Reflections

<strong>Reflections</strong>

By Bonnie Hutchinson

Do you need s “Schultz hour?”

A reception after a guest speaker. People mingling, picking up snacks, noticing people they know, introducing themselves to people they don’t know.
“Hi, how are you?” my friend says to someone she hasn’t seen for a couple of years. “Busy!” the woman replies. She says a few more words and moves on.
Ah yes. Busy. A badge of honour.
I flash back to a day I was rushing to the airport, in danger of missing a plane because I’d been busy trying to finish one more thing before I left, asking myself, “What is the terror of an unstructured moment?”
***
I appreciated a New York Times article by David Leonard called “You’re Too Busy. You Need a Schultz Hour.”
Back in the 1980s, when George Schultz was U.S. Secretary of State, he carved out one hour a week for quiet reflection. He sat down in his office with a pad of paper and pen, closed the door and gave instructions that he was not to be interrupted unless one of two people called–his wife or the president.
Schultz is now 96 years old. In his interview with Leonard, Schultz said his hour of solitude was the only way he could find time to think about the strategic aspects of his job. Otherwise, he would be constantly pulled into moment-to-moment tactical issues, never able to focus on larger questions of the national interest. The only way to do great work, in any field, is to find time to consider the larger questions.
***
Anyone in a leadership position–family, work or community–has probably experienced that pull. It’s easy to be so caught up in detail, moment-to-moment, that there’s no time to think about bigger questions.
Once in a conversation with an elected person for whom I had great respect, he talked about how that week’s meetings were scheduled back-to-back from 7 a.m. to 7 p.m., and there was still a stack of material to be read and absorbed before the next day of meetings that began at 7 a.m.
I said, “When do you have time to think?”
He smiled wryly.
It occurred to me that many of our most important public decisions are made by people who don’t have time to think.  That’s not intended to be a criticism of the people.  It is an observation.
***
Back in the 1980s, George Schultz had tumultuous pressures coming from around the globe, but he did not have a smartphone pummelling him with distractions 24/7. Even before smartphones, in the environments I was aware of in non-profit organizations and government departments, and that I heard about in corporations, frenetic busyness was highly prized. The busier you were, the more important you felt.
I did notice that sometimes the most senior people appeared to be less busy. That was not just because they had people around them to handle details. It was also because they carved out time to clear their minds. One senior boss I knew went for a walk every day at noon. No matter what the weather or lunch invitation, he was not available during that hour.
***
Leonard’s “Schultz Hour” article quotes psychologist Ampos Tversky as saying, “The secret to doing good research is always to be a little underemployed. You waste years by not being able to waste hours.”
Leonard says, “The science of the mind is clear about this point. Our brains can be in either ‘task-positive’ or ‘task-negative’ mode, but not both at once. Our brain benefits from spending time in each state. Task-positive mode allows us to accomplish something in the moment. Task-negative mode is more colloquially known as daydreaming, and, as Daniel J. Levitin of McGill University has written, it ‘is responsible for our moments of greatest creativity and insight, when we’re able to solve problems that previously seemed unsolvable.’ ”
I’ve now decided that the hours I “wasted” yesterday were actually clearing my mind!
***
I’d love to hear from you. If you have comments about this column or suggestions for future topics, send an e-mail to Bonnie@BonnieHutchinson.com and I’ll joyfully reply.

 

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Weavers AGM

By Lori Larsen

The annual Hand Weavers Spinners and Dyers of Alberta (HWSDA) general meeting was held at the University of Alberta Augustana Campus Forum and Faith and Life Chapel and Lounge on May 13.
Approximately 40 members from all over Alberta joined the meeting to hear on the annual report, visit local vendors at the conference and exchange information with a network of fellow artisans.
“This is the third time Camrose has hosted the meeting,” said Camrose chapter member Maria Lougheed.
The AGM also played host to several vendors displaying a variety of products, including yarns and wools showcasing wares from sheep farmers within Alberta.
Throughout the Faith and Life Chapel and Lounge, members displayed their finished crafts including a Canada 150 display featuring woven tartans representing all the Canadian provinces.
Dawn Lawson displayed a selection of spinning wheels throughout the forum.
Mayor Norm Mayer opened the AGM with welcome comments followed by the annual reports.
Visit www.hwsda.org for more information.

Open Door welcomes new executive director

By Lori Larsen

Camrose Open Door Association has welcomed a new executive director to the team. Jessica Hutton comes to Camrose with an extensive background working in non-profit organizations and shares her vision of continual growth for the organization.
“We do a lot of helping and we provide a lot of services,” said Hutton in speaking of the work at The Open Door. “We are back in the schools, back in places where the youth really are and our growth is starting already.”
Hutton indicated that one of the goals of The Open Door is to provide youth with more complicated programming. “We are seeing more complicated needs for the individual. Part of The Open Door is being able to respond to changing needs over the years. As youth change, the struggles they are having are also changing and our ability to be flexible and meet that is part of what we are also looking to do.”
Jessica’s experience includes behavior consulting, Victims’ Services advocacy, training, private counselling and organizational management. She has been responsible for the development and management of large scale programs for both youth and adults, including programs for individuals with Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorder.
“I come from a background of doing therapy and behavior specialist work, so I understand that prevention is the key. By working with youth, we are targeting exactly where we need to be on a path where we are not seeing them in a recurring cycle.”
Thus far, Hutton is very impressed with the support shown by the community for The Open Door program and for herself in the new position.
“I have never seen an organization where the community is so passionate about what we (The Open Door) do and they reach out in such an unbelievable way.
“That kind of support tells me that people know what we are doing and that they know it is needed in this community.”
Hutton added the youth whom she speaks with are saying good things about the services provided by The Open Door and what it has done for them. “The first day I was here, this young lady came in and told me how amazing this journey had been. She had been with us for a number of years and had just got herself a place in Edmonton, was moving and was going to be stable with a job.
“I can tell by what they (youth) are saying to me and what I am seeing happen and the stories I am getting everyday from the staff, that we are making a difference.”
In looking forward, Hutton reiterated the importance of the growth of the program
“We have the capacity to be much larger than what we are and that includes providing to outlying areas. Whether that is having a presence in the area or having the resources there.”
The Open Door will also be offering a Tenant Education program intended to assist youth with the ins and outs of successful renting.
“The staff have also told me there are some barriers around youth finding and keeping employment and that is something that I am going to be looking at and decide what are we going to do in the community to help.”
Hutton (through The Open Door) will also be addressing concerns of youth finishing school then leaving the community.
“There needs to be some discussion about succession planning. I think linking those two things together could be very beneficial to the community.”
On a final note, Hutton repeated how thankful she is for all the community involvement and the amazing team at The Open Door. “We have a really strong and passionate team – a team that is excited about growing That is going to be a huge piece in us moving forward.”

Open Door welcomes new executive director

By Lori Larsen

Camrose Open Door Association has welcomed a new executive director to the team. Jessica Hutton comes to Camrose with an extensive background working in non-profit organizations and shares her vision of continual growth for the organization.
“We do a lot of helping and we provide a lot of services,” said Hutton in speaking of the work at The Open Door. “We are back in the schools, back in places where the youth really are and our growth is starting already.”
Hutton indicated that one of the goals of The Open Door is to provide youth with more complicated programming. “We are seeing more complicated needs for the individual. Part of The Open Door is being able to respond to changing needs over the years. As youth change, the struggles they are having are also changing and our ability to be flexible and meet that is part of what we are also looking to do.”
Jessica’s experience includes behavior consulting, Victims’ Services advocacy, training, private counselling and organizational management. She has been responsible for the development and management of large scale programs for both youth and adults, including programs for individuals with Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorder.
“I come from a background of doing therapy and behavior specialist work, so I understand that prevention is the key. By working with youth, we are targeting exactly where we need to be on a path where we are not seeing them in a recurring cycle.”
Thus far, Hutton is very impressed with the support shown by the community for The Open Door program and for herself in the new position.
“I have never seen an organization where the community is so passionate about what we (The Open Door) do and they reach out in such an unbelievable way.
“That kind of support tells me that people know what we are doing and that they know it is needed in this community.”
Hutton added the youth whom she speaks with are saying good things about the services provided by The Open Door and what it has done for them. “The first day I was here, this young lady came in and told me how amazing this journey had been. She had been with us for a number of years and had just got herself a place in Edmonton, was moving and was going to be stable with a job.
“I can tell by what they (youth) are saying to me and what I am seeing happen and the stories I am getting everyday from the staff, that we are making a difference.”
In looking forward, Hutton reiterated the importance of the growth of the program
“We have the capacity to be much larger than what we are and that includes providing to outlying areas. Whether that is having a presence in the area or having the resources there.”
The Open Door will also be offering a Tenant Education program intended to assist youth with the ins and outs of successful renting.
“The staff have also told me there are some barriers around youth finding and keeping employment and that is something that I am going to be looking at and decide what are we going to do in the community to help.”
Hutton (through The Open Door) will also be addressing concerns of youth finishing school then leaving the community.
“There needs to be some discussion about succession planning. I think linking those two things together could be very beneficial to the community.”
On a final note, Hutton repeated how thankful she is for all the community involvement and the amazing team at The Open Door. “We have a really strong and passionate team – a team that is excited about growing That is going to be a huge piece in us moving forward.”

Residents line up for garden plots

By Lori Larsen

On May 17, residents lined up outside of the City of Camrose community services department waiting to purchase (rent) a garden plot.
The community garden plots are 15 by 15 (feet), limited to one per person (family) and are located just east of Parkview Drive at the city nursery between 39 Avenue and Mount Pleasant drive.
Anxious gardeners lined up as early as 6 a.m. in hopes of acquiring their favourite plot of the 60 that are available.
With the plots already tilled by the City, gardeners began working the plots as soon as they were purchased.
The City provides a water source for gardeners who are responsible for weeding and caring for their own plots and are required at the end of the season to clean up their plots.

Camrose mosaic
mural going to
pieces

Camrose mosaic<br>mural going to<br>pieces
Mayor Norm Mayer presents Father Jacques Vaillancourt with a copy of the Mosaic Mural puzzle.

By Lori Larsen

The Camrose Canada 150 Celebratory Mosaic Mural that hangs in the Camrose Recreation Centre consists of hundreds of 4 inch by 4 inch hand painted tiles completed by members of the community ranging in all ages. It was unveiled on Jan. 1 to commemorate the beginning of Canada 150 celebrations.
While anyone can enjoy the masterpiece from a distance, Father Jacques Vaillancourt of St. Andrews Anglican Church, thought it would be a wonderful idea to offer a smaller version, in the form of a puzzle, as a challenging hobby and ideal keepsake for Camrose and area residents.
Mayor Norm Mayer read an email to councillors during the regular council meeting on May 15, received from Father Jacques Vaillancourt suggesting the city consider producing a puzzle to sell during the Canada 150 celebrations.
Mayor Mayer quoted Vaillancourt’s email “I could see residents buying one for themselves, family and friends throughout the year long Canada 150 celebrations. Even if the venture fiscally broke even, when all is said and done, it would promote an awareness of our fine community.”
Mayor Mayer presented Father Vaillancourt, a copy of a jigsaw puzzle (commissioned by the City) of the Canada 150 commemorative plaque (mosaic) hanging in the Recreation Centre.
The puzzle will be available for sale at City Hall, the Recreation Centre, Community Centre, Chuck MacLean Arts Centre and various city locations.

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Options scam

By Lori Larsen

Camrose Police Service would like to warn residents of an online scam that is defrauding Canadians out of billions of dollars.
As per the Alberta Securities Commission website. “Binary options are “bets” as to whether the value of an asset or stock will increase or decrease in a fixed (and often very short) period of time – similar to online gambling. In reality, most of these websites are fraudulent. In gambling terms, “the house always wins” meaning you lose.”
Binary options promise low-risk, high-reward investment opportunities through online advertisements, emails, social media and over the telephone.
Any company or person offering securities within Canada must be registered and there are no binary options dealers registered in Alberta or Canada so anyone offering these options are doing so illegally.
The websites binary options are being offered on are often well designed and appear legitimate and the majority of the online trading platforms are located overseas and are fraudulent with no actual trading occurring, the transaction is merely for the purpose of stealing money.
Similar to other scams, the con artists (firms) offering these fraudulent binary options use a variety of aliases and misdirection techniques and may offer free or bonus money to entice victims to open an account.
Police ask that citizens be aware and do not offer any personal or credit information to anyone or company you are not totally familiar with and trust, be it online, by telephone, email or in person.
The Alberta Securities Commission offers these tips in avoiding being defrauded out of your money.
If it sounds too good to be true, it is likely not true.
Never give out personal or credit information to someone you do not know or trust.
Never make a hurried investment decision.
Be suspicious. After all it is your money.
Low-risk, high-return investments do not exist. All investments offer some level of risk.
If you have been approached by a binary options company or believe you have been the target of a securities scam contact the Alberta Securities Commission at toll free 1-877-355-4488 or inquiries@asc.ca.

City council revisits the naturalization project

By Lori Larsen

During the May 15 City of Camrose regular council meeting, councillors in a six to two vote, approved option three, with modifications, of four choices regarding the Camrose Drive Berm Naturalization project.
Councillors discussed in length the four options presented by administration in a report.
Option one: Continuing with the naturalization of the berm as planned in stages over the next three to five years to just north of 54 Avenue.
Option two: Returning all sections of the berm along Camrose Drive/68 Street to a routine mowed area with no additional trees than the present trees.
Option three: Retain select areas of the berm as naturalized where the slopes are wider and further away from residents and return other areas where the berm is narrow and very close to residents back to mowed. Any further consideration for naturalized areas would involve a direct pubic consultation such as neighbourhood meetings with direct door to door advertising prior to proceeding.
Option four: to allow the grass to grow long each season on the entire berm of select locations as per Option one and three, but mow/mulch the long grass prior to winter each year.
In the public commentary prior to discussion by council, Rajan Rathnavalu spoke to council about the recent public forum held on April 9.
“I had initially thought the public consultation would be simply providing information and clarifying what is the right decision to do and then go ahead,” said Rathnavalu. “It turned out to be more of a listening exercise. There were a lot of strong feelings about the naturalization and the depth of those feelings surprised me.
“If we are to move forward on a interdependent  and wholistic manner, members of the community on all sides need to be a part of that equation.”
Rathnavalu drew a few conclusions from the public meeting. Firstly, that he heard no person speak out against ecology and that all share a common regard for the importance of protecting our environment.
He explained that, in his opinion, it is easy to cut the grass on the berm and it is likewise easy not to cut the grass on the berm, but that both require less attentive care.
“The call is to be very thoughtful about these green spaces and to be attentive to the complexity of those situations. How we can use different complex natural ecosystems in very specific places for very specific purposes.”
Rathnavalu indicated that the common position by all parties was  “Everyone wants it (the berm) to be cared for and everyone wants to feel like it is being thoughtfully attended.”
Council’s thoughts
During discussion on the options presented by administration, councillors voiced their opinions.
Councillor Bill Sears began with a motion as per the recommendation made by administration that council approve option one of the report, seconded by councillor Greg Wood.
City of Camrose community services general manager, Ryan Poole explained that administration’s recommendation was based on what other major cities have been doing for approximately 20 years in regards to naturalization and that the process has proven to be successful.
Councillor Sears noted that the naturalization project in Camrose involves more that just the Camrose Drive berm.
“We seemed to have lost sight of what we were trying to do when we first started talking about the benefits of naturalization.
“There is a plan and it has been here from the start. It includes tree planting, grass planting, weed control and looking after those trees,” said Sears. “I am little disappointed that we are having this discussion when we supported it all along. We had one bad year/experience and now we seem to be throwing the whole plan out.
“The recommendation of administration is we carry on with the plan as we discussed and we learn from our mistakes. We make some changes so we don’t have those same issues in the future but we carry on with the plan as it was laid out and we will see the benefits of that down the road.”
Councillor Kevin Hycha voiced his support for option three indicating council has a responsibility to represent the city as a whole. “We have heard it loud and clear from others that they are not liking it (naturalization specifically on the berm.) I am trying  to look for a middle ground here. I support naturalization I just wonder if Camrose Drive is the place for it.”
Hycha suggested the City perfect areas that come out of the river valley to show the public what naturalization would look like in three to five years.
Councillor Wayne Throndson also supported option three proposing some modifications including more consultation with the residents directly affected by naturalization.
Councillor PJ Stasko supported option three with some modification, as a middle ground to try to satisfy both sides of the issue.
In support of naturalization and likely option three, councillor Agnes Hoveland questioned Poole as to how other municipalities handled the concern of naturalization areas abutting directly onto residential areas.
Poole provided examples of areas within Edmonton where naturalization areas go directly to the fence lines of residences.
City of Camrose parks director Chris Clarkson explained that the naturalization plan included mowing a strip on the berm against the fence line of residences, along the roadside and the back slope along the areas where the berm slopes back down towards the residences.
Councillor Max Lindstrand would support option one with an amendment. “It would include continuing with our timeline but looking at some of the suggestions of doing it differently so it would be more appealing to people.
“But also I would be comfortable with option three. Slow things down and take some time in that three to five year window so these areas can prove themselves to be attractive  spaces before we continue our project to completion.”
In support of option one councillor Greg Wood noted that the present plan included compromise with the cutting back of the slopes in an effort to reduce migration of vermin into the properties of residents abutting the naturalized areas.
The motion to accept the recommendation by administration for council to accept option one was defeated.
Option three was then discussed in length with councillor Throndson making a motion, seconded by councillor Stasko, for council to approve option three with an amendment to include administration (parks dept.) devising a plan for the implementation of option three that would include further public consultation and administration input.
Throndson suggested administration have the plan prepared for review and approval at the regular council meeting to be held on June 12.
A motion for council to approve option three and that implementation of option three be delayed until the parks department brings back an implementation plan to council for review and approval was carried.

Beauty and the Beast Jr. allows junior high actors to shine

By Murray Green

Disney’s Beauty and the Beast award-winning animated film and stage play comes to life in this romantic and beloved take on the classic fairy tale in a version featuring middle school students from Charlie Killam School.
Shows will be held at the Jeanne and Peter Lougheed Performing Arts Centre on May 29 and 30 at 7 p.m.
“This features our Grade 6 to 8 students, who have been working on this production since October,” said teacher Sabrina Heydorn, one of two teachers overseeing the drama students.
It is based on the original Broadway production that ran for over 13 years and was nominated for multiple awards. It is an adaptation of the story of transformation and tolerance.
“We picked Beauty and the Beast because it is one of my favourite Disney productions. We wanted something that involved more work for a bigger challenge with multiple sets, characters and costumes. It involves a lot more detail (compared to last year’s production of The Lion King),” said teacher Rhonda Basque.
The classic story tells of Belle, a young woman in a provincial town, and the Beast, who is really a young prince trapped under the spell of an enchantress. If the Beast can learn to love and be loved, the curse will end and he will be transformed to his former self. But time is running out. If the Beast does not learn his lesson soon, he and his household will be doomed for all eternity.
Although the production also has 30 students, the same as last year, the roles are more challenging.
“It seemed like we were going to need more characters, because there were more individuals instead of groups of animals. Now, everyone is a character and the students have more time on stage as individuals. It is a busier play,” said Basque.
“It gives the students more responsibilities, more of a challenge and something different than last year,” added Heydorn. “Every single student has at least one or two lines, which gives them time to shine on their own.”
The timing with a new Disney release helped the students. “The students have watched both versions, so they understand how the animation roles were adapted to the human side. It gives them more background knowledge,” said Basque.
Picking students to play certain characters fell into place. “We made fantastic choices. Your show is only as strong as the weakest link and all of the students have been wonderful. We don’t have any weak links,” said Heydorn.
“Our beauty and our beast are going to be fantastic because they worked well together last year and will again,” added Basque.
Nalyn Tindall as Belle and Nicole Poepping as the Beast will lead the talented cast.
With many fun supporting roles, it allows students to play objects inside the castle. This tale is filled with spectacular costume and set opportunities.
“It wasn’t as basic, so more details had to be worked out,” said Heydorn.
“We involved more parents with costumes and set designs. We borrowed costumes, so it has been more community support this time.”
Last year, two school shows were sold out, so the tickets will be going fast.

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Beauty and the Beast Jr. allows junior high actors to shine
Ecole Charlie Killam School students prepare for the production of Beauty and the Beast Jr. at the Jeanne and Peter Lougheed Performing Arts Centre on May 29 and 30. Around the table, from back row left to right, Taylor Brady as Cogsworth, Marissa de Hoog as Mrs. Potts, Bella Hoppe as Babette and Jacob Tigchelaar as Lumière. Front from left, Nalyn Tindall as Belle and Nicole Poepping as Beast share a drink at the table.

Prairie West Fiddle Contest to be held at Bailey Theatre

Prairie West Fiddle Contest to be held at Bailey Theatre
FIDDLE CHAMPION Murray Green, Camrose Booster Strome’s Ethan Harty, a Grand North American Old Time Fiddle Championship winner, practices for the Prairie West Fiddle Championships to be held at the Bailey Theatre on June 9 and 10. An open dance will be held on the Friday evening prior to the championships on Saturday.

By Murray Green

The Prairie West Fiddle Contest, Alberta’s newest fiddle event, will be featuring players from across Western Canada to showcase their skills and compete for prizes.
“Quite a few years ago, fiddle concerts were a pretty big deal in this area and across Canada. The fiddles were brought here by Europeans and played a lot because it was a very portable instrument. Fiddle contests were started as a way for players to come together to learn new tunes and work towards a goal of winning and getting better,” said Ethan Harty of Strome, a Grand North American Old Time Fiddle Championship winner. “The Prairie West Fiddle Contest is a way of bringing that back.”
The 15-year-old is a throwback to the old-style of fiddle playing. “He has that old soul of loving music in him,” said his mother Marie. “The younger generation wanted to revive more concerts as a way of sharing their love for music. Last year, the Grand Masters Contest came to Alberta, the first time ever to be held in the province. There was lots of enthusiasm over that and it inspired some younger players to encourage that kind of atmosphere and calibre of playing in Alberta.”
Ethan has been invited to attend this year’s Grand Master Event in Quebec. “From a young age, I always liked to play the fiddle because I love the music and I like to make the music. My favourites include Tony Michael and Calvin Vollrath,” said the Grade 9 Daysland School student.
He attended a Vollrath camp in St. Paul in his first start at lessons and learning the instrument.
“From there, he met some talented players like Daniel Gervais, Tyler Vollrath, Byron and his father Alfie Myhre,” said mother Marie. “Alfie is going to be the emcee for the contest. It is good to have this event at the Bailey Theatre. It motivates you on stage when you have a venue like this.”
Calvin Vollrath, Byron Myhre and Deanna Dolstra will be judges.
“We can take a maximum of 40 entries and we are half full already,” she added. “That’s great because fiddlers tend to just show up the morning of the competition.”
A Welcome Showcase and Dance will start off the weekend on Friday, June 9 at 7 p.m. with admission by donation at the Bailey Theatre. “This won’t be as formal. Fiddlers will play songs they won’t be able to play in the competition,” said Ethan, who enters about five competitions a year.
The preliminary competition begins Saturday, June 10 at 10 a.m. They start with a preliminary round in age groups, junior 12 and under, youth of 17 and under, adults 18 to 54 and then seniors 55 and older.
“A set for juniors is three tunes. They play a waltz, a jig and a reel, which is the fastest,” Ethan explained. “In the youth and up categories, a fourth song is added, which is a tune of choice. You could add a polka or show tune. The tune of choice really shows your style of play and sets you apart from others. It is a chance to show off your ability. There is an element of difficulty, but most important is how well you play.”
The top performers will be asked back for the final championship and show at 7 p.m.
“Three from each age category will move on to the championship show. They have to play different songs than they did during the day,” said Ethan.
In the first year of the event, the Harty family is trying to attract fiddlers from western Canada. They want to make this a yearly showcase.
“This is a chance for all of the top players to play and is an opportunity to hear the top fiddlers, regardless of age or categories,” shared Marie.
Tickets are available online at www.bailey theatre.com/tickets, at the Bailey Box Office 5041-50 Street from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. and 3 to 5 p.m. or by phoning 780-672-5510.

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BRSD to host information night on Christian-based public education

By Murray Green

If you would like to see a Christian-based public school experience for your children in Camrose, then attend an information night on Wednesday, May 31 at 7 p.m. in the Library of Chester Ronning School.
A Logos (translation: Jesus is the word of God) Christian Program is being proposed by the Battle River School Division. The faith-based program would be a non-denominational education program that provides the instruction of the Alberta curriculum within a Christian context.
“Like all public school divisions, we have moved away from any religious instruction in classrooms because our society is far more multicultural now,” said Diane Hutchinson, BRSD community relations advisor.
“We can’t assume that everyone, or anyone, comes from the same religious background. However, within the public school system, parents can ask for specific things to be included in the educational program. We have Cornerstone Christian School which is very focused on a Christian philosophy where it is like a Christian immersion experience. Every year, we have parents in Camrose, and staff too, that ask if there is any interest in offering Christian-based programming,” she explained. “The purpose of this information night is to ask the question if there is interest in a Christian-based program in Camrose.”
The Logos program would be offered at Chester Ronning School in a Christian values focused classroom alongside traditional program classes in a community school setting.
“If you live anywhere in Camrose, you could go to Chester Ronning School  to  attend the Logos classroom. Right now, we have attendance areas for each school that are closed. Three years after the movement of Grade 6 students to Charlie Killam School, we agreed to look at attendance areas again. Those talks are going to happen again next year.”
The Logos program provides a solid foundation, with a strong academic focus, in a caring Christian environment; activities such as a morning prayer, Bible reading and daily devotions; nurturing and reinforcing spiritual values. Students will be encouraged to lead productive, compassionate lives and develop strong commitments to families and local communities.
“We are asking what grade, or grades and if offering a split class to start the program is acceptable.”
The BRSD offers a range of programs to help ensure students and families have a positive experience at school.
“We started French immersion and the Cornerstone Christian School began because of parent requests, so we will listen to what people have to say about Logos,” said Diane.
BRSD will discuss the plans in more detail and answer questions at the meeting Wednesday evening.

Junior high to hold spring band concert

By Murray Green

École Charlie Killam School will be holding a Music Program Spring Concert featuring students from Grade 6 to 8  on Wednesday, May 24, beginning at 7 p.m. in the Jeanne and Peter Lougheed Performing Arts Centre.
“This is our Spring Concert featuring performances by our Grade 6, Grade 7 and Grade 8 concert bands as well as our choir, Jazz Ensemble, and a couple of chamber ensembles,” said Bob Bailey, band director at ECKS.
“The concert bands just returned from the Alberta Band Association Provincial Festival of Bands in Red Deer, where all three of them received grades of superior, which is the highest mark available,” said Mr. Bailey.
To purchase tickets visit the Lougheed Arts Centre website at www.camroselive.ca or call the Lougheed Box Office at 780-608-2922 Monday to Friday from 9 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. and Saturday from 1 to 4:30 p.m. It is also open one hour prior to all performances.

BMO celebrates 112th anniversary

By Murray Green

It has been 112 years since BMO (Bank of Montreal) opened a branch in Camrose.
Back on May 31, 1905 the bank rented part of R.B. Price’s general store to start operations in the Hamlet of Sparling. The hamlet only had 50 people, but it showed promise of growing and BMO helped make that happen.
“We want to celebrate the anniversary on May 31 from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. with a barbecue and cake outside of our branch We want you to join us,” said current manager Tricia Cameron. “The proceeds from the barbecue will be going to the Battle River Community Foundation.”
The first manager, Frank Pike, came to Camrose from Wetaskiwin on horseback with money in his saddlebags. Later that year the hamlet became a village and in 1907 the Town of Camrose (hill of roses) was formed. That same year the construction of a new bank building was completed on Main Street.
The branch was perfectly situated about 30 miles from Wetaskiwin and 60 miles from Edmonton.
Frank’s brother James Pike took over as manager in 1910. F. W. Anderson was appointed manager following the amalgamation for a year.
BMO was originally a branch of the Merchants Bank of Canada, but merged with the Bank of Montreal in 1922.
J. G. Robinson became the manager until E. A. Rostad was named to the position in 1936. After 10 years, early in 1946, H. C. Miller became the manager and he searched for a new location.
By 1948, the branch required a larger building and in March 1951 they purchased the 1928-built Masonic Building (now Inspirations) at the corner of 50 Avenue and 50 Street.
D. V. Gilmour was the new manager in 1949, followed by Dan Purcell in 1958, Jack A. Barr in 1962, J. D. Roddis in 1972, Lyle J. Moore in 1976 and Hugh McKinnon in 1980.
Growing with the city, the branch then moved to the current location at 4906-50 Street in 1993.
Today, with a population over 18,000, it is still a vibrant growing city and also features a strong agricultural area surrounding it.

Camrose Heritage Railway
Station and Park to host plant sale, craft workshop

By Lori Larsen

On May 13, the Camrose Heritage Railway Station and Park opened its doors for a season packed full of fun and adventure.
During the opening, guests were able to explore the many artifacts and displays of the station museum, shop at the White Elephant Gift Shop, enjoy homemade goodies and tea, take a ride on the Percy-like train or just sit and enjoy the tunes of local musicians gathered to entertain in the Tea Room.
On May 27, the station will once again be hosting the plant sale and swap from 10 a.m. until 5 p.m. People are invited to purchase or swap the Station garden plants or bring in plant donations to be purchased or swapped. Any items that can be used in the gift shop are graciously accepted. The White Elephant gift shop is open Tuesdays to Saturdays.
A knowledgeable gardener will also be on hand to assist with any gardening questions you may have. Carrot cake and beverages will be available for purchase.
On June 7, the Save the Earth Day will be hosted at the Meeting Creek station from 9:30 a.m. until 3 p.m. Grade 4 and 5 students will learn about social studies, environmental science and aboriginal curriculum. Students will have an opportunity to learn about the history of the buildings with hands-on discovery and role-playing characters.
On Saturday, June 17 from 1 until 3 p.m. the station will be hosting a unique crafting experience. The flower dye art craft involves transferring the natural dyes of flowers and plants onto water colour paper. The end results are some unique works of art that can be created into bookmarks, gifts, tags, handmade cards, even small pictures. Attendees will be required to bring a hammer. The workshop is open to residents six years and older. Children must be accompanied by an adult.
For more information contact the station at 780-672-3099.

Rib-tickling, lip-smacking good time

By Lori Larsen

If you cannot resist mouth-watering ribs combined with a dose of laughter and all for a good cause, then the annual Rotary Club of Camrose Daybreak Rib Tickler is just what you need.
The Rib Tickler fund-raiser will be held on Thursday, June 8 in the Camrose Resort Casino ballroom. Doors will open at 5:30 p.m. with dinner served at 6:30 p.m.
‘This will be the fourth annual Rib Tickler,” said Carol Davies-Pedersen. “It is called Rib Tickler because we serve ribs and we have something  (entertainment) to tickle your funny bone.”
This year, the club has booked the Heebee Jeebees, a soulful acapella singing and comedy act from Calgary who pride themselves with infusing fun and comedy into their songs.
The evening will also include a silent auction and a chance to purchase tickets to be put into draw boxes for items such as a bar fridge full of wine, a small freezer of meat, a half-share of Carol’s CSA Garden and the three-month lease of a vehicle from a local dealer.
Tickets for the Rib Tickler are available at the front desk of Royal LePage Rose Country Realty.
For more information on the Rotary Club of Camrose Daybreak, visit the webpage at camrosedaybreakrotary.org.

Young role model for children

By Lori Larsen

Working with younger children is something 16-year-old Jemma Lauder thoroughly enjoys and may possibly be something she might pursue later in life. At an early age herself, Jemma began to understand the gratification in helping others, especially youth.
“I started volunteering when I was pretty young,” said Jemma. “I think I was about 11 or 12 when I started helping with jump rope (a sport she is involved with). My sister was a coach and I helped her with the younger participants.
“I really like helping with the little kids.”
At 13 years old Jemma began working with the summer programs at the Camrose Aquatic Centre. “I started volunteering with the Little Explorers group, which are the four to seven-year-olds.
“I did that for three years and the first two years I was there almost every day because I really enjoyed it and it was just so much fun for me.”
Continuing her love for working with children and acting as a positive role model, last summer Jemma worked for the Creative Arts program.
“There were children there that didn’t really get along, so I liked putting them together and encouraging them to become friends. I showed them how important it was to share it and tried to teach them that it can make another person’s day by just one simple thing and I really try to make sure they don’t fight.”
With an interest in psychology, Jemma may try to pursue work in the field of child and youth care with a mandate of being able to assist children in need by ensuring they are living in a good home life, something Jemma feels all children deserve.
“There were children who would be there (at the Creative Arts Program) that were sad and it was so good to be able to help them and make them happy.”
Jemma recalls a specific incident when helping with a young boy in the jump rope sport (Camrose Spirals).
“In my first year of jump roping there was a young boy who, if he was having a bad day wouldn’t want to do anything so it was really nice to be able to help him out and get him back to jumping.
“When I coach I get the youngest group of children every year.”
Besides coaching and working with youth Jemma is also an active volunteer in Camrose and is in her second year in the Our Lady Mount Pleasant (OLMP) leadership class.
“When I was in Grade 9 I was in the Interact Rotary Club (presently not operating) and we helped out with things around the town, such as coat checking at the casino. We also  went on a service trip to Phoenix, (AZ) and helped out with the homeless. We sorted donations and read books to children who were in a shelter.”
Her involvement in the OLMP leadership class also has her contributing far beyond that of many adults.
“I did Relay for Life last year and lots of fundraiser and currently I am leading a fundraiser for the stain glass window at the St. Francis Xavier Catholic Church.” Part of which involves Jemma speaking to classes at the school and the church groups.
“Last year with Leadership we went to the Mustard Seed in Edmonton twice and volunteered there, making and serving supper for less fortunate people. Then for an hour or two we sat around with the people and talked about their experiences and just got to know a lot of people there.”
Jemma related that this was one of her favourite leadership activities. “You can see how people can go from living in a house then the next day are on the streets and how thankful they are for just getting a small meal.
“There was this one man who I talked to for about an hour and he explained to me how he was living in this house and then without notice he was told to leave and he had some sort of medical condition so he couldn’t work making it difficult for him to earn money,” she said with a mature amount of empathy.
This year Jemma is also part of the Enviroventure Club at OLMP. “We go around the school on our different shifts and empty recycle bins to help out the janitor.” The club also did trail cleaning in Banff.
Beyond the volunteering aspect of the Leadership Class, students are also taught invaluable lessons on how to be effective leaders.
“I am the leader of a school dance happening next week. As leaders we have to make the schedules for ticket selling, sell tickets and organize and take part in the set up and clean up for the dance.”
Jemma noted that the class has taught her not only leading and self confidence but giving to others pays back in dividends far beyond class credits.
“Helping others out if you are upset makes you a little happier. Seeing a smile on someone else’s  face really helps you out.”
Who do you know as a community Difference Maker? Let us know. Call The Camrose Booster at 780-672-3142.

Professional Advisor's Luncheon assists BRCF

By Murray Green

Financial advisors in Camrose gathered to assist the Battle River Community Foundation during a Professional Advisors Luncheon at the Camrose Heritage Railway Station and Park on May 17.
“Once again we gather and partner to make a difference. Giving is not just about making a donation, giving is about making a difference,” said chair Vivianne Grue. “We greatly appreciate your continued support of this event and more importantly your support of our mission to provide a vehicle to accept and manage funds of community minded folks, creating a permanent legacy that benefits the community and fosters a spirit of giving.”
She thanked everyone on two fronts. “First, your support to increase the administrative endowment fund. At the close of business in 2016, through your generosity and the generosity of others, we had close to $1 million in our administrative endowment fund. Secondly and most importantly, thank you for the role you play in advising potential donors of the Foundation and the role it can play in meeting their wishes.”
Vivianne introduced the  BRCF board. Past past chair and ambassador  Ken Drever, past chair and continuing board member Blain Fowler, vice-chair David Ofrim, secretary Mike Rodin, treasurer, Imogene Walsh, directors Kevin Gurr, Jim Hampshire, Marshall Wideman and Darryl Schultz.
Last week, Vivianne had the opportunity to attend a Community Foundations of Canada conference at which Gov. Gen. David Johnston addressed the gathering. These are just a few of the things he had to share with her.
“Six years ago at your national conference I invited community foundations from across the country to help build a smarter, more caring country. With open hearts and minds you have exceeded all expectations. Your efforts to build communities where everyone belongs have flourished with more than ninety per cent of Canadian communities now having access to a community foundation. Together, as a movement, you are a force for generosity, innovation, dialogue and caring among neighbours.
“We must make giving not a switch Canadians turn on when something catches their attention and then off when their attention drifts to something else. We should make giving intrinsic and innate so that we give simply because it’s established right behaviour.”
Three ideas to accomplish this come to mind. “We must make giving as uncomplicated as possible. We must identify and stress the qualities we share as a means of encouraging greater giving. We must open up more avenues for people to give of their time, talent and treasure,” said Vivianne. “The greatest act of giving is to encourage others to give. I call it widening the circle of giving.”
She told the guests that “As professional advisors,  you play a singularly important role in helping widen the circle of giving and helping your clients realize and create a personal philanthropic vision.”
Making a charitable gift is a very personal decision. With eighty-four per cent of Canadians contributing to charity on an annual basis, charitable giving is becoming an increasingly important part of your clients’ overall financial plans.
Research shows only seven per cent of Canadians would leave money to charity in their will, in the absence of a specific discussion around charitable giving. However, if the issue is raised with them, when drawing up a will or financial plan, the figure rises to twenty-seven per cent, more than a three-fold increase.
“Now that’s widening the circle of giving,” said Vivianne. “These statistics really drive home the significant impact each of you as professional advisors can have on planting the seeds for charitable giving in the minds of your clients, or being able to assist those who come with their own ideas, and to facilitate making their wishes  come true. In these sensitive discussions between advisor and client, you are privy to clients charitable giving interests and motivations. You are the ones best able to match their personal charitable interests with financial planning needs.”
Donors noted that upon consultation with some of their expert financial planners, many experts were  not aware of the existence of community foundations. These experts were promoting other avenues such as establishing a private foundation. When donors themselves did further research, and spoke to others, they felt the Community Foundation better met their needs and desires, keeping giving simple and straightforward, while still accomplishing their philanthropic wishes.
“I thought that was interesting to note. It also reinforced for me, the importance of keeping our professional advisors informed of community foundations and the role they can play for their client, said Vivianne. “A community foundation is most often just the right vehicle for meeting donors’ wishes since it can grant to all sectors far and wide and go on granting year after year thus creating a true legacy gift.”
In addition, BRCF has the grant making expertise. “Thus, the relationship between professional advisors and the Community Foundation is key to enhancing the service we provide to individuals who want to give back to their communities. Together we can make giving easy. Everyone wins when we work together. Advisors forge deeper client relationships. Clients benefit from tax advantages. And our communities are better supported, all through effective charitable giving. Never underestimate the impact of the funds granted, they do make a difference.”

Arts season ends with several incredible shows

By Murray Green

Dance FX will be holding its annual Year End Recital at the Jeanne and Peter Lougheed Performing Arts Centre on Saturday, June 3 at 11 a.m. and 5:30 p.m.
Of Being Earnest
Our Lady of Mount Pleasant will be bringing The Importance of Being Earnest to the stage. It is a trivial comedy for serious people, by Oscar Wilde. It’s the story of two bachelors, John ‘Jack’ Worthing and Algernon Moncrieff, who create alter egos named Ernest to escape their tiresome lives. They attempt to win the hearts of two women who, conveniently, claim to only love men called Ernest.
The plot unfolds on Thursday, June 6 at 7 p.m.
Dance Extravaganza
It’s the Ballet Camrose’s turn to hit the stage on Saturday, June 10 with a show beginning at 6:30 p.m. at the Lougheed Centre.
Dancers will showcase numbers in ballet, pointe, jazz, contemporary, modern, hip hop, lyrical, acro and tap routines.
Sleeping Beauty
Ballet Camrose returns the next day, Sunday, June 11, for their version of the classic Sleeping Beauty. The show has a 2 p.m. start.
This is a full length ballet performed by the students of Ballet Camrose.
Tickets for all events are available at camroselive.ca or by calling the Lougheed Centre box office at 780-608-2922.

Debnam creates classic 70s machine

By Murray Green

There is something about a Chevrolet Nova that screams power, class and style.
It is the perfect car that looks like a daily driver, but out performs other vehicles on the road.
 “I built this 1972 Nova three years ago and now I drive it all of the time. I was looking for one for about 15 years. I came across this one in a barn and it sat there for 20 years. I had a 1969 GTO, but as soon as I found this one, I sold it and built this one,” said Charlie Debman of Bittern Lake.
“I built this car in three weeks. It was a bare roller when I bought it. We (a bunch of friends) put in a new differential, transmission, engine, exhaust and the whole nine yards,” he explained. “I went from a car out of a barn to driving it home in three weeks with the help of my daughter’s boyfriend J.J. It was a lot of blood, sweat and tears in a short time frame.”
The 1962 Chevy II was deliberately never intended to be revolutionary in concept or execution; its mission was to give Chevrolet buyers a simple, back-to-the-basics compact car. Ultimately, the Nova badge would replace Chevy II, but that wouldn’t happen until 1969.
The car had an economical six cylinder motor and powerglide automatic. “It is now a 468 engine big block Chevy. I like to go fast,” chuckled Charlie on the move to the larger engine. “A lady bought it new at Don Wheaton Chevrolet. The whole chassis is built for racing, it just looks like a stock Nova.”
He enjoys entering 100-footer competitions. “I won the two events we had in Camrose. My dream was to play with my car and enter some events and shows,” added Charlie. “My GTO had a 396, so I wanted something that could go.”
The 1972 Nova received only minor trim changes from the previous year. The Rally Sport option with special suspension returned and was a rather popular choice, with 33,319 sold. Super Sport equipment went on 12,309 coupes, some of which also had the Rally package. Nova production moved to Norwood, Ohio, where it would be assembled alongside the Camaro.
At mid-year a sunroof option became available on two-door models. Also, the optional Strato bucket seats available on coupes switched from the previous low-back design with adjustable headrests to the high back units with built-in headrests introduced the previous year on Camaros and Vegas. Despite the lack of change, Nova had its best sales season in years, with production of the 1972 models reaching 349,733. Of these, 139,769 had the six-cylinder engine. The cost of the new cars were between $2,375 to $2,400, depending on features.
Charlie is the vice-president of the LowLifes Car Club in Camrose. “I wanted a sleeper car (looks like a normal car, but has extra power). I wanted to be able to drive it daily, weather permitting. I put on a couple of thousand miles a year in the summer.”
He had the car appraised last August at $20,000. “Going from a $2,000 car to a $20,000 classic in three weeks is a pretty good investment,” he shared. “It is an original 67,000-mile car.”
As a member  of the car club, he takes his Nova to various shows in the area. “Our club travels to where ever we can,” said Charlie. That includes the Camrose Show ‘N Shine on July 1 and the Round Hill show in September.

Drive responsibly on the road, safety first

By Murray Green

Highways, streets and  country roads all have countless numbers of drivers every day.
Distracted drivers put everyone at risk. National Road Safety Week, May 16 to 22 was created to raise awareness of distracted drivers.
“It’s hard to overstate the importance of distracted driving awareness,” said Jack Smith, president of the Canada Safety Council. “This is a serious problem on Canadian roads. We live in a society where people believe it’s important to be in contact at all times, whether it’s with work, family, or friends. But the world won’t stop spinning if you let a phone call go to voicemail, or take a little longer than usual to answer a text message or an email. Keep your attention squarely where it belongs: on the road.”
A distracted driver can be described as any driver whose sole focus is not on the road. This can include, but is not limited to cell phone use (whether handheld or hands-free) eating or grooming behind the wheel, reading and using a Global Positioning System (GPS.) All these behaviours can lead to slower reaction time, impaired judgment and can ultimately be responsible for collisions, injuries and even fatalities.
“Anything that distracts or impairs your ability to drive puts drivers, passengers, pedestrians and other road users at risk,” said Zac Stevenson, public relations advisor with State Farm Canada. “Drivers should always strive to be alert and focused while on the road. Distracted driving is a very serious threat to the safety of all road users. As a leading insurer, we’re proud to support partners like Canada Safety Council in bringing further awareness to this issue.”
The statistics don’t lie and in the case of distracted driving they paint a pretty dark picture. According to the Canadian Automobile Association, distraction is a factor in approximately four million motor vehicle crashes across North America every year. Studies have repeatedly shown a majority of road users admit to driving distracted, but a majority also do not believe themselves to be part of the problem.
Texting drivers are also 23 times more likely to be involved in a crash, or near crash than a non-distracted driver. And, according to the National Highway Traffic Safety administration, distraction affects 10 per cent of fatal crashes, 15 per cent of injury crashes and 14 per cent of all police-reported motor vehicle traffic crashes.
In Canada, though data is slightly more limited, estimates from the Traffic Injury Research Foundation suggest approximately 25 per cent of collisions in 2013 as being related to driver distraction. The groups most likely to be distracted in fatal crashes are 20 to 34-year-olds, as well as drivers aged 65 and older.
Using a mobile device behind the wheel is, of course, illegal across most of Canada. Aside from Nunavut, where there are no distracted driving laws on the books, every other province and territory has legislation that includes loss of demerit points and a fine for distracted drivers who are apprehended.
That’s where you come in. For this year’s campaign, the goal is to raise awareness about exactly how widespread this issue is. Whether you have a story to share, a comment about the issue or an experience related to distracted driving, CSC wants to hear from you. When it’s safe to do so and you’re not behind the wheel yourself, send us a message on Twitter @CanadaSafetyCSC with the hashtag #CanYouSeeThem.

CCHS graduating students pay tribute and give thanks

CCHS graduating students pay tribute and give thanks
CCHS students Karli Phillips, front, and Matt Harland, back, coordinators of ceremonies for the class of 2017 Spring Exercises graduating ceremonies threw tennis and miniature footballs into the crowd as they marched down the aisle.

By Lori Larsen

On May 12, the Camrose Regional Exhibition was filled with glitter, gowns and grads as École Camrose Composite High School graduates crossed the stage in front of special guests, school faculty and staff, family and friends.
CCHS principal Todd Sieben welcomed all guests and began by acknowledging that the event was taking place on Treaty 6 Territory and the traditional meeting ground for many indigenous people.
Sieben left the students with 10 steps of being happy that included.
“Complain less, appreciate more. Watch less and do more. Judge less and accept those around you more. Fear less and try more. Talk less and listen more. Frown less try to smile more. Consume less and create more. Take less give more. Hate less and try to love more. Worry less and learn to dance with life more.”
Emceed by students Karli Phillips and Matt Harland, the afternoon was a tribute to the future that is looking good with speeches from students to friends, teachers and parents with reciprocating responses.
After invocation by Clayton Milgate, greetings  were given from Battle River School Division trustee Lorrie Sitler.
“Tonight marks the first day of a new journey for all of you. The education that you have received at École Camrose Composite High School and throughout all your 12 years of education will give you a good base start on your journey. You can take those lessons with you to help achieve success in the future. BRSD believes one of the best gifts a student can be given is a well rounded education.”
The first tribute was made to friends by students Katelynn Hodder and Kaylyn Walger.
Hodder noted. “Friends are people who push you, challenge you, make you laugh, make you happy.”
The second tribute was given to CCHS staff by students Arpita (Nikki) Bansal, Maiya Bentley and Shannon Lohner.
Bansal spoke of the sacrifices teachers made to the betterment of the students. “They have taken on the task of teaching us not only the curriculum that they’re required to, but the basics of life that come from their experiences and beliefs.”
In response teachers Todd Markowsky and Don Wright, with a degree of humour, advised the graduates to use the experiences and lessons given throughout their school years.
With a tribute to parents students Sarah Bernard and Kaylyn Walger spoke about the gratitude felt for all parents who constantly dedicated love, time and patience to getting their children to this point.
Kaylyn summed it up with, “Being a parent is no walk in the park and we would like to commend you for doing what you believe to be true and right in raising us.”
Parents Karen Walger and Scott Bernard responded on behalf of parents. Scott condensed the years of parenting to some laughter from the crowd. “It has been a long journey and you have finally made it. One of life’s greatest joys is being a parent. We watched you grow from an infant and all through those years you saw us heros in your eyes now as teenagers we know nothing and you know everything.”
Karen said, “During your journey always remember there are people you can turn to for support, guidance and encouragement. We as parents only want the best for our children...why would we want anything less?”
Scott concluded with a heartwarming message. “Follow your dreams, live, laugh and love.”

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Community wide garage sale weekend

By Murray Green

Time to clean out your basement and garage again! It’s time for the third annual Camrose Community Wide Garage Sale.
Last year, bargain hunters had the opportunity to visit multiple garage sales in one weekend in the city-wide event. This year, the multiple garage sale extravaganza will be held on May 25 to 27.
People are excited about the possibility of higher traffic with the majority of garage sales falling on the same weekend in Camrose.
The Camrose Booster offered a free 20-word classified ad and a place on the handy carry map, two free lawn signs and sale coverage in the week prior to the event to make the event a huge success. Garage sale listings appear on the Camrose Now! app and the facebook page.
Should you have items left over from the sale, the Emergency Clothing and Furniture Depot is accepting clean, new and gently used items. They are open Monday to Saturday from 8:30 a.m. to 4 p.m. to receive donations. You can also post them on the Booster’s Camrose Now! app under the Buy & Sell button!

Axemen drop opener in close contest

By Murray Green

The Camrose Axemen  men’s baseball team would like to replay the first game of the season.
The Sturgeon Paladins edged the Axemen 5-4 with the winning run, scoring in the sixth inning in the North Central Alberta Baseball League season home opener on May 17. However, the three errors may have left a more lasting sting than the loss.
Camrose jumped on the horses early with three runs in the bottom of the first inning. Just when the Axemen took control of the game, Sturgeon fought back with three runs in the second.
The Paladins grabbed the lead in the fifth, but it was the Axemen’s turn to score the equalizer in the bottom of the inning. The difference was a run in the sixth for the Paladins.
Ryan Petryshyn led the Camrose offence with two hits on the night. Corey Epp, Riley Guntrip, Joe Pasychynk, Shaun Painter and  Cal Zimmer all collected one hit each.
Shawn Noble took the mound for the Axemen and had mixed success. He tossed five and two-thirds innings allowing four runs (one was unearned) on 11 hits, while striking out eight batters. Epp came in on relief for one and a third innings allowing one hit and two walks.
The Axemen host the St. Albert Cardinals on June 14 at 7:15 p.m. at the Harry Andressen Field in Kin Park in the next home game.
Other home games for the Axemen are on June 21 against the Edmonton Blackhawks, a doubleheader with the Westlock Red Lions on June 25 with 1:30 and 3:30 p.m. start times, July 12 against the Sherwood Park Athletics, July 19 the Edmonton Primeaus visit Camrose and the regular season ends with the Edmonton Athletics taking on the Axemen on Aug.  2.
The playoff semifinals will be played in Westlock on Aug. 18 and 19. The final series will be in Edmonton on Aug. 26 and 27 on the former Telus Field, now called the Edmonton Professional Field.

Killam
RCMP investigate armed robbery

By Murray Green

Killam RCMP responded to an armed robbery call at a hotel in Forestburg on May 19 at 12:30 a.m.
A lone male entered the hotel with what was believed to be a firearm and demanded money.
The male suspect then fled the hotel with an undisclosed amount of money. No one was injured. Police made extensive patrols in the area, but the suspect was not located.
The male suspect is described as Caucasian, approximately 6’0” and wearing all black clothing with black boots.
Killam RCMP are continuing to investigate. If you have information about this incident, call the Killam RCMP at 780-385-3509.
If you want to remain anonymous, you can contact Crime Stoppers by phone at 1-800-222-8477 (TIPS), email www.tipsubmit.com, or by text messaging (check your local Crime Stoppers www.crimestoppers.ab.ca for instructions).

Births and Deaths

Births
- To Pam De Hoog and Cornelius Hamm, a son on May 11.
- To Stacey and Donald Reum, of Forestburg, a daughter on May 11.
- To Raelynn and Gregory Olstad of Daysland, a daughter on May 11.
- To Sady and Bryan Bjorge, of Meeting Creek, a son on May 13.

Deaths
- Edwin Peter Kuefler, of Camrose, formerly of Galahad, on May 13, at 85 years of age.
- Callie Rose Campbell, of Camrose, on May 14, at six years of age.
- Joyce Swift, of Tofield, on May 14, at 94 years of age.
- Carol Downing, of Grande Prairie, formerly of Camrose, on May 15, at 68 years of age.
- Hedwig Mary Bernhard, of Tofield, formerly of Muenster, SK, on May 15, at 92 years of age.
- David Stephen Heinz, of Hay Lakes, on May 16, at 68 years of age.