you will ever have the privilege of knowing,” said granddaughter Trista Waschuck She is such an amazing role model for all of us, of what a woman should be.” She began her own life farming, then married a farmer and lived on the farm until 1988, when she moved into her own home in Camrose. “She worked hard every day of her life,” declared Trista. “We are all so honoured to have so many wonderful memories with Grandma and are looking forward to many, many more.”
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Reflections

By Bonnie Hutchinson

My Mom,
the accidental pathfinder
“I knew I’d been accepted when they stopped being nice to me.” My mom, Berdie Fowler, is often on my mind at this time of year. Her birthday was July 1, Canada Day. When mom was a little girl growing up in the East Bittern Lake district, there was always a community picnic on July 1, with races and ballgames and sometimes even fireworks. Mom thought the party was for her. A great thing for a child to believe! Mom did not set out to be a pathfinder. She just did what she thought needed to be done. Some of those things happened to be a first for women in Alberta. When she was elected president of the Camrose Chamber of Commerce, she was the first woman in Alberta, and the second woman in Canada, to hold that position. Several men resigned, thinking that role was no place for a woman. That brings us to the Alberta Opportunity Company (AOC). *** AOC was an Alberta Crown Corporation. Its independent board of directors reported directly to the Alberta legislature through the minister of economic development and trade. AOC provided financial and management assistance to small–and medium-sized Alberta businesses that were not able to obtain reasonable terms and conditions from regular banks. Loans were used for purposes like land or equipment, or refinancing existing loans. The provincial government invited mom to serve on the AOC board, and she accepted. She was the first woman ever appointed to that board. Just as when she became president of the local Chamber of Commerce, she knew there was opposition to her appointment. One of those opposed was the chair of the board. As was her style, she did not acknowledge the opposition. She just quietly went about being a competent credible board member. The Alberta Opportunity Company board would fly to different locations in Alberta, meet all day, and break for lunch at a local restaurant. When the meetings were in Edmonton or Calgary (places to which mom would drive), dad sometimes came along. He would do other things, while mom was at the meeting, and often join the group for lunch. On one of the days when dad had joined the group for lunch, the all-day meeting was held in a boardroom of a private club. When the group broke for lunch and went into the dining room, the maitre `d stopped mom at the door. “I’m sorry, madam,” he said. “You aren’t able to come in. This is a men-only dining room.” What? Clearly nobody had been aware of this policy when lunch reservations were arranged. Different men in the group had different expressions on their faces–some surprised, some outraged, some just uncomfortable. Dad was one of the outraged ones. Before he could say much, mom–never one to make a public fuss–just said to the board chair something like, “We’ll find another place and I’ll join you for the rest of the meeting.” She and dad went off to find another lunch place. Back home over the dinner table, mom and dad laughed over the story. They imagined mom submitting a lunch expense claim from “Joe’s Beanery.” Mom did say, “I would have been more upset except that all the men around me were upset.” I understand that never again did the Alberta Opportunity Company book a meeting at that facility. I believe words may have been exchanged. Years later, I attended an event at that same private club, and there were women in the dining room. Mom once confided to me that she was pleased when, in her second year as an AOC board member, on the flight back from a meeting, she happened to sit beside the board chair. He said to her quietly, “Berdie, you do everything right.” She knew what he meant, and treasured that comment. That was the day she told me, “I knew I’d been accepted when they stopped being nice to me.” *** I’d love to hear from you! Send a note about this column or suggestions for future columns to Bonnie@BonnieHutchinson.com and I’ll happily reply within one business day.
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Lisa kaastra
By Lisa Kaastra

Little House on the Slough

These rainy, golden days 

By Lisa Kaastra
Summer days at the Slough have been a mixed bag of weather, so we split our days between hunting strawberries out in the garden sunshine and taking cover inside during rainstorms.
“Do you hear the sky’s tummy growling?” I ask my two-year-old, standing enraptured on the front porch, wrapped in her blankie and staring up at the dark clouds.
She nods enthusiastically in response and points out in the direction of the road. “It’s raining…It’s raining! Let’s go play…outside!”
In all honesty, I’m not quite as excited for a dance out in the pouring rain, the wind now reaching our sheltered porch and funneling to the front door. But she’s like a duck out of water, determined to be outside in even the colder storms to play in the park, walk to grandma’s house, jump on the trampoline, and visit the market.
With the forecast telling non-stop days of rain, I finally give in to the latter and push the stroller with a sleeping baby sister, while my eldest daughter stomps her way through the water just off of Main Street. She holds a bright yellow umbrella precariously over her head to match her bright yellow raincoat, carefully choosing the most ‘puddliest’ path.
She points out the pots of honey and picks the fruit from BC stand; she asks about the perogies and bison meat, and waves to her auntie selling photographs. The rain doesn’t bother her in the least and she is in all her raincoat glory.
While I’m grateful that our little shared hobby farm doesn’t require sunshine for our livelihood, I will admit that there have been times I’d rather trade in my rubbers for shorts and a suntan…not to mention a few dry days to make the levelling and seeding of our front yard possible. But with all the green growth that follows the rain, I really haven’t anything to complain about. Even if I’m not as puddle-happy as a toddler.
So with a few more jumps, we finally come home (with protest), and drag our boots through the mud just below the front step; we carry in our market goodies and put the baby down for another nap. And then, just as the sun is starting to come back out for the last shine of the day, my daughter and I plop down on the porch with two bowls and a bag of peas—I shell, and she eats.
I take a deep breath and smell the fresh, new scent that comes only after a good outdoor soaking.
“Breathe in, my girl. Can you smell that?”
She responds with an exaggerated whiff and follows with a sigh. “Uh-hmmm…I Love it!” I can’t help but laugh, and steal one of the few remaining peas from the bottom of the bowl. “Me too, girlie…me too.”
Even with the rain, these days are pretty golden after all. read more

Three Conservative members running

By Murray Green

Conservative Party of Canada members in the Alberta riding of Battle River-Crowfoot will be electing a candidate between July 14 and 17 in eight different communities.
Candidates to replace current MLA Kevin Sorenson, who is retiring from federal politics, are Damien C. Kurek, Jefferson McClung and Jeff Watson.
Nomination vote in Consort is on Monday, July 15 with speeches from 11:30 a.m. to noon. Voting is from noon to 1:30 p.m. at the Consort Community Hall, 4604-50 Avenue.
Nomination vote in Provost is on Monday, July 15 with speeches from 3 to 3:30 p.m. Voting is from 3:30 to 5 p.m. at the Provost Recreation and Cultural Centre, 5113-42 Street. Nomination vote in Wainwright is on Monday July 15 with a candidate forum from 6:30 to 7:30 p.m. Voting follows from 7:30 to 9 p.m. at the Wainwright Communiplex, 700 2nd Avenue.
Nomination vote in Camrose is on Wednesday, July 17 with a candidate Forum from 6:30 to 7:30 p.m. Voting is from 7:30 to 9 p.m. at the Camrose Regional Exhibition Grounds, 4250 Exhibition Drive.
You can also vote in Oyen on July 14, Three Hills on July 16, Drumheller on July 16 and Stettler on
July 17.

Cool spring yields slow growth

By Murray Green

The Camrose region experienced a cool, yet dry spring followed by a wet start to summer.
“A cool, dry spring this year did not allow pastures and hay lands in many parts of the province to grow as rapidly as they usually do,” said Barry Yaremcio, beef and forage specialist at the Alberta Ag-Info Centre. “Along with the weather, previous years’ stressors have resulted in pasture poor growth.”
Yaremcio indicated that in some situations, producers had no choice but to turn their cows out to graze three to four weeks earlier than normal because of short or exhausted stored feed supplies.
“Research has shown that for every day animals are turned out early in the spring, the grazing period in the fall is shortened by three days.”
In some parts of the province, grasses have headed out early and alfalfa has gone to bloom.
“The plants are trying to complete their life cycle much earlier than normal, and that affects the overall yield and quality of forage available to livestock on pasture. If those pasture plants are not lightly grazed or clipped to remove the heads, they will go dormant for the remainder of this growing season. It is not likely that they will produce additional forage.”
Yaremcio said that once grasses are pollinated and seed starts to form, protein content in the forage drops roughly one to 1.5 per cent, per week. “Total digestible nutrients (TDN) or energy content will drop by 1.5 to 2.5 per cent per week as well. Legumes will also experience a loss in quality once pod set occurs.”
He added that under dry conditions, the loss of quality occurs three to four weeks sooner. “Rotational grazing keeps plants in the vegetative state, prevents the deterioration of quality and entices the plants to continue growing. A minimum rest period of 30 days between grazing events is critical to allow the plants to recover.”
It is possible to extend the grazing period by supplementing with grain, milled or screening pellets, by product feeds, protein tubs or blocks.
“Availability, cost and nutritional content are all considerations when developing a program.”
He suggests trying to maintain a constant feeding program throughout the summer. “If supplies are tight, using a combination of two or three different products is advisable. Abrupt changes from one type of supplement to another could cause digestive upsets and animals going off feed for some time.
“Feed grains such as barley, oats, triticale, wheat or rye are possible options, but each grain has a different limit of how much to feed per head per day. Screenings from seed cleaning plants or pelleted screening pellets fall into the same category as the feed grains mentioned above. It may take four to six pounds of supplemental grains, pellets or by products every two or three days to keep cows in good condition and maintain milk production. Calves that eat some of the supplemental grain pellets or by products will improve their gains as well.”
By product feeds such as distillers’ grains or malt sprouts are high in protein, phosphorus and sulphur. “A 1:1 or 2:1 mineral will not be suitable to use in this situation,” he explained. “It is necessary to feed a 3:1 mineral or feedlot type mineral with three to four per cent magnesium to increase calcium and magnesium levels to prevent grass tetany or downer cows.”  
Cutting a cereal crop for green chop silage is another option. The cut material is fed fresh to the grazing animals. It must be consumed the same day it is cut, otherwise the presence of aerobic bacteria will cause it to spoil.
Tubs and blocks are products also available on the market, and there are two types—protein and energy.
With all the different products on the market, it is best to read the tag to evaluate each product’s nutrients and compare that to the animals’ requirements. “Ask for help if you are not sure how to make the comparisons. The amount of product the animals need to consume may make the cost unreasonable,” said Yaremcio.
Mineral products provide macro minerals, trace minerals and vitamins but do not supply any protein or energy. “They are essential for a balanced nutrition program, but they should be fed in conjunction with other feeds that supply energy or protein.
“The biggest question to consider when using any supplemental product is cost,” he added. “Take time to evaluate the costs and benefits before making any purchases.”

Prestage named to Agricultural Hall of Fame

By Camrose County

Camrose County would like to congratulate Robert (Bob) Prestage, former councillor and reeve of Camrose County on his induction into the Canadian Agricultural Hall of Fame. The ceremony will take place Nov. 28 in Quebec City.
Bob was inducted into the Alberta Agriculture Hall of Fame in 2016 and placed on the Camrose County Agricultural Wall of Honour in 1990.
He graduated from the University of Toronto in 1959 with a Bachelor of Science in Agriculture Degree. In the early 1970s, he started the progeny test program that is still being used across Canada. He exported livestock around the world in the 1980s and 1990s and tells stories about loading 747s bound for Japan with cattle.  Bob has been an international ambassador of Alberta beef for 60 years!
Bob has also been active in many non-profit organizations and community groups over the years, including the Chamber of Commerce, the Kinsmen of Camrose, amateur hockey, the Camrose Regional Exhibition and Alberta 4-H.
He is a proud family man and credits his success to his family’s support. He served as reeve of Camrose County from 1983 to 1989.
Congratulations from Camrose County council and staff on this outstanding achievement.

Camrose Fish and Wildlife gets addition to roster

By Lori Larsen

Camrose and District Fish and Wildlife Enforcement Branch (FWEB) welcomed a new officer to the roster on June 1. With the goal of being able to increase the service and better serve the needs of the district, Officer Kim Berscheid has joined forces with District Officer Lorne Rinkel.
Berscheid originally hails from The Pas, Manitoba area, where she grew up in a rural setting surrounded by some of the country’s most beautiful natural resources.
Childhood influence
Berscheid’s childhood of growing up in Northern Manitoba, surrounded by natural resources, was in part what influenced her decision for a career in natural resource law enforcement. “I grew up on Clearwater Lake where it is not unheard of to catch a 40-inch lake trout,” she smiled. “My family was into hunting and fishing. I always knew I wanted a career in law enforcement and what can be better than to be able to combine what you love doing on your personal time with work.”
She noted that FWEB officers all have a vested interest in natural resources. “We want to protect them not only for ourselves, but for everyone else to enjoy in the future.
“We (FWEB Officers) strive to know more about natural resources.” A lot of which she admits is learned from on-the-job experience and being mentored by other officers. “I have had the opportunity to work with some fantastic officers. We (FWEB officers) do a lot of travelling around the province in our work and we meet and learn from a lot of different officers. It makes you a well-rounded officer.”
Post secondary
Officer Berscheid began her post-secondary education at University College of the North (UCN) with the law enforcement program. She then continued into the Natural Resource Management program, and finally transferred to Lethbridge Community College where she completed her degree in Bachelor of Applied Science (Conservation Enforcement).
 Field work
While completing her education, Officer Berscheid first worked for Manitoba Conservation as a park patrol officer stationed in various provincial parks, including Bird Hill Provincial Park and Grand Beach Provincial Park.  “Grand Beach is seven kilometers of beach,” noted Berscheid. “On a hot weekend, there could be up to 10,000 people there. It always made for interesting situations. I dealt with a lot of public safety issues, bears, fishing, pretty much anything you can think that would happen in a park setting.”
In 2013, her second year of being a supervisor and her graduation year from post-secondary, she was offered a full time position with Alberta Fish and Wildlife Enforcement Branch. She began her Alberta FWEB career in the Stony Plain area, working there for three years. This district introduced her to the wonderful resources that Alberta has to offer and was a fast paced district with high use fisheries and bountiful hunting. After three years, Berscheid then transferred to the Edmonton district where she got to experience life in the big city. This district provided a very unique opportunity to be an “Urban Game Warden”, with very different challenges associated to working in a city setting. As of June 1, she became the second officer for the Camrose district.
Berscheid came to Camrose for a bit of a change in scenery and to experience other facets of the job. More importantly, she wants to be able to develop connections with the community, something that was more difficult in a very busy urban setting such as Edmonton. “It is important to be an officer whom residents feel comfortable calling when they have concerns.”
Because Camrose district has a solid reputation for thorough and in-depth investigations, Berscheid was also excited to be able to transfer in and develop her own investigative skills. “I take pride in letting complainants know outcomes of files once they have been completed.” She feels that is important in maintaining great relations with residents and ensuring cooperation and assistance.
Berscheid is an instructor for the FWEB boating instructor team teaching jet boat, small and large prop and personal watercraft courses, and she also possesses unique skills in immobilization of urban species that can pose a potential danger to people and themselves. “In Edmonton, I dealt mostly with moose, where we would have to tranquilize them and move them out of the area. As you can imagine, it is very dynamic. They would usually end up in school grounds or parks or peoples’ backyards.” She remarked that relocation can potentially be extremely stressful for wildlife and, for that reason, Fish and Wildlife prefers not to relocate wildlife unless absolutely necessary. “It is out of necessity that we do, to get them out of a bad situation where they could end up hurting a person or themselves. At the end of the day, we want what is best for both residents and the animals.”
On a final note, Berscheid said educating the public will be an important part of her duties here and she looks forward to working with both County and City residents. She encourages residents to contact the FWEB office with any inquires or suspicions and to continue being an important part of protecting their own property and all natural resources.
To report any suspected poaching or serious public land abuse,  visit alberta.ca/report
poacher call the toll free number at 1-800-642-3800.

Year round grazing school session

By Murray Green

You can attend a session entitled Year Round Grazing School with Jim Gerrish on July 12.
The morning session (beginning at 9 a.m.) will be classroom style, after lunch you will proceed to the field.
Topics covered include why you should be out of the hay business, planning for year-around grazing. Winter forage options, effectively grazing winter pastures and effectively grazing corn. Contact the Battle River Research Group at Forestburg, 780-582-7308.
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New Norway Fire dedicated crew of volunteers

New Norway Fire Service fleet and 12 members of the 16 member crew

By Lori Larsen

A group of 16 dedicated, ambitious and closeknit volunteers are what composes the Camrose Country Fire Services, New Norway Fire Hall organization, who together take great pride in ensuring quick and efficient response to calls for service.
Operating out of the New Norway Fire Hall, the service covers an area north to the Battle River bordering the City of Camrose Fire Service, south along Highways 611 and 609 triangulating down to Highway 56 and east to the Battle River. In the event of a rescue and/or motor vehicle collision (MVC), the service extends straight east to the end of the County district.
New Norway Fire Service is one of three fire departments in the County (including Camrose and Bashaw) that are full service with fire, rescue and medical assist.
“All members of the New Norway Hall are trained to the Medical First Responders (MFR)  level,” explained New Norway Fire Chief Ross Penner.
All members are on call 24/7 and are dispatched via pager and the Iam
Responding and WhatsApp systems. If members have not responded to the Iam
responding, they will shortly thereafter receive a WhatsApp message ensuring a high rate of response.
“As the fire chief, I  dispatch all calls coming in, no matter where I am (unless out of service  due to geographical location such as mountains). I stop where I am and what I am doing (whether that be working or otherwise) and work with 911 dispatch to get clear directions, details, and to call in additional resources that are needed. It is more efficient and doesn’t tie up other officers who are needed to respond to the call and deal with other matters.”
The average number of members responding to a fire or an MVC is 12 and, once enough members have responded, the rest are then requested by the Fire Chief to stand down.
Medical calls typically require four responding members and more often than not, due to their geographical proximity to the incident, New Norway Fire Hall members are first on scene rendering assistance until the arrival of Emergency Medical Services.
When responding to a call within the hamlet of New Norway, the average response time is seven minutes for first unit on scene and, outside of the village to most areas of the New Norway Fire district, the response is typically 12 minutes for first unit on scene.
Members
Members of the New Norway Fire Hall are all volunteer and outside of their time spent with the service, have careers and families.
The camaraderie among them is strong, not unlike many emergency services, and despite some friendly bantering and joking around, they all take their mandate to protect life and property very seriously.
Two members live in New Norway while all other members hail from areas within Camrose County.
Klayton Krangnes, the longest serving member, has been volunteering since 1997 and his warm, approachable manner is indicative of the attitude among all members.
Chief Penner has served with the organization for 10 years, first starting as an EMR (Emergency Medical Responder).
Most of the members started out in the Junior Member program, designed to offer those interested in volunteering with the New Norway Fire Service an early start at the age of 16.
“They attend all calls to assist and observe, which has them ready for full duties at the age of 18,” noted Penner.
The fleet
The New Norway Fire Service fleet consists of one tanker, one bush truck (3/4-ton pickup), one freight liner rescue and one freight liner pumper.
“On a fire and/or MVC call, all emergency vehicles respond and on a medical call, usually just the rescue truck responds.”
Annual stats
On an annual basis, the New Norway Fire Hall responds to approximately 25 per cent fire calls, 30 per cent MVC and 45 per cent medical.
Penner indicated that in his time on the fire service, he has noted a decrease in the amount of fire calls which he attributes to an increase in public awareness. “I also feel the Fort McMurray fires made people a lot more aware of the damage that can occur due to fire. It will destroy property. They have become a lot more vigilant about having fires or what causes fires.”
The New Norway Hall remains involved, as much as they can, with community and residential education programs in an effort to keep residents informed and aware for their own safety.
For more information or if you are interested in joining the New Norway Fire Service, contact Chief Penner at 780-608-8066. read more

9PM Routine assists in protecting property

By Lori Larsen

Alberta RCMP want to remind rural residents to follow the 9 PM Routine, an initiative implemented by police agencies around the world to help citizens protect their property.
Getting into a nightly routine of using a checklist, residents can ensure private property is properly secured.
Alberta RCMP advise residents that property crimes are crimes of opportunity and more often than not the simple gestures of putting things out of site and locked up and turning on lights can be enough to deter a would-be criminal.
RCMP report that from June to August of 2018 there were approximately 36,000 property related incidents in RCMP jurisdiction, much of which includes rural properties.
The following are some suggestions offered by the RCMP to include in a 9 PM Routine.
Light it up by turning on outside lights at night.
Lock it or risk losing it. Lock up your home, shed, garage, outbuildings, vehicles and other recreational vehicles including
bicycles.
Do not leave anything laying around in plain sight. If you do not have outbuildings or garages put items under a deck or hidden behind objects.
Never leave your keys in your vehicle. Remember criminals will check your glove box, visors and other popular hiding places for your keys.
Alberta RCMP will be posting reminders on social media for residents to get into the 9 PM Routine every night for the next few months.
Join the movement by using #9PMRoutine and following the RCMP social media accounts on Twitter @RCMPAlberta and Facebook @RCMPinAlberta.
Residents are also encouraged to call 911 if they observe anything suspicious. If you wish to remain anonymous, you can contact Crime Stoppers at 1-800-222-8477 (TIPS), online at www.P3Tips.com or by using the “P3 Tips” APP available through the Apple App or Google Play Store.
Have an enjoyable summer by helping yourself and the local RCMP keep you and your property safe.