Reflections

<strong>Reflections</strong>

By Bonnie Hutchinson

Leading from the inside

 I’ve been thinking about “leadership” these days – my own and other people’s.
Whether watching the Oilers or the federal Conservative party’s leadership campaign, noticing our family’s dynamics or how we as a species are responding to climate change, leadership is a factor.
And, of course, we all love to criticize whoever is leading whatever level of government. The typical stereotype of “leader” I grew up with was the person with official authority who gave orders, expected and usually got obedience, and was assumed to know the right thing to do.
As I grew into adulthood and as the world changed, I began to see other kinds of leaders. I learned about the value of “influence without authority” as a form of leadership. I learned about “legitimizers” – people who may or may not have formal authority but whose influence is such that others will not cross them.
Leadership is not … One intensive weekend, I was one of about 40 participants with guest lecturers from the Kennedy School of Leadership at Harvard. They turned my ideas about leadership upside down.
“Leadership is not about power; leadership is not about status; leadership is not about money; leadership is not about charisma; though all those things might be useful,” the speaker began.
I could feel my brain start to form question marks. “Leadership is about getting the work done.” Pause here to let that sink in. “And the work is – helping people meet their developmental challenge.”
What? So what’s a developmental challenge?
A developmental challenge is something you need to master – and everything you know so far doesn’t equip you to master the challenge.
Child example. Watching a little one master the skill of walking is a great example of a developmental challenge. Activities that help you crawl don’t help you walk. Nothing about crawling on hands and knees helps you learn to balance on two feet.  That’s a good example of a developmental challenge–when, in order to grow to your next level of development, everything you know so far doesn’t get you there.
Adult examples.  Learning to walk is a physical example. As adults, we may still have physical challenges (golf comes to mind!), but our greater challenges are often social, emotional, mental or spiritual. For example, many of us have had the experience of knowing how to be a good parent–right up until we had children! Then it got more challenging, in ways we could not have predicted.
As near as I can tell, every decade has its unique developmental challenge. To use a personal example, over many decades I learned how to make things happen and move things forward. But now I’m encountering situations where all my finely-honed skills actually get in the way. Everything I think I’m good at is not helpful.
Besides the blow to my ego, mastering the art of letting go, of allowing instead of striving – those might sound easy but they are not. However, they are easy compared to being at peace with acknowledging I am incorrect! That goes against the grain of what I have valued for decades. I have to overcome or work around my own brain pathways.
It’s definitely a developmental challenge. Lucky thing I already learned to walk! And why does that matter?
Circumstances, opportunities and our own thoughts, emotions and actions keep creating challenges we didn’t have before. In order to keep going in our lives, we will be well-served if we can master those developmental challenges. That’s just the tip of the iceberg of leading from the inside out, of mastering our own developmental challenges, and even sharing our missteps with fellow travellers as forms of leadership.
On a larger scale, as a human species, we’ve created challenges bordering on crises. There is no leader who can save us. We need openness to new kinds of thinking and receptiveness to new kinds of leadership if we are to survive on the planet. That’s a human race developmental challenge! I expect to keep pondering this for the foreseeable future…
***
If you have comments about this column or suggestions for future topics, send a note to Bonnie@BonnieHutchinson.com

read more

Thursday Farmers’ Market unveils new loyalty program

By Murray Green

Summer will soon be here and so will a new customer loyalty reward program at the Rose City Farmers’ Market on Thursdays from 1 to 6 p.m. at Duggan Mall.
The program will be launched on May 4. “We are so excited to be doing this for the summer. It is something that has not been done at a market in Camrose,” said Rose City Farmers’ market president Judy Schlosser.
For every $10 you spend at one of the vendors, you will receive $1 in Rose City Farmers’ Market Bucks. Conversely, when you buy more than $10, you can use your Bucks on your purchase. The Bucks will come in handy. For example, when you purchase an item for $12 and you have $10 in Bucks saved up, it only costs you a toonie. As a bonus, you then receive another Buck back for purchasing something that was more than $10.
“We are still supporting the Camrose and District Neighbor Aid Center food bank, so every non-perishable item brought in earns a Buck. That’s on top of our reward program,” added Schlosser.
The Rose City Farmers’ Market Bucks have no expiry date, although the program will wrap up at their 13th anniversary market on Sept. 28.
Lori Blades, the lead in the Rose City Farmers’ Market advertising, also happily looks forward to the new program. “It’s one more way to show the community how much we appreciate their patronage. And really, what’s not to love about a program that pays you for shopping with us,” Lori said.

Spring rodeo brings fast action

By Murray Green

It isn’t officially spring until the annual Camrose Spring Classic Indoor Pro Rodeo arrives at the Camrose Regional Exhibition April 28 to 30. This year marks the 28th edition.
Rodeo action will open with the fan favourite wild pony races for young participants. This event has been a hit for fans of all ages for several years.
Every performance features different competitors in bareback, saddle bronc, tie down roping, steer wrestling, team roping, ladies’ barrel racing and bull riding events.
The Spring Classic will feature three performance times. On Friday and Saturday, the action begins at 7 p.m. and on Sunday, the action begins at 2 p.m.
“You can go to all three performances and not see the same cowboy twice, unless they are in more than one event,” shared CRE manager Chuck Erman. “We are part of a circuit where cowboys will be attending more than one rodeo on the weekend. That allows us to attract the big names in each event.”
Rodeos provide great entertainment with non-stop action. “If you haven’t been to a rodeo, you should come. It’s one of those events that is hard to explain and you need to experience for yourself. If you have and haven’t gone for a few years, come and check it out. It has lots of action, we have a big screen to watch replays,” he added.
Bobby Wills, a former Big Valley Jamboree performer, will be providing the entertainment during the dance on Saturday evening, along with Ty Wilson. You can enjoy the concert and dance after the rodeo. However, you don’t have to attend the rodeo to purchase tickets for the concert. Doors open at 8 p.m.
The Spring Classic draws more than 300 competitors and 4,000 spectators each year.
Local entries Curtis Cassidy of Donalda, Wade Jober of Viking, Cody Cassidy of Donalda, Eileen Willoughby of Camrose, Marci Laye of Bashaw, Rene Leclercq of Holden, Crystal Shaw of Daysland, Shannon Leguerrier of Donalda, Shaylee McMann of Donalda, Brian Willoughby of Camrose, Justin McCarroll of Camrose, Brett McCarroll of Camrose and Clark McCarroll of Daysland are some of the local confirmed entries prior to the event.
Tickets are available at the CRE office, by calling 780-672-3640 or toll free at 1-800-296-8112.

Sharing important messages with youth

<strong>Sharing important messages with youth</strong>
École Sifton School Grade 5 students left to right Ava Naslund, Tynan McLaren and Quinlan Miller listened to a presentation on positive body image by Kelsey Winterhalt (seated) Along with CAFCL Cherilyn Sharkey (not in photo) the presentation has been made to nearly all Grade 5 students in Camrose and area and may soon be offered to adult groups.

By Lori Larsen

For 21-year-old Kelsey Winterhalt accepting who you are, no matter what your challenges or what you look like, is the best advice she can give to anyone.
Kelsey has cerebral  palsy and has simply turned, what some might consider devastating, into a normal and positive way of life for herself, with the support of a loving family, friends and support groups such as Camrose Association For Community Living (CAFCL) and Centra Cam.
Together with CAFCL public relations manager Cherilyn Sharkey, Kelsey is spreading a crucial message that accepting your body image is so important in maintaining self worth and even more important that people stop judging others on what they perceive to be the perfect body image.
“We talk about body image and positive and negative image,” said Kelsey. “What not to listen to and what to listen to.”
Kelsey along with Cherilyn began giving the presentations three years ago after Kelsey’s mother was contacted by Camrose Association for Community Living.
“The first year we talked about wellness then the second year we changed it to body confidence.”
Cherilyn explained that the presentation has been modified to fit in with the Grade 5 curriculum, rather than change the presentation every year.
Currently the presentation is being offered to Grade 5 students across Camrose and area, takes about 40 minutes and includes a question answer segment.
“We show the students that I am just like everyone else,” commented Kelsey. “My parents tried really hard to make me feel like my brothers. When I moved here three years ago from Fort Saskatchewan (for her father’s work) I started in a normal school and was just like everyone else. No one has ever been mean, or rude to me in school, they were always very kind.”
Aside from the invaluable lesson students receive they also have the opportunity to follow along with Kelsey’s blog (kelseysbutterflylifestyle.school.blog/) and learn what a normal day looks like for her and that she is really no different than anyone else.
“On my blog we put my day to day stuff,” said Kelsey. “I do things just like everyone else. I swim, bowl, (she is a special Olympic athlete) and play bocce ball.”
She also enjoys partaking in crafts and playing UNO, Yahtzee and games on the X-box. “I want to show the students what it is like for me and what I have, who I am,” explained Kelsey.
The presentation includes some interaction that promotes positive relationships as well. “We do a pie face activity with the students,” said Cherilyn. “Using a paper plate with a face drawn on it the students are put into partners and are asked to write positive words on the plate about the other person.”
Kelsey has also learned something from doing the presentations. She continually gains confidence and exercises her brain by having to memorize new information and answer some pretty revealing questions from the students.
She laughs when she recalls one question in particular. A student, likely quite innocently, asked what was the best thing about having cerebral palsy.
Kelsey was quick to repeat her answer, “Nothing.”
But despite her short answer Kelsey points out that while she was unable to do some things because of cerebral palsy her family always included her and made her feel like everyone else.
The students complete an evaluation of the presentation with comments on what they have learned. Kelsey concludes her presentation with a simple but powerful thought. “Everyone is different.”
For more information on these presentations please contact Cherilyn Sharkey by email at csharkey@cafcl.org.

read more

Celebrate a Dry Grad Party at CityLights Church, win a car

By Murray Green

Teens in Camrose and surrounding area can celebrate graduating from high school with friends at the CityLights Church (4920-48 Street) on May 13.
“We wanted to plan a celebration with a fun night to remember the special occasion,” said associate Pastor Bryan Darnell. “We are hoping for about 250 people, so it will be fun and a good opportunity to meet other people. We are promoting health and safety.”
The Camrose Dry Grad Party is planned for Saturday, May 13, from 6 to 11 p.m. with jousting wars, hot tubs, laser tag, bumper balls, bungee run, street hockey and basketball.
“This is a night of celebrating our graduating class. There will be endless amounts of food and loads of activities. This is one party you don’t want to miss,” said Pastor Clayton Milgate. “It is an alternative to safe grad.”
Door prizes could be won by graduating Grade 12 students, regardless of which school they attend. Legacy Toyota City in Wetaskiwin has given a brand new Yaris SE to the event that one lucky student will be going home with (must have a valid driver’s license to win).
“This is a community event, not a church event. We want students from any school that doesn’t have a dry grad to join us. It doesn’t matter if they are from Bawlf or Wetaskiwin, we want everyone to feel welcome to join us,” added Milgate.
Teens  from Grade 9 to 12 are welcome to register by emailing citylights church@hotmail.com or by calling 780-672-4261. Students will be asked to have a parent or legal guardian sign a waiver. You can print one from citylightscamrose.com in advance. There is a charge for attending the Dry Grad Party.

Wiltons share art, music of Canada

<strong>Wiltons share art, music of Canada</strong>
Mary and Terry Wilton will be displaying images of Canada at the Chuck MacLean Arts Centre.

By Murray Green

The Wiltons are expressing their passion for art in several ways at the Chuck MacLean Arts Centre on April 29 at 7 p.m.
Mary and Terry Wilton will be showing a multi-media presentation using graphic arts and musical performance.
“Since I’m on the Canada 150 committee, I was looking for things we could do throughout the year that will follow the theme,” said Jane Cherry-Lemire of the Chuck MacLean Arts Centre. “Terry brought me a CD to listen to and some pictures to look at.”
The Images of Canada: Sights and Sounds will feature Mary’s fibre art creations as well as Terry’s photographs and original musical compositions reflecting their deep and abiding love for this country through unique creative expressions.
“We will have a show of fibre art and photography, while listening to a CD of piano music that I have composed,” said Terry. “Mary will be talking about how she creates her art, so we will be there to answer questions people may have. I understand wine may be available (for sale) during the evening. There will be plenty of time to discuss the art and the music in a relaxed atmosphere.”
Terry has made art cards with images from around Mirror Lake that are available.
Mary used one of those photos as inspiration for one of her fibre art pieces. “I used snow dying. You take the fabric and put it into a soda ash mixture with water. You soak it for 15 to 20 minutes, put it at the bottom of a wash basin that has a rack on top and you put snow on top of it,” she explained. “You sprinkle the dyes on top and as the snow melts the dyes percolate down. I folded it and it turned out to look like a forest of trees.”
In most cases, Mary doesn’t know what she is going to end up with. “I call it the happy accident. Afterwards, I look at it and  decide what it is going to be. I use coloured pencils to finish the work.”
She is completing 15 pieces for the show. They will be ready for hanging and available for sale.
Terry will exhibit eight photographs from across Canada. Mary will have all 10 provinces represented in her work. She has been to nine, but didn’t want to leave Newfoundland/Labrador out. Mary wanted to have work from across Canada. “We are blessed with a beautiful country.”
Terry likes to share his experiences and emotions with others. “I compose music around the feeling I receive when I look at things near Mirror Lake. I watched a figure skater and recalled that feeling when I was composing and tried to recreate it on the piano,” said Terry.
He will be performing some of the music live during the evening.
Only 80 tickets will be available for the event. You can purchase tickets at the Arts Centre.
Mary will be holding a fabric art workshop on Saturday, May 13 from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. in the Chuck MacLean Arts Centre.
You will be able to display your wishes, hopes and dreams in the wind by creating a number of prayer flags using fibre art techniques including stamping, embroidery, painting and stenciling.
To register visit www.camroseartssociety.ca or call 780-672-9949 for more information.

read more

Blaque is back at the Bailey

By Murray Green

In what has become a yearly tradition and a year-long wait for most fans, the band Godfrey Blaque is returning to the Bailey Theatre on April 29 for an 8 p.m. show.
Godfrey Blaque has a history of playing classic rock from the ‘60s and ‘70s that gets people on the dance floor.
“We are a dance band, not a show band,” said lead singer Jan Nowakowski, whose passion for music has never wavered. His first band was Jan and the Ortegas, popular in the area during the late ‘60s.
Godfrey Blaque includes Dennis Gustavson on lead guitar, Jim and Dave Lamb on drums and bass guitar and Jim Hough on the keyboard. The five-piece band fills the theatre with rich vocals and smooth sounds.
Opening for Godfrey Blaque this year will be The Criminals. They have been around for years and play classic rock from the ‘70s, ‘80s and ‘90s. The original members are James Remesoff on bass and Robin Eklund on drums. Add Mike Hertel and Simon Andrews on guitars and Al Chomlack on keyboards to round out the current group. The doors open at 7 p.m. and the dance starts at 8 p.m. and goes until midnight.
Tickets are available online at www.bailey theatre.com/tickets, at the Bailey Box Office, 5041-50 Street from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. and 3 to 5 p.m. or by phoning 780-672-5510.

Seventh annual Prayer Breakfast held at CityLights

<strong>Seventh annual Prayer Breakfast held at CityLights</strong>
Camrose and District Ministerial Association members Ed Lehman, back left, and Brian Kushel joined Camrose County Reeve Don Gregorwich, front left, guest speaker Jo-Anne Tweed and City of Camrose Mayor Norm Mayer in inviting people to the annual City and County Prayer Breakfast on May 10 from 7:30 to
9 a.m. at CityLights Church. Program director Tweed will be speaking about the Camrose and District Neighbor Aid Center.

By Murray Green

The community will be coming together to join the seventh annual Prayer Breakfast held at CityLights Church on May 10.
Attendees will pray for the leaders of their city, county, province and country, enjoy music, greetings from elected officials, as well as a free breakfast (prepared by A-1 Catering) compliments of the Camrose and District Ministerial Association.
Breakfast patrons will also have the opportunity to hear Camrose and District Neighbor Aid Center program director Jo-Anne Tweed speak about the community services they provide.
The non-profit organization, which is celebrating its 20th anniversary this year, is made up of 20 churches that together support programs including the Food Bank, Breakfast Clubs in six local schools and Martha’s Table soup kitchen meals.
“The Camrose Ministerial is very pleased to partner with Neighbor Aid Camrose for this year’s Prayer Breakfast,” said Prayer Breakfast committee member Brian Krushel. “Through the faithful efforts of staff, volunteers and many community supporters, Neighbor Aid has quietly served our city and area for many years. Neighbour Aid translates our prayers into food for the hungry and a wide variety of other acts of kindness.”
The Ministerial Association has chosen to subsidize the prayer breakfast to make it accessible to more people. This year, the breakfast will be served at no cost to the patrons, giving them the opportunity instead to make a freewill donation to the work of Neighbor Aid.
This annual local event is modelled on the National Prayer Breakfast that has taken place yearly in Ottawa since 1964. The purpose of the breakfast is not to convert or exert influence on politicians, but to provide an opportunity for people of varied political and religious backgrounds to come together to pray for the nation.
No tickets will be sold, but reservations are a must. To reserve a place at the 2017 Camrose City and County Prayer Breakfast, phone 780-672-3461 or email camroseprayer@gmail.com before May 3.

read more

Infant nutrition

By Lori Larsen

The key to a healthy baby is directly correlated to good nutrition. On Thursday, April 27 from 10 a.m. to noon, Alberta Health Services is offering free Infant Nutrition classes at the Camrose Public Health Centre, located at 5510-46 Avenue.
Parents are encouraged to come and learn about feeding their growing baby and ask registered dietitians questions about introducing solids and textures to your infant’s diet. Attendees will also be shown how to make their own baby food using a variety of tools that are readily available in the home.
The two-hour workshop highlights why babies need to start on high-iron foods at six months and why introducing different food textures is important. Parents will learn how to prepare vegetables, fruit, meat and meat alternatives and infant cereal using a number of different tools, including hand mixers, food mills and food processors.
The class will include a taste and texture testing comparing store-bought baby foods to homemade.
Bring your babies and enjoy the opportunity to expand your knowledge on infant nutrition.
For more information and to register call 780-679-2980.
 Alberta Health Services is the provincial health authority responsible for planning and delivering health supports and services for more than four million adults and children living in Alberta. Its mission is to provide a patient-focused, quality health system that is accessible and sustainable for all Albertans.

Feeling good about doing good

<strong>Feeling good about doing good</strong>
Rebecca Bates and Morgan Rigelhof are shining examples of how doing good for a community gives back tenfold.

By Lori Larsen

Camrose is fortunate to have the University of Alberta Augustana Campus amidst our community as a draw for a group of bright, young students who, despite a short time here, contribute in more ways than we realize. Two of those students are third-year Rebecca Bates and second-year Morgan Rigelhof.
Aside from dedication to studies, the responsibilities of everyday life (paying rent) and being valuable members of the Vikings volleyball team, these two young ladies are strong advocates of giving back and devote what little spare time they have to volunteering.
Most recently, Rebecca and Morgan were selected by RBC Financial to participate in the RBC Make 150 Count initiative. This program celebrates Canada’s 150th by giving young people no-stings-attached $150 to do a good deed in their community.
“We were lucky enough that the manager of RBC chose our idea to buy gift cards to give to the Camrose Women’s Shelter,” said Rebecca. “We chose to help the Women’s Shelter because of the constant demand they have for clothes, food and basic necessities from individuals who pass through.”
But for these two, it didn’t end at the RBC $150 donation, and they decided to up the ante by visiting local businesses and challenging them to match the amount of gift cards purchased at their business.
The ladies were successful in getting some businesses to match the donations. “It was wonderful because we went from $150 worth of gift cards to $275 and a gift basket,” said Rebecca.
“Then we took it all to the Women’s Shelter and I am sure they were overwhelmed with the generosity. It was so special to be a part of it because I know the Women’s Shelter does a lot in our community.
“My understanding of the Women’s Shelter is that these women come from homes and situations that are not good and so they are on their own and might not have these things for themselves. With these gift cards, we were able to give them a little bit of independence to be able to go out and buy something on their own.”
Morgan thoughtfully added, “This experience was both heart-warming and a reality check. It is wonderful to see that there are people out there like the Women’s Shelter trying to help people but, on the other hand, there are people who do need our help.”
For students whose time commitments are fairly stretched, Rebecca and Morgan still manage to find time to help out those in our community.
“It really doesn’t take that long, but it goes a long way and feels good and when you feel good, it is way easier to study,” said Morgan with a hint of emotion.
Rebecca added, “With our busy schedules, it might have taken longer than it needed to, but in the end, the result was more than worth it.”
“I think if RBC were able give $150 to each team at Augustana, it would be easily completed,” said Morgan.
Rebecca added, “Or even the teams volunteering for anything.” She recalled volunteering for the Kinette Club of Camrose, the Silent Santa program and filling a box of gifts that she got to hand select then attaching it to a box from the food bank. “It’s such a good feeling shopping for a family and thinking about their reaction at Christmas.”
Morgan chimed in: “So much love goes into each box. You are thinking about these children and them waking up and opening the items, wondering what their reaction will be.”
Other initiatives the Viking teams are involved in include Vikes for Tykes, a program where each team member brings in a toy which, in turn, is donated to the Kinnettes Club and Stollery Children’s Hospital; and the volleyball team holds an annual bake sale with all proceeds going towards the fight against breast cancer.
“And other teams have their own thing happening at their games,” said Rebecca.
Rebecca also spoke about the Community Service Learning courses offered at Augustana and how the courses create awareness among students about the many needs within a community.
“It opened my eyes,” said Rebecca. “I feel very blessed to be able to say I have done all these things.”
Agreeing, Morgan added, “It is really nice to know that a few people can make a huge difference and that it also makes a huge difference in your own life. Being able to spread love by doing small things is encouraging through the rest of your life. You can do the simplest thing to make someone’s day so much better.”
There is no doubt the impact any contribution has on a person or a community, and Rebecca and Morgan are fine examples of that and will carry the gift of giving long into their futures.

read more

Former dean launches book

By Lori Larsen

Camrose and the University of Alberta Augustana Campus can celebrate the achievements of Roger Epp, former dean of Augustana, at the launch of  his new book Only Leave a Trace, on May 2 from 2:45 to 4:30 p.m. at the Faith and Life Lounge of Augustana.
“The book is an unconventional artifact of my time as dean of Augustana,” said Epp. “Poetic meditations about the best, the hardest, the loneliest time of leading a small university campus through significant change.”
The book is a collection of prose pieces alongside images by his life partner Rhonda Harder Epp.
Everyone is welcome to come and enjoy readings,  book signing and some refreshments.

Motorized bicycles began about the same time as Canada

By Murray Green

After centuries of walking everywhere, bicycles were invented for a faster mode of transportation. It wasn’t long after that the novelty of pedaling uphill (that’s both ways for the older generation) became tiresome for most.
Sylvester Howard Roper was credited for building the first motorcycle in 1868. It was powered by a steam engine and was demonstrated at fairs and circuses across North America.
Soon modern motorcycle features, including the twist hand grip throttle control, evolved from the innovations on this first bicycle.
By the late 1880s, motorcycle development became influenced by the internal combustion engine that had arrived on the scene. The bicycles also evolved into early automobiles as well.
Hildebrand and Woflmuller developed the first bike for production around 1894 with the mention of the word motorcycle.
The early 1900s were an exciting time for the fledgling motorcycle community in Canada and Harley-Davidson Motorcycles played a huge role in that excitement and the growth of motorcycling as a sport and a pastime.
In 1901, Royal Enfield revealed its first motorcycle with a 239 cc front-mounted engine and a belt-driven back wheel.
Man’s fascination with speed became a race towards a furious pace as many motorcycle companies sprang up around the world.
In 1907, Vancouver became home to the very first gas station in Canada. It was an Imperial Oil station. This would prove to play a significant role in the growth of motorcycling in Canada.
Canadians weren’t left out of producing motorcycles either. The CCM (Canadian Cycle and Motor Company) produced the Lightweight Motor Cycle from 1908-11.
In 1912, on Toronto’s Mercer Street, Hendee Mfg. Co. production plant began. About 16 years later the brand name Indian appeared and became a major producer in North America.
Soon, motorized cycles and vehicles began to replace horses on the streets. It was during the First World War that motorcycles began to replace horses on the battlefield as well. Dispatch riders carried communications pouches and performed reconnaissance missions.
Triumph motorcycles provided the allies with over 30,000 of its newly created Type-H bikes. The modern motorcycles were the first to be produced without pedals.
In 1912, the Victoria Motorcycle Club became one of the first motorcycle clubs in Canada.
In 1913, Fred Deeley Sr. moved to Vancouver from Bromgsgrove, England. In 1914, he opened a bicycle shop. He began importing BSA (Birmingham Small Arms Co.) motorcycles.
In 1917, he began importing the Harley-Davidson motorcycle. It was around 1922 when the bicycle and motorcycle portions of the Deeley business became separate entities.
In 1919, the first retail motorcycle dealership in Alberta opened up in Edmonton.
By 1920, Harley-Davidson had become the largest manufacturer of motorcycles. The company began in 1903.
Fred Deeley Jr. founded the Lions Gate Motorcycle Club in 1922 and took over operations of the motorcycle division of Fred Deeley Motorcycles in 1925. Today, the Lions Gate Motorcycle Club is known as the Greater Vancouver Motorcycle Club.
Although many manufacturers in the United States had sprung up to build and sell motorcycles, by 1931, only Harley-Davidson and Indian remained.
From 1931 until Indian closed its factory in Springfield, Mass. and Royal Enfield took over the name in 1953, Harley-Davidson and Indian were fierce competitors.
In 1935, 15-year-old Trev Deeley joined his father’s business as an apprentice mechanic. In 1953, he took over the business. Today, Trev Deeley Motorcycles is the fourth oldest Harley-Davidson dealer in the world.
By 1936, Prairie Harley-Davidson had opened in Regina, Saskatchewan managed by Grant Budd.
A modern evaluation began in Canada in 1969 that would change the Canadian motorcycle business. That year Honda Motorcycles officially entered the Canadian market. Four years later, both Yamaha Motors Canada and Suzuki Canada were founded.
Today, motorcycles still have two wheels and an engine, but everything in between has changed.

Health services offers prenatal classes

By Lori Larsen

Alberta Health Services is offering prenatal classes for expectant mothers and their partners.
Delivering Your Baby classes run April 28 from 6:30 to 9:00 p.m., May 28 and June 25 from 9:30 a.m. to noon. The class will include information on normal changes in third trimester, stages of labour and birth, when to go to the hospital, and the role of the support person.
Meeting Your Baby classes run April 29 from 9:30 a.m. to noon, May 28 and June 25 from 1:00 to 3:30 p.m. Topics include decision making in labour and delivery, when things don’t go as planned, what to expect after delivery, and getting to know your newborn.
You and Your New Baby classes run April 29 from 1:00 to 3:30 p.m., May 29 and June 26 from 6:30 to 9:00 p.m. Information will include feeding your baby, learning to breastfeed, and understanding and responding to your baby.
Classes are led by an AHS professional and registration is required.
Participants can register to attend all classes or individual classes. To register and for more information telephone 1-855-554-4774.

Huntington awareness

By Lori Larsen

Huntington Disease (HD) is an inherited brain disorder that causes cells in parts of the brain to die and as the disease progresses eventually the cerebral cortex. People with HD become less able to control their movement, make decisions, recall events and control emotions and eventually, the disease will lead to death usually as a result of other health complications.
To help create awareness about HD, May has officially been named Huntington Disease Awareness Month. Creating awareness for any disease assists in not only expanding society’s understanding, but can lead to further research and findings.
“May is Huntington Disease Awareness Month and, together the Huntington Society of Canada and the local Chapters, will be focusing on raising awareness for Huntington Disease,” said HD Society Camrose Chapter president Rob Campbell.
To generate awareness of HD, the Camrose Chapter will be hosting a barbecue on May 13 from 11 a.m. until 3 p.m. in the Wild Rose Co-op parking lot (4818-51 Street).
“Come out for some food and drinks and help support the fight against Huntington Disease,” encourages Campbell.
The Camrose Chapter of the HD Society of Canada consists of a group of Camrose and area residents and families that are, in one way or another, affected by HD disease and have regular meetings where anyone can attend and help the Camrose Chapter to network, spread the word and discover other resources for patients, caregivers and family members of HD.
The Camrose Chapter 10th Annual Huntington Society Golf Tournament will be taking place on June 17 at the Silver Creek Golf Course at New Norway.
“Last year, our tournament raised $60,000 with a grand total over the first nine years of $380,000,” said Campbell. “As local volunteers, we can tell you from firsthand experience that individuals and families affected by Huntington Disease in our community and across Canada benefit enormously from the proceeds of this wonderful event, which helps to fund the Society’s much-needed programs and services.”
The entry fee for the golf tournament includes 18 holes of golf with a cart, hotdog lunch, steak supper and prizes.
Registration will take place at 8 a.m. with a shotgun start at 9 a.m. A live auction and silent auction will also take place after golf. For more information or to register for the tournament, call Rob at 780-608-8140.
“We are incredibly fortunate in Camrose to have amazing community support when it comes to sponsors, volunteers, golfers and people who donate items to our golf tournament,” remarked Campbell.
“It is the support that we receive from the community that allows our event to succeed. Camrose is a very special place, full of very special people driven to make our community the best place it can be for all people. We are very thankful for every person who has helped our golf tournament become a success over the years.”
 For more information on the Camrose Chapter visit the website at https://hdcam rose.ca/. For more information on the Huntington Disease Society of Canada visit the website at www.huntingtonsociety.ca/.

Healthy happy heart

By Lori Larsen

Maintaining a healthy heart can drastically improve a person’s overall lifestyle.
Alberta Health Services is offering a free Health Wise session on improving heart health with strategies to manage cholesterol and blood pressure.
The three-hour session will be held on May 2 from 9 a.m. to noon at the Days-land Health Centre.
Residents are invited to join the session given by Nutrition and Food Services professionals through an interactive discussion.
Participants will learn about the causes, risk factors and complications of high blood pressure and cholesterol. They will also learn about heart-healthy diets and lifestyle choices, how to measure blood pressure and creating an action plan to improve heart health.
The session would be especially helpful for individuals with high blood pressure and/or high cholesterol, and people who have been diagnosed with risk factors for heart disease such as diabetes or a family history.
Registration for the session is required as date and time are subject to change. For more information and to register, telephone 1-877-314-6997.

Police badge dons a new look

<strong>Police badge dons a new look</strong>
Camrose Police Service is rolling out with a new crest. Soon all police vehicles and uniforms will be sporting the new look.

By Lori Larsen

Camrose Police Service is unveiling a new look in the form of a newly-designed crest.
“The design for our existing crest came from the City of Camrose crest,” said Camrose Police Chief Darrell Kambeitz. “We basically designed what we currently have as our badge from that crest.”
Recognizing an opportunity to create a new crest for the Police Service that symbolized the connectivity the service has to the Crown and the community, Chief Kambeitz spearheaded an initiative to do just that and, along with input from all members, began a long, but gratifying, process.
The end result is a new crest that is indicative of Camrose and the Police Service.
“We have never received sovereign authorization to use the crown,” added Kambeitz. “We have always used the crown on our insignia and badges. So that was actually part of this process – to get the personal approval of the Queen.”
In the design of the new crest, a limited number of colours and symbols were authorized which made the task of coming up with an agreeable finished product a little more challenging.
The process
Beginning in 1988, the Governor General of Canada received authority to do heralding (emblematic form of individual identification). The Heraldic Committee of Canada office grants authority for the creations of coats of arms, badges and ceremonial flags under the authorization of the Queen and on her behalf.
“We received that authorization,” said Kambeitz. Now it was up to designers to come up with the crest.
Throughout the process, CPS also received authority to create a flag. “We can use the flag as our colours for ceremonial purposes.”
The maple leafs and wild roses in the corners of the flag allude to the location of the service in Alberta and Canada.
Finished product
The finished product (see insert above) is something that everyone involved can be proud of as it goes beyond that of a symbol of Camrose police and speaks to the invaluable ties the service has to its community.
“The badge was created using blue and yellow colours taken from the emblem used by the City of Camrose,” explained Kambeitz.
“The wheat symbolizes the rural farming of the area and the cogwheel represents manufacturing industries.
“The two reflective halves of the blue oval represent Mirror Lake and the yellow lines through it represent 48 Avenue, the highway that divides our City (geographically) and connects us to the surrounding communities
“The green interlaced quadrilaterals represent the abundance of green spaces and our connection to our community.”
It is apparent by the pride in his voice and the smile on his face that Kambeitz is more than happy with the final result.
“We are extremely pleased that we were able to get it done. It took us about 28 months to complete because of the number of steps that have to be done, including getting permission to use the crown.”
The Canadian Heraldic Society also supplied CPS with a framed original hand-drawn and hand-printed copy which will  proudly hang at Camrose Police Service.
“This will be part of our history,” said Kambeitz
The transition will include changes to badges, hat badges, shoulder flashes and Police Service vehicle crests, which Kambeitz indicated will transpire by the end of April.
As Chief Kambeitz retires from his position, he will do so knowing Camrose Police Service will be moving forward with some new branding.

read more

Red Dirt Skinners to make trip out west

By Murray Green

The Red Dirt Skinners, England’s multi-award winning duo, are currently on their fifth Canadian tour, but they are especially excited to head west, with a stop at the Bailey Theatre during the Rose City Roots Music Society series on Friday, April 28 at 8 p.m.
It was love at first sight for Sarah and Rob Skinner when they hit the ground in Canada a few years ago.
“We love it here so much that we are thinking of moving here one day. We even filled out immigration papers,” said Sarah. “Toronto has been good to us, but I’m really excited to go to Alberta. We can’t wait to go out west. Since it is Canada’s 150th, we plan on taking in some of the parks. We have 20 concerts planned on our tour. We have seen the fan base grow rapidly in Toronto and we want to see that in Alberta.”
Audiences also fell in love with the Red Dirt Skinners and, since then, the husband and wife duo return as often as possible, selling out shows in both the UK and Canada.
“We cross many genres.  You can’t just pigeon hole us. One minute it is blues, the next, country and then, a Pink Floyd epic style. In Canada, most people will say we play more what you call folk music,” explained Sarah. “When people ask us, we just say acoustic.”
The Red Dirt Skinners, a genre mixed duo, continue to make waves. They are the first act in history to achieve accolades at the British Blues Awards and the British Country Music Awards as well as the distinction of finalists in the folk category for the UK Songwriting Awards. Their album Behind The Wheel was nominated Album of the Year at the International Acoustic Music Awards and voted Folk/Roots Album of the Year in several polls.
Having no tie to any particular genre means that the Red Dirt Skinners’ sound is instantly recognizable. With male and female harmonies blending together as one voice and Sarah’s trademark soprano saxophone solos, you will be swept along by the refreshingly different approach to an evening of music.
“We are going to play music from all four albums, as well as a couple of unexpected covers for the audience that we have been working on,” added Sarah. “We released an album at this time last year. I’m writing new material for the next one, but we are not ready to record just yet.”
With four critically acclaimed albums, the Red Dirt Skinners have a natural rapport with their audiences and their live shows are a wonderful experience. Be prepared for laugh-out-loud lyrics followed by songs sure to pull at your heartstrings. Sarah and Rob will steal your hearts.
“Our favourite shows are community ones where everyone in town comes out and it feels like community. Playing at the Bailey is perfect for us. I don’t like the large faceless ones.”
Tickets are available online at www.baileytheatre.com/tickets, at the Bailey Box Office 5041-50 Street from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. and 3 to 5 p.m. or by phoning 780-672-5510.

Fish and Wildlife mix business with pleasure

By Lori Larsen

Camrose welcomed a group of Alberta Fish and Wildlife Officers and their family and friends on April 1 and 2 during the Alberta Game Warden Association (AGWA) Annual General Meeting held at the Best Western Plus Camrose Resort and Casino.
“We combine the AGM with a social event,” said exiting AGWA president Kenton Yaceyko. “So, while we are here, we have a hockey tournament, fun games and activities for the children, some fund- raising events and a banquet.”
Fundraising dollars go towards the memorial fund along with other initiatives of the association including the AGWA scholarships.
In an effort to shake off some of the stiffness from sitting during the AGM, to create a little friendly competition among the districts and to further enhance the camaraderie between the officers, a hockey tournament was held at the Max McLean Arena. The big winner was Central Alberta of which Camrose is a part.
The AGWA was formed in 1973 and is a registered not-for-profit organization made up of field Fish and Wildlife officers (regular members), officers who have transitioned into management (associate members), retired officers,  and some honourary veteran members.
Some of the objectives of the AGWA include maintaining a professional association for Fish and Wildlife Officers whereby they can promote professional development and high standards in the execution of their duties, develop a sense of esprit de corps among officers, all the while encouraging and supporting personal and professional liaisons with other law enforcement officers and agencies involved in the management of natural resources and, finally, enhancing the image of Fish and Wildlife officers while educating the public on issues facing the management of natural resources and the health of the environment.
Having an association, such as the AGWA is vital in ensuring the continual growth and wellbeing of a group of officers dedicated to managing and maintaining Alberta’s natural resources so future generations can enjoy them for years to come.
For more information on the AGWA or if you are interested in a career in Fish and Wildlife Enforcement, visit  the website at www.game warden.ab.ca/index.html.

Wills, Wilson entertain at spring rodeo dance

By Murray Green

The 2017 ACMA Male Artist of the Year and Fans Choice Winner Bobby Wills will be performing at the Camrose Rodeo Dance on April 29 beginning at 9 p.m.
You may have heard him at the Big Valley Jamboree and some of his songs such as “Won’t You Be Mine” and “Down By the River ” have ended up on Canada’s Top 10 Canadian Music Chart.
An acclaimed musician with a reputation for writing from the heart, Wills is best known for his signature cowboy hat and a diverse musical personality, combining a classic country sound with a toe-tapping, dynamic twist.
His fourth album, a six-track EP Tougher Than Love (release date: March 18, 2016) is the fourth album in Wills’ vast discography. Exploring his diverse musicality, the EP blends a classic country sound with a modern edge, complemented by his signature emotive, relatable lyrics.
“With this album, I feel I have evolved as an artist to a place of, well, comfort. The making of this album was fun, with a capital F. The album organically evolved, and the creative process was intoxicating. We experimented with various sounds and incorporated varied instrumentation; it was an incredible experience to create and record this album,” said Wills.
His single, “Down By The River” was a summer anthem last year – fun, effortlessly upbeat and featured exhilarating guitar riffs. It quickly became a favourite among fans.
The debut single “Won’t You Be Mine” also quickly rocked the charts. The cheerful tempo of the song was mixed with lyrics that speak to love, care and dedication.
Featuring arguably the most diverse collection of songs he has recorded to date, Tougher Than Love encapsulates a happiness-fuelled musical experience. The track listing engages the listener through the juxtaposition of the traditional country sound found in “You Lost Me There” featuring lap steel guitar, Wills’ deep vocals and smooth violin, to the fast tempo, good-vibes of “Down By The River,” featuring an intense electric guitar solo and Wills’ raw vocals.
Some people are born with a special talent, perhaps even a musical soul. Adopted as a baby to a family in Calgary, no one knew what an impact his biological DNA would have on his life path. “My dad was a huge country music fan,” he says of the man who raised him, “So that’s where I get my love of it from, but no one ever played music in my family when I was growing up.”
Following a spontaneous dare while traveling in Australia and an unexpected phone call, the course of Wills’ life would literally change forever.  “We were at an open mic night and my buddy bet me $20 that I wouldn’t get up and sing with the band, so I did,” Wills said of the Australian trip. “I sang ‘The Dance’ by Garth Brooks and there was a reaction from the crowd that I didn’t anticipate. It was amazing. I’d always poked around music, but I’d never put any real effort into it, so I started to learn to play guitar while I was over there.”
Returning from his world travels, he received a call from the adoption registry learning his biological mother had registered to request contact (as had he), quickly resulting in their first meeting. Wills could not have anticipated the artistic genealogy he was about to discover, including five siblings and a musical streak a mile wide that ran throughout his biological family. “The first night I visited my biological father, we sat up all night listening to records. We both shared an affinity for a great lyric, and it was then that I realized this is real. This is in my blood. This isn’t just a crazy dream I had; this is part of who I am. It really crystallized for me then. This journey solidified my love of music and aspiring passion to pursue this love on a professional level.”
Opening for him will be Bashaw’s Ty Christian Wilson who recorded his debut album Takes All Kinds in 2011.
He is a small-town farm kid who put pen to paper every day after chores, writing about rural lifestyle and values.
After two solid years of performing together with his group Ty Christian Wilson and The Hellfires, the boys realized early on that their raw sound was not one for the mainstream radio waves and instead focused their attentions on building a grass roots following through live performances.

Births and Deaths

BIRTHS
- To Ariel James and Derek Zunti, of Camrose, a son on April 7.
- To Michelle and Braden Johannesson, of Lougheed, a daughter on April 17.

DEATHS
- Wendy Nina Brett, of Camrose, formerly of Edmonton, on April 15, at 69 years of age.
- Susan Joy Scheck, of Camrose, on April 15, at 54 years of age.
- Dianne “Heather” Wilson, of Camrose, on April 16, at 67 years of age.
- Joseph Francis Banack, of Bawlf, on April 16, at 85 years of age.
- Irene Clair Rolleston, of Camrose, on April 16, at 87 years of age.
- Norbert Willard Yurkoski, of Camrose, on April 18, at 87 years of age.
- Harold Ferguson, of Edmonton, formerly of Tofield, on April 19, at 72 years of age.
- Jim McCluskey, of Camrose, on April 19, at 90 years of age.
- Georgina “Gina” Marie Scott, of Provost, on April 20, at 63 years of age.
- Donald Tkaczyk, of Holden, on April 21, at 66 years of age.
- Donald James Sheets, of Camrose, formerly of Rosalind, on April 21, at 81 years of age.