Reflections

Reflections
Reflections By Bonnie Hutchinson

By Bonnie Hutchinson

Bearing witness

I didn’t know what to expect, knowing I was going to speak with a woman who lost her son to suicide two years ago.
I could not imagine that intensity of pain. She was talking about sadness.
“I’ve been to counselling and a mental health worker,” she said. “My mental health is fine. And I’m not depressed. But I am very sad. I have a lot to be sad about.” She said that without a trace of self-pity. It was simply an observation.
***
She’s a public figure in her community, and active on Facebook. She made a conscious decision to post what was happening–what she felt, what she thought, some of the surreal incidents that came in the months after her son’s death. She said, “I decided my son is too important for this to be private. My love for him is too important for this to be private.” She said other things too–things that only a person who has been tempered by intense pain and grief could say.
***
People have said, “I don’t know what to say.” Her advice: You don’t need to say anything except “I’m sorry this happened.” People have said, “I don’t know how I can help.” Her advice: You don’t need to do anything except just be there. “Nobody can fix this,” she says. “It’s not fixable. I know I’m going to be experiencing grief for the rest of my life.”
But people just being there–somehow that makes the unbearable bearable. A while ago she gathered up all the Facebook posts and put them into a book. The book is called, “Bearing Witness.”
***
Another story. A man in his sixties came to a chartered psychologist with an unusual request. He did not need or want any kind of counselling or advice. He wanted to speak out loud to another human being about what he had experienced in residential schools. He said, “I want someone to bear witness.”
They had three appointments at which he spoke of his experiences. The psychologist simply listened.
The psychologist is forever altered by hearing his experiences. The man is forever altered to have had someone “bear witness” to what had previously been unspeakable.
***
This is the stuff of grown-ups. No facile explanation; there is no explanation. No trite words of comfort; there is no comfort. No quick fixes; no fixes at all. This is not something that can be fixed.
Perhaps, just perhaps, what it behooves us grown-ups to do is to be with the pain–our own and other people’s. Simply acknowledge. Simply bear witness.
It’s not a fix and it’s not a solution. But it is a profound and courageous human gift. And maybe, just maybe, if we acknowledge and bear witness, to our own pain and others’ pain, we can perhaps move on.
***
This is something I have learned in more than seven decades: Unacknowledged pain does not go away. If we keep trying to suppress it, deny it or distract ourselves from it, it will begin to show up in other forms. Anger. Fear. Apathy. Physical illness. Depression. Despair. Cynicism. Blaming. But unacknowledged pain does not go away.
I have seen people weep, not with sadness but with relief, when someone says, “I’m sorry this happened. I’m sorry you had to experience this.”
When pain–our own or other people’s–is acknowledged, when someone will bear witness, the situation may not change but somehow the pain is easier to bear.
I have lived long enough to see that on the other side of pain, when pain is acknowledged, what often emerges is compassion. Compassion for ourselves and compassion for others.
Compassion changes everything. Compassion makes impossible things possible. Compassion can heal wounds and end wars. Compassion is good for the soul and good for the body. That is the gift of bearing witness.
***
I’d love to hear from you. If you have comments about this column or suggestions for future topics, send an email to Bonnie@BonnieHutchinson.com. I’ll happily reply within one business day.

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Wynn gave compelling talk on domestic violence

By Lori Larsen

Men, and women alike gathered at the Best Western Plus Camrose Resort and Casino on Nov. 8 for a breakfast meeting and presentation on domestic violence, specifically violence against women.
Hosted by the Camrose Women’s Shelter and Family Violence Action Society, the first Breakfast with the Guys event was held to bring male leaders within the community together to hear information on the issues of violence against women and discuss possible solutions.
Master of Ceremonies Bill Sears welcomed all guests and introduced special guests Camrose County Reeve Don Gregorwich and on behalf of City of Camrose Mayor Norm Mayer, director of community development Victor Goodman, both offered remarks. Bruce Hinkley sent his regards and support.
Camrose Women’s Shelter Society executive director Nora-Lee Rear and Family Violence Action Society program director Sheralyn Dobos, welcomed guests and spoke briefly on the prevailing concerns of domestic violence and violence against women.
Guest speaker Lieutenant Mark Wynn gave a compelling presentation on domestic violence.
“A lot of people don’t understand when people are trapped in the middle of these crimes, why they  stay,” remarked Wynn adding that the question should not be why they stay but what they are prepared to do, besides leave. “Leaving is not an event in a violent relationship, it is a process and that process can not happen without support.”
Wynn spent 40 years as a police officer and now as a international consultant talking about the issue of domestic violence.
 “When I first started in Nashville (Tennessee),as a police officer we were losing 25 to 30 women a year to domestic violence. We (police) had to learn a lot about this crime. We didn’t understand it at first.”
Wynn further explained the history behind the issues of domestic violence, reminding the crowd that it hasn’t been a crime for very long and was, at one point in history, considered legal for a man to beat his wife. “We can’t talk about this without looking at the history and how women have been oppressed for ages in this country.
“We know that these crimes happen behind closed doors. It’s a man often deciding to abuse a woman. But it’s the good men that make a difference and there are good guys here this morning.”
Wynn went on to present some facts and statistics further describing the epidemic of domestic violence. “We know 70 per cent of calls (domestic) police respond to, there are children present. About one million children in Canada are exposed to domestic violence and about five million in the U.S.”
He said that within the last 15 years it is has been determined that domestic crimes are interconnected and often these women are also victims of sexual assault and stalking with  the assumption it is ongoing. “It is a course of conduct, beating these victims down, often to death.”
In describing crime stats Wynn said, “In the  75 per cent of crime perpetrated against persons who know their offender it is against women. Most often women know who their offenders are because they are living with them.”
He added that studies  conducted on what exposure to domestic violence does to children showed that they (children) are four times as likely to be arrested by the police (later in their lives), six to seven times more likely to commit suicide and 85 per cent of runaways come from a home with domestic violence.
Wynn indicated that children also suffer physical violence and death and  referred to the term “righteous slaughter”–when a man kills the children because, if he can’t have them no one will.
“Children can’t get away and when they do they have no shelter,” and by that Wynn meant it is difficult for them to escape  the perpetrator.
“I’m not against shelters. They are wonderful places, but I would like to live in a time, in this world, where we don’t have to have shelters. But that is not a reality we have people running away from possible death. This is your modern day underground railroad, that’s the way I see it.”
Wynn then related stories of children he dealt with during his career as a police officer that had been affected by domestic violence.
“We lose three women a day in the US to domestic violence and every 18 months in the US we lose as many people to  domestic violence as we lost on 911. Right now someone in our country (US) is being killed, due to domestic violence – not to mention police officers killed in the line of duty (responding to domestic violence calls.)”
The filled banquet room was decorously quiet as Wynn concluded with his own personal experiences of domestic violence.
With a strong Tennessee accent, infused with tension breaking humour, Wynn described a child’s  terrifying perspective of domestic violence. “I never lived in a home more than a year – we were always off balance – we were always worried about survival.”
Wynn is an internationally renowned speaker and survivor of family violence who dedicates his life to ending domestic and sexual violence in his capacity of police officer, detective  educator, trainer and consultant.

Plan to power your profits

By Murray Green

If you want to learn how to receive more profits for your canola next year, plan to attend the Powering Your Profits seminar.
Alberta Canola director Dale Uglem is organizing a day of agronomy, marketing and management information session at the Norsemen Inn on Thursday, Nov. 16 from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m.
Four guest speakers will be sharing their knowledge with local canola producers.
Mike Jubinville is a, senior analyst with ProFarmer Canada. His topic will be Seeing the Forest for the Trees. There is plenty of focus on daily grain market oscillation, but the big picture outlook may be telling us a different story. Big Crops globally are being matched by big demand.
Rob Strilchuk is a tax partner with MNP and his session is called Proposed Changes to Federal Tax Laws.
He will provide an update on proposed tax changes and how they may affect your farm. Learn about the proposed rule changes and their impacts on converting wealth into retirement income, restrictions in farm transfers, and potential reductions in your capital gains deduction.
Ian Epp is an agronomy specialist with the Canola Council of Canada and his speech is on Five Things Your Neighbours Need To Do To Improve Their Yields.
From planting time to harvest, top agronomy tips to help your neighbours improve their canola yields and increase their profitability.
Tom Wolf is a sprayer specialist with Agrimetrix Research and Training and his topic is What’s New in Sprayer Technology.
Tom will review the technology developments to expect for 2018, including magnetically charged sprays, what dicamba drift means for western Canada, new nozzles and changes to Pulse Width Modulation.
To register, or to gain more information visit albertacanola.com/pyp.
Dale  will be providing an update from the Alberta Canola Producers board to keep everyone informed of upcoming plans or changes.

Time to write your letter to Santa

By Murray Green

There’s still room for everyone on the Nice List! Santa’s postal elves are ready to help Santa answer letters in more than 30 languages, including Braille!
Make sure to include your full return address. Santa may know where you live, but his postal elves need this information to deliver your letter.
Santa really loves to read about children’s favourite sports, jokes, school activities or family fun (even if mom and dad help with the writing). And, he loves to get pictures and drawings from even his youngest pen pals.
Send your letter soon. Dec. 11 is the last day to mail letters to Santa (it’s a long way to the North Pole and back). Letters mailed after Dec. 11 may not receive a reply before Christmas because the elves get busy too.
Write to Santa Claus, North Pole, Canada, H0H 0H0.
International timelines for most mail destinations are Dec. 5 for cards, Dec. 1 for air parcels, Dec. 8 for express and Dec. 16 for priority. African destinations should be a week sooner to allow for longer delivery times.

48th Avenue bridge project construction update

By Lori Larsen

Recent weather conditions temporarily ceased construction on the
48th Avenue Bridge project.
“It was not due to the current cold conditions, but rather due to the wet conditions we had before
the cold set in,” noted City of Camrose director of engineering Jeremy
Enarson.
“PSA Construction’s trucking sub-contractor had to temporarily halt trucking operations as a result of road bans imposed by Camrose County.  With
the prolonged cold conditions, we anticipate that the roads have already firmed up, and that the County will allow hauling operations to resume shortly.”
Enarson added that PSA intends on continuing to bring rock fill material
in for placement into the lake on the north side of
48th Avenue and will continue hauling/placement operations until they have built out the north side of the roadway to the new shoreline.
“Once they have completed that (likely by mid- to late-November), this will signal the end of Phase 1 of the project, at which point they will shut down all operations until March or April 2018.
For more information on the project residents can visit the project blog on the City’s website at  http://www.camrose.ca/Blog.aspx?CID=8

Kodiaks on verge of turning things around

Kodiaks on verge of turning things around
Camrose Pizza 73 employee Janaki Kumari assists Camrose Kodiaks player Carson Welke in creating a smile pizza in support of the Slices for Smiles fundraiser on Nov. 6. A percentage of proceeds from the sale of each pizza will be directed to help fund critical care, research, training and equipment at Stollery Children’s Hospital and Alberta Children’s Hospital through the Children’s Miracle Network.

By Murray Green

The Camrose Kodiaks were blanked 4-0 by the surging Calgary Mustangs on Nov. 4.
Goalie Griffin Bowerman stopped 29 of 33 shots. Although Camrose didn’t put any goals on the board,  defenceman Zach Vinnell was the Kodiaks player of the game.
“We need to be more consistent. We can play with the best teams in the league. Then we seem to take the night off against a team we should beat. We have to figure out that balance. We have the team to win, we just have to turn it around,” said Zach. “All of the teams expect to bring their best every game and we need to do that as well. We work hard every day towards the goal of being the best in the league. The Mustangs are better this year, but we can’t take them or any other team lightly. We have to focus on being the best team we can and not worry about other teams.”
Camrose shone in the first half of the game against Brooks as they built up a 3-1 lead. However, the Bandits netted four straight tallies to steal the two points on Nov. 3.
“Hard work is going to separate from the rest of the teams. We have to trust the process and that should get us back in the win column,” said Zach. “Our main thing is to work hard and stick with it.”
Matt Gervais scored in the opening period to tie the game at 1-1. In the second, Jacob Kendall and Nic Correale collected markers for the Kodiaks before Brooks got on track.
Goalie Landon Pavlisin made 23 of 27 saves in the Camrose net.
Camrose now has more depth on the blue line. “We  needed some acquisitions to come in and I feel our defence is a lot stronger now than it was at the beginning of the year and that should help us since a defensive system is the key to winning. We are in a tough patch right now, but I feel our defence and the entire team is getting better. Everyone believes we can get out of it and that we can be a winning team in this league. Everyone is going to do their part.”
Zach has been asked to be a leader this year. “I am being more of a leader since our defence didn’t have a lot of returning guys. I take pride in helping lead the back end.”
The Olds Grizzlys will be in Camrose on Nov. 14 at the EnCana Arena. All games begin at 7 p.m.
Camrose will have a three game home stand beginning on Nov. 23 against the Mustang, Nov. 25 against Lloydminster and Nov. 26 against Spruce Grove. The first two games  begin at 7 p.m. and the Sunday game starts at 2 p.m.
Top players
Two former Kodiaks were named the players of the week in the Alberta Junior Hockey League.
PJ Marrocco of the Bonnyville Pontiacs took over the lead in the scoring race with five goals and two assists in two games last week. He now leads the AJHL with 31 points (16 goals and 15 assists).  The defensive player of the week was Calgary Mustangs goaltender Joey May. Since joining the Mustangs, May has posted a 5-1-1 record, including a 2-0 record with a shutout in the week ending Nov. 6.

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Augustana men’s hoop Vikings sweep series

Augustana men’s hoop Vikings sweep series
Emily McIlroy of the Augustana Vikings, left, stays close to other ACAC runners. She is hoping to make her move at the national event in Quebec.

By Murray Green

The Augustana Vikings men’s cross-country running team captured silver medals at the provincials in Red Deer on Oct. 28.
Both the women’s and the men’s teams competed at nationals in Quebec. Collège Lionel-Groulx during the CCAA Cross-Country Running National Championships  Nov. 11.
Hockey
The next game for the Vikings in the EnCana Arena is against the MacEwan Griffins on Nov. 18 at 6 p.m.
Volleyball
 The women’s volleyball team lost a five game set on Nov. 3 and a three game set on Nov. 4.
In the first match, the Vikings were led by Brooke Lindmark with 11 kills, Karen Wagner with 46 assists and Amy Mulder with 20 digs.
It was three straight in the rematch, Vikings were led by Rae Metrunec with six kills, Wagner with nine assists and Danielle Brockman with 14 digs.
The men’s Vikings lost 3-1 in Edmonton and a 3-0 in Camrose.
On Friday night, the Vikings were led by Jesse Weber and Ryys Fingas with 10 kills each, Logan Pasishnik with 24 assists and Thomas Zimmerman with 18 digs.
In the second outing, the Vikings were led by Lyndon Varga with eight kills, Logan Pasishnik with 20 assists and Fingas with seven digs.
Augustana hosts the NAIT Ooks on Nov. 18 at home at 6 and 8 p.m. They also host the Lakeland Rustlers on Nov. 24 with the same start times.
Augustana will be hosting the women’s ACAC championships on Feb. 22 to 24.
Basketball
Augustana women’s basketball team lost a tough 79-76 game in overtime against the King’s eagles, Nov. 3.
Samantha Dargis and Jessica Haenni led the Vikings with 24 and 21 points on the night.
In the 63-55 rematch loss, Beliana Slikker collected 13 points on offence.
The men’s squad won both ends of the weekend series, 91-67 and 98-79. In the first game, Austin Brulotte netted 27 points and Spencer Marion added 25.
In the rematch, Nathan Bowie and Austin Brulotte both ranked up 22 points.
The Vikings host Lakeland Rustlers on Nov. 25 in both women’s and men’s play. The women’s game starts at 6 and the men follow at 8 p.m.

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Screaming for ice cream

Screaming for ice cream
Pictured from left Safeway store manager John Larsen presented a $500 gift card to Boys and Girls Club employee and member Katie Grettum, and Boys and Girls Club program director Trish James received $1,518 worth of gift cards from Safeway employee and Boys and Girls Club volunteer Nolan Marshall.

By Lori Larsen

The Canada Screams for Ice Cream campaign held in June sponsored by Camrose Safeway raised just over $1,000, which was met with another $500 donation by Sobeys/Safeway to total $1,518 which was donated to the Camrose Boys and Girls Club in gift cards.
As part of the same initiative Safeway/Sobeys donated another $500 gift card to Katie Grettum, who was, at the time, the Keystone Teen Leadership Program member and a volunteer of the Camrose Boys and Girls Club, to pay it forward to a charity of her choice. Katie happily donated the gift card back to the Camrose Boys and Girls Club. Katie has been a member and volunteer with the club for five years and was hired this year as the program worker in our Kid Way After School Program.
“Volunteers from the Boys and Girls Club came in and just took over selling the ice cream,” said Safeway store manager John Larsen. “They did an absolutely amazing job.” The gift cards will be used to purchase snacks and meals for the club.
The Camrose Boys and Girls Club aim to provide a safe and supportive place for children and youth enabling them to experience new opportunities, overcome barriers, build positive relationships and develop confidence  and life skills.
For more information on the Camrose Boys and Girls Club visit www.camroseboysandgirlsclub.ca.

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Helping others enjoy the great outdoors

Helping others enjoy the great outdoors
Augustana student Nils Asfeldt feels it’s important to help others enjoy the benefits of being outdoors.

By Lori Larsen

In their pursuit of  knowledge and bettering themselves and their skills, University of Alberta Augustana students need to dedicate a great deal of time to studying and learning. But for many of these students that is only part of what makes their experience at Augustana whole.
Students, like Nils Asfeldt, also feel a deep connection to not only the Augustana community but Camrose and in general the greater globe.
“One of the things I struggle with is that in big institutes, specifically universities, as students  we are encouraged to believe that we are becoming global citizens and that we aren’t necessarily global citizens when we are at university but are being taught the skills to become one,” said Nils of the concept of goodwill and doing for others.
“I do feel I can learn more and can become a better global citizen but I think that everybody is a global citizen of their community, their university, the whole world and I think we just need to get it into people’s heads that they can make a difference now that they don’t need to wait until they graduate or have a job or retire.”
Wise words coming from a young student in his third year at Augustana who also says that nothing really happens without volunteers.
Using his innate organizational skills and his love for the outdoors Nils has been making a difference in the lives of other university students as well as members of the extended community, by volunteering with organizations and initiatives such as the Augustana Outdoors Club, climbing wall, and SCORE.
“SCORE is in its eighth year now,” said Nils. “The idea behind SCORE is we have a bunch of resources in our community and instead of throwing them away and buying new things we can collect them all and redistribute them within the same community. Like the old adage, ‘One person’s garbage is another person’s treasure.’”
Nils began volunteering with SCORE two years prior and has come to appreciate the affect it has on the environment, by keeping unnecessary items out of the landfills, the student body, by offering students a free option for some of their needs, and to himself, by allowing him to give back all the while enjoy the excitement and comradery of being part of the event.
“It is so much fun and people love SCORE and get so excited leading up to it and it benefits the entire community.”
This year SCORE will be weighing all donations as part of being nominated for a AASHE (The Association for Advancement of Sustainability in Higher Education) Sustainability Award.
Nils also has a passion for the great outdoors and feels it is important to share that passion with others. As an avid member of the Augustana Outdoors Club he was one of the main student organizers in getting the Gear Rental Program off the ground this year.
“The program is available to students and community members to rent outdoor equipment, to make it more accessible and affordable,” explained Nils.
Nils proudly added that the program acquired enough gear already to put together a package for a weekend backpacking trip including tents, sleeping bags and mats and stoves.
He did note, however, that proper clothing for outdoor trips is a necessity and that is where initiatives such as SCORE can really help out.
“Clothing is something you can’t really rent and it can be expensive to buy but can make all the difference in whether you enjoy the outdoor experience.  There’s an old Norwegian saying that loosely translated means, there is no such thing as bad weather only bad clothing,” he laughed but on the same breath said how the Outdoors Club and the gear rental has opened doors for many students, and community members who may have otherwise not been able to enjoy such experiences. “We have had international students come on hiking trips and it makes everyone else’s experience better because you are almost seeing the mountains for the first time through their eyes.
“The goal of the Outdoors Club is to introduce people to the outdoors in a fun and safe environment and make it easy for people who are new to it to get out there. It builds connectivity and relationships,” which Nils admitted is especially difficult for first year students.
In his second year at Augustana Nils became a student chaplain.
“With the student chaplaincy a lot of what I did centred around music. I organized the worship bands for the chapel services and I played guitar. That was a lot of fun because everyone enjoys it. People love an opportunity to share their talents and to hear/see that talents of others.”
He continues to be involved in the monthly Friday, chaplaincy coffee houses held in the Faith and Life Chapel and encourages others to come and join in. “It is open to anyone and is a nice way to end the week–relax and get together with a bunch of friends, listen to music, chat, have a coffee and chill out.”

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Derina Harvey Band joins cabaret series

By Murray Green

Edmonton Celtic rockers Derina Harvey Band will be playing at the Jeanne and Peter Lougheed Performing Arts Centre on Friday,
Nov. 17 at 8 p.m.
Every show the high energy Celtic rocker Derina Harvey Band plays at in Camrose is a sold-out performance.
Although the band is now based out of Edmonton, they hail from Newfoundland and Labrador. Guitarist Scott Green, drummer Steve Pinsett and  bassist Ed Smith are all from Newfoundland, while Harvey is from Labrador. The latest edition, fiddle player Matt O’Connor, is from New Brunswick.
“We came out here in 2002 and Steve (Derina’s husband) was already working in the music industry with some friends. I met all of these guys in college and hadn’t seen them in a while. We got together to form a band,” recalled Harvey.
“My mother’s maiden name is Murphy, so I had to follow my heart with Celtic music. She asked me why I growl so much when I sing. My answer was that the story I’m telling requires me to growl and act that way to deliver the story as proper and with as much conviction as I can,” she explained. “My strong voice came from many rehearsals as a child.”
“It wasn’t until I was about 14 that I realized not every family rehearses after supper,” she joked. “My dad has a very loud, strong voice. So to sing with him or over him, I had to push to be heard.”
She also inherited some high energy. “The way I look at it, I’m here to entertain you. Whether that is to make you laugh, cry, dance or even distract you from a difficult time, that is what I want to do,” Harvey added. “We also love what we are doing and it shows.
“There will be space for a dance floor. It will be intimate, but at the same time high energy and I will have a few stories to tell. It will be fun,” Derina said.

The Polar Express movie airs at Lougheed Centre

By Murray Green

Award-winning actor Tom Hanks stars with his role in The Polar Express that will be playing in Camrose.
It will be shown on the Lougheed Centre big screen on Sunday, Nov. 19 beginning at 2 p.m. Tickets are free, but everyone must pick up a ticket prior to the show.
The Polar Express is an inspiring adventure based on the beloved children’s book by Chris Van Allsburg. When a doubting young boy takes an extraordinary train ride to the North Pole, he embarks on a journey of self-discovery that shows him that the wonder of life never fades for those who believe.
On Christmas Eve, a boy witnesses a train known as the Polar Express, that is about to depart for the North Pole. The boy meets a hobo, who claims to be the owner of the train and King of North Pole. He helps the boy by skiing down the rooftops as the Polar Express goes down a steep slope.
The Polar Express is a 3D computer-animated Christmas musical fantasy, featuring human characters animated using live action motion capture animation.
The fantasy movie airs for an hour and 40 minutes and is rated PG. Although the movie cost $165 million to make, it took in more than $309 million at the box office alone. The free showing is part of  the Fountain Tire family Series.

Woods old time fiddle Christmas concert

By Murray Green

Renowned Canadian fiddle champion Scott Woods and his band are coming back to Camrose to present Old Time Christmas on Nov. 20 at the Bailey Theatre.
“People often ask us why don’t you bring your Christmas show back. I’ve been shy to do that because of the weather. Our Christmas show is a lot of fun and is a real a Christmas show from start to finish,” said Scott. “My personal pet peeve is when artists say it is going to be a Christmas show and they play two Christmas songs. Our show is brand new from start to finish.”
This uplifting two-hour Branson-style live show celebrates the Christmas season, with the sweet harmonies of twin fiddles, and lots of traditional Christmas music, traditional country, western swing, country gospel and old time fiddle tunes.
“We have a Don Messer style where we will play “Christmas in Killarney,” but we will switch to a jig number in the middle to feature step dancer 13-year-old Leo Stock. Then we will go back to the song. This allows us to get fiddle music along with Christmas songs.”
He will be playing “Silent Night” by starting out with a solo violin. “Christmas is a happy time, I know it is sad for some, but  Christmas is so sentimental for people and it is a rollercoaster. We go along that rollercoaster ride together. We have a very touching story as well when we end the first half. It was written by a Mennonite girl, who lives about 20 miles from where I am, and it is based on ‘A Night Before Christmas’ and it has a religious connotation called ‘In Search of Christmas Day.’ It reflects on the commercialism of Christmas of lights, presents, Santa and reindeer and it is searching for the true meaning of the season,” explained Scott. “We might not be politically correct because we are not doing a holiday show, we are doing a Christmas show.”
Enjoy sensational step dancing, wholesome family humour and Scott’s famous trick fiddling of somersaults and walking on a barrel, while playing his fiddle.
“It will be a wonderful venue for our music at the Bailey Theatre. We had a tour the last time we were in Camrose. It might be tight to get the bus in the alley, but the atmosphere will be better to set the tone of the Christmas season.”
Joining Scott on stage in Old Time Christmas is his sister, Kendra (Woods) Norris, a multi-instrumentalist and certainly no stranger to old time fiddling. She won the Canadian Duet Fiddle Championship title three times with Scott, as well as several solo wins in various classes including the 2016 Canadian Open (19-55 division).  Also on stage are Canadian country music award winner and guitar player of the year Steve Piticco, bass player, Peter Sisk (of The Good Brothers), step dancer Stock and keeping the band in time is drummer/vocalist Bill Carruthers.
“I will still perform some trick fiddling. I have some new moves this year to show people.”
Scott is a two-time winner of the Canadian Open Fiddle Contest, two-time winner of the Canadian Grand Masters Fiddle Championship as well as fiddle entertainer of the year. He is known affectionately as ‘The Flippin’ Fiddler’ and tours extensively across Canada and the USA every year raising funds for churches, charities and community service organizations.

Blood Services needs your support

By Murray Green

Brian Kroeger of Camrose has made 52 donations to the Canadian Blood Services over a number of years.
A number of local people have made more donations, but Brain is sending out a special request to other O Negative blood types to increase the blood bank.
“Only seven per cent of Canadians have O Negative blood. I encourage anyone that has the same blood type to make a donation,” said Brian.
He received a letter from Ottawa making a special request. In an emergency situation, such as a car accident, O Negative blood can be given to patients in need when there is no time to check their blood type. It can be used with other types.
For this reason, Canadian Blood Services need O Negative donations more than other blood types.
If you have O Negative blood, chances are that other members of your family  may also share the same type and are also encouraged to donate. Those with that blood type can only receive O Negative blood.
Anyone not sure of their blood type can make a donation to find out at the next clinic and receive a donor card. Book your next appointment by going to blood.ca.
A Canadian Blood Services clinic will be held at the Norsemen Inn on Friday, Dec. 8 and Monday, Dec. 18.

KidSport

By Lori Larsen

KidSport Camrose encourages Camrose and area residents to help local youth to participate in organized sports programs by supporting their major annual fundraiser.
For the third year, KidSport Camrose is selling Christmas Raffle tickets with a prize package that includes a $1,250 travel voucher, an electronics package valued at $300, auto detailing valued at $250, two apparel gift baskets (one valued at $400 and the other $300) and two Edmonton Oilers versus Anaheim Ducks tickets for Jan. 4.
The draw will take place on Dec. 9 at the EnCana Arena during the Camrose Kodiaks game with the lucky winner of the draw taking it all.
All children should be given the opportunity to participate in sports which helps them develop leadership skills, self confidence and teaches them the benefits of hard work and dedication. Involvement in sports also helps children maintain a healthy lifestyle.
Donations to KidSport Camrose ensures that youth in Camrose and area who require a little extra help will not have to sit on the sidelines.
“All funds raised in this fundraiser go directly to the sports fees of youth in need,” said KidSport Camrose president Kristy Smith.
Tickets can be purchased by contacting Kristy at  780-781-1197 or by etransfer to Kristy Smith at kristyb_07@hotmail.com (purchaser will be sent a photo of ticket(s)

Vikes for Tykes

By Lori Larsen

University of Alberta Augustana Campus Vikings are showing their muscles for caring by holding the second annual Vikes for Tykes Toy Drive.
The student led initiative began last year and is spearheaded by the Augustana campus athletes, with a goal of giving back to the  community while creating a sense of unity within the Augustana campus and building on the university’s reputation in the Camrose community.
Augustana athletes, coaches, and trainers are asked to donate one toy to the drive. In addition, Camrose and area residents are encouraged to participate by dropping off items (toys) in the collection boxes placed throughout Augustana, Augustana library and at Augustana home basketball, volleyball and hockey games.
Last year the drive ran for the month of November and into the first week of December with a goal of collecting 200 toys. In total, Vikes for Tykes collected over 450 items with an estimated value of approximately $6,000.
The toys collected during the 2016 Vikes for Tykes campaign were donated to the Kinette Club of Camrose Silent Santa program, providing families in need in the Camrose area with toys and to the Stollery Children’s Hospital during a “Hockey Day in Canada” event, run by a group of Augustana athletes where patients were able to select a few toys and take part in numerous games and activities led by the athletes.
“Having previously played hockey in the WHL and professionally after that, I have taken part and thoroughly enjoyed many “teddy bear toss” games and the subsequent children’s hospital visits where we distributed the teddy bears to patients,” said Brett Ponich, co-founder  of Vikes for Tykes and Augustana Vikings men’s hockey player.
“Last year, having retired from hockey, I found myself missing this opportunity of community service. Vikes for Tykes provides this opportunity for the athletes and student body of the U of A Augustana campus.”
This year Vikes for Tykes has set a goal of collecting 750 toys from the students, faculty, fans and community members.
Donations of the items collected will be made to the Kinette Club of Camrose Silent Santa program and the Stollery Children’s hospital.
“To me, this organization is a great example of how giving a little can go a long way,” said Vikes for Tykes co-founder and Augustana Vikings women’s volleyball player Nicole Brockman. “By each athlete/student/faculty member/fan donating just one toy, we can put a smile on hundred’s of children’s faces in the Camrose area and those going through a difficult time at the Stollery Children’s Hospital. It provides the athletes and students with an avenue to give back to the community in a way that benefits the children receiving toys, as well as bridges the gap between Augustana students and the Camrose community”   
The following is a schedule of home games that will have collection boxes. Saturday, Nov. 18. volleyball at 6 and 8 p.m. at Augustana gymnasium and hockey at 6 p.m. at EnCana arena; Friday, Nov. 24 volleyball at 6 and 8 p.m. at  Augustana gymnasium and hockey at 7:30 p.m. at EnCana Arena; Saturday, Nov. 25 Basketball at 6 and 8 p.m. at Augustana gymnasium; Friday, Dec. 1 basketball at 6 and 8 p.m. at Augustana gymnasium and Saturday, Dec. 2 volleyball at 6 and 8 p.m. at  Augustana gymnasium.
Donated toys must be new and in the original packaging.
Come out and cheer on the Viking athletes and help extend the reach of giving by donating to the Vikes for Tykes Toy Drive.

Kwong history shared

By Murray Green

You can learn of the life and times of Normie Kwong by attending the Rotary Club of Camrose speaker series on Monday, Nov. 20 beginning at 6 p.m. at the Camrose Resort Casino.
Sports writer John Short will reflect on the life of the football player, businessman and Alberta’s 16th Lieutenant-Governor, Normie Kwong.
Lim Kwong Yew, known as “Normie” and the “China Clipper”, was a Canadian football player who played for the Calgary Stampeders and Edmonton Eskimos of the Canadian Football League (CFL).
He was also an active businessman and politician, being part owner of the Calgary Flames and serving as the lieutenant governor from January 2005 to May 2010.
The son of Chinese immigrants from Taishan, Guangdong, Kwong was the first Canadian professional gridiron football player of Chinese heritage. In addition, Kwong was also the first person of Chinese heritage to serve as lieutenant-governor of Alberta.
He played for his hometown Calgary Stampeders from 1948 to 1950 and, after a trade, the Edmonton Eskimos from 1951 until his retirement in 1960.
In 11 years, Kwong rushed for 9,022 yards for an average of 5.2 yards per carry and scored 93 touchdowns. He won the Grey Cup four times during his career (1948, 1954, 1955 and 1956). He was a Western Conference all-star running back and the Schenley Most Outstanding Canadian in 1955 and 1956. He was named Canadian Athlete of the Year in 1955.
He was president and general manager of the Calgary Stampeders from 1988 to 1991. Between 1980 and 1994, Kwong was a part owner of the Calgary Flames as one of the original group of six Calgary businessmen who bought and moved the NHL’s Atlanta Flames hockey team to Calgary in 1980. The Calgary Flames won the Stanley Cup in 1989, making him one of few people whose name is on both the Grey Cup and the Stanley Cup.
Register the Friday before each event by calling 780-679-4657 (leave a message), or email RotaryCamrose@gmail.com.
The next event is on  Monday, Nov. 27 at 11:45 a.m. with Pihtokahanapiwiyin, Plains Cree Chief Poundmaker, known as a peacemaker and defender of his people, presented by Dr. Dan Sims at the Camrose Resort Casino.

Snowblower safety tips

By Murray Green

With winter snows arriving, homeowners, contractors, and business owners will again rely on their snow blowers to clear driveways and walks. The Outdoor Power Equipment Institute (OPEI) is offering tips for the safe and correct use of snow blowers.
“Your indispensable winter friend, the snow blower is ready to be powered up and it’s important to keep safety in mind,” said OPEI president and CEO Kris Kiser.
Review your owner’s manual and check your equipment. Check your owner’s manual for safe handling procedures from your manufacturer. If you forgot to drain the fuel last winter before storing your snow blower, drain the tank now. Adjust any cables. Check the auger (the snow blower should always be completely powered off when you are checking the equipment). Know how to operate the controls. You should be able to shut off your equipment quickly.
Prepare your fuel and handle it properly. It’s important to have the right fuel on hand for your snow blower–movement and fuel availability may be limited during a snowstorm. Be sure to use the correct fuel, as recommended by your equipment’s manufacturer (for more information on fueling properly see www.LookBeforeYouPump.com). Fill up the fuel tank outside before you start the engine and while the engine is cold. Never add fuel to a running or hot engine.
Be sure to clean the area you intend to clear with your equipment. Snow can sometimes hide objects that, if run over by a snow blower, may harm the machine or people. Doormats, hoses, balls, toys, boards, wires, and other debris should be removed from the areas you intend to clear.
Dress appropriately, wear safety glasses and footwear that can handle slippery surfaces.
Never put your hands inside the auger or chute. Use a clean-out tool (or stick) to unclog snow, or debris from your snow blower. Your hands should never go inside the auger, or chute. Make sure the snow blower is in the off
position before addressing any clogs.
Turn off your snow blower if you need to clear a clog. If you need to remove debris or unclog snow, always turn off your snow blower. Wait for all moving parts to come to a complete stop before clearing any clogs or debris.
Only use your snow blower in visible conditions. Never operate the snow blower without good visibility or light.
Aim your snow blower with care. Never throw snow toward people or cars. Do not allow anyone to stand in front of your snow blower. Keep children or pets away from your snow blower when it is operating.
Use extreme caution on slopes and hills. Use caution when changing directions on slopes. Do not attempt to clear steep slopes.
Know where your cord is if you have an electric powered snow blower; be aware of where the power cord is at all times. Avoid tripping and do not run over the power cord.

Winter driving tips for a safe journey

By Lori Larsen

No one can predict the weather, but what Albertan’s can predict is that winter in this province brings about a whole gamut of driving challenges.
The following are a few tips for drivers to better prepare them for what can often be treacherous driving conditions.
Always have an emergency kit in your vehicle containing a warm blanket, extra clothing (mitts, toque, warm boots and socks), waterproof matches or a lighter and candle, a flashlight with full batteries, basic first aid kit, booster cables, orange triangle, flares, snow brush, ice scraper and a snow shovel. Should you get caught in a snow storm or, by chance, go into a ditch, these essentials will help to keep you warm and safe.
In the winter is it advised to always travel with a full tank of gas. Should you become stranded or need to pull over until conditions become better, you will be able to keep your vehicle running longer. Caution should be taken in running a vehicle if there is a chance the exhaust pipe is blocked by snow or other debris, crack open a window or dig out around the exhaust pipe if safe to do so.
Winter tires are not only strongly advised but in some provinces legislated. They will provide better traction due to deeper grooves and stay flexible in colder conditions. Ensure your tire pressure is maintained and that your spare tire is in good repair and pressure is also checked.
Before heading out check the weather and road conditions and while travelling, have your radio tuned into the local stations to remain informed of changing traffic patterns, hazardous conditions and possible alternate routes. If the RCMP or local police advise against travel, stay off the roads. The weather network site provides up-to-date information on current weather, and current and forecasted road conditions www.theweathernetwork.com/ca/weather/alberta.
Make sure your vehicle is visible and you have clear visibility. Clear snow and ice off your car before driving including mirrors, all windows, roof, hood, headlights and tail lights. Turn on your headlights in all low light or low visibility conditions. Keep your wiper blades in good repair and ensure they are clear of ice and snow build up.
It is vital to maintain a safe distance from snowplows, sand trucks and other utility vehicles. Snow, ice, gravel and debris kicked up by these vehicles can not only impair your vision but damage your vehicle.
If you need to pull over during a storm, engage your hazard lights, and make sure you are safely pulled over as far to the side and out of the flow of traffic as is safe.
Always adjust your speed to the road conditions. Posted speed limits are only safe when road conditions are good. Slower speeds allow you to maintain better control of your vehicle. This is not only safe but the law.
Maintain a safe distance between your vehicle and the and vehicle in front of yours. On wet or slippery surfaces, the distance between your vehicle and the one in front of you should be at least three times farther than normal conditions. Anti-lock brake systems help control braking and prevent some sliding, but will not decrease stopping distance.
Always be aware of the possibility of black ice conditions, which is a thin coating of transparent ice that blends in with the black asphalt and otherwise looks normal. To avoid sliding on black ice slow down as you approach intersections, bridge decks, ramps and entrances to and from parkades.
Smooth and steady wins the race in winter driving conditions. Never brake or accelerate abruptly. This could cause you to lose control resulting in very dangerous situations. Keep your driving smooth and steady. When descending a hill shift down on your vehicle and maintain a smooth, steady pace. Avoid braking when navigating curves, enter the curve slower and in a steady manner.
Never use cruise control in winter or rainy driving conditions.
Lastly, be a defensive driver, use common sense, be courteous, remain calm and arrive safely.

Learn about your property rights

By Murray Green

Village of Ferintosh and the Little Beaver Hi-U Centre will be hosting a Grassroots Alberta speaker on Nov. 22 at 7 p.m.
Kevin Avram will be informing local people about property rights and the loss of freedom. Avram is a member of the Grassroots Alberta Landowners Association.
Most people believe that any conversation about property rights is supposed to be a discussion about farmland or real estate.
Actually, they’re wrong. Very wrong.
The starting point for any discussion about property rights is to acknowledge that every person owns his or her own life. It doesn’t belong to the government or to the community. People really do own our own lives and the things they create and for which they work.
Grassroots Alberta Landowners Association was established to advance the interests of landowners by working to ensure that legislators, members of the media and the general public come to a better understanding of the impact that industrial development has upon the lives and operations of farmers and ranchers.
Property rights refers to the security people hold to their property and to what they can legally do with what they own. If you buy a farm and want to build an equipment shed, but the government passes a law or regulation saying you can’t do that, your property rights have been stepped on. The land title will still be in your name. The property itself won’t be changed. Yet the property rights that determine what you can and cannot do with your property will be affected.
Similarly, if you own farmland and the government energy regulator approves an energy company’s application to drill a well or build a pipeline on your property, and then–through legislation or regulation–denies you the right to a hearing if you want to contest where they locate a well or build an access road, your property rights have been violated. You own the land. The title is still in your name. Yet your ability to influence the way your property will be used has been taken from you. That means your property rights have been trampled.
Stop by for the conversation and coffee. There is no charge to attend this event.

Model train swap meet for enthusiasts 

By Murray Green

A Camrose Model Train Swap Meet is scheduled for Saturday, Nov. 25.
That means you can trade cars with others to avoid duplicates, or to collect your favourite train.
People are asked to drop by between 9 a.m. and 2 p.m. and talk to local model train experts about the hobby.
It is being held at the Camrose United Church, Community Events Centre, on 50th Street.
Camrose model train builder Ken Morrison is organizing the event. He is a member of the Battle River Railway Modelers.
Come out for swaps and hard to find items.  Locomotives, rolling stock, structures and much more.
For more information, contact Ken at cabooseman@hotmail.com.

Christmas concert in the country

By Lori Larsen

Camrose and area residents are invited to come out to a beautiful country church setting and enjoy a one-of-a-kind Christmas concert at the sixth annual Advent Concert in Fridhem on Sunday, Dec. 3 at 7 p.m.
Featuring the beautiful music of mezzo soprano Nan Hughes, from Banff accompanied by Swedish pianist Susanne Ruberg-Gordon attendees will delight in the sounds of the season as they reverberate off the walls of the old country church.
Attendees are encouraged to bring seasonal treats to share for Duket Bord after the concert.
For tickets visit Camrose Live. For more information telephone 780-608-2921 or 780-672-9315.

And Then There Were None

By Murray Green

The Churchmice Players rendition of Agatha Christie’s murder mystery, And Then There Were None, features great local acting at the Bailey Theatre. Tania Nease did a good job putting the cast together and directing the Churchmice Players in one of the greatest murder mysteries ever.
Ten strangers are summoned to a remote island. The scene of the play is the living room of the house on Soldier Island. The costumes reflected the early 1940s, which was the time period for the murder mystery. The set designers tried to create the scene of a living room from the same time period.
All that the guests have in common is a wicked past they’re unwilling to reveal and a secret that will seal their fate. For each has been marked for murder. As the weather turns and the group is cut off from the mainland, the bloodbath begins and one by one they are brutally murdered in accordance with the lines of a sinister nursery rhyme.
The Churchmice Players will have more than one ending of And Then There Were None, so you get to play detective to solve the mystery.
The 10 main characters are Philip Lombard (Jason Adam), Sir Lawrence Wargrave (Mike Hicks), Emily Brent (Marlene Maertens-Poole), Dr. Armstrong (Ron Nease), Thomas Rogers (Dale Adam), William Blore (Bradley Moshuk), Ethel Rogers (Marla Moshuk), Vera Claythorne (Desiree De Kock), Anthony Marston (David Salmon) and General MacKenzie (Ken Davy). Fred Narracott (Darryl Bleau) is the boat captain that brings the crew to the island.
All of the cast performed well with only a few hesitations. Hicks, de Kock, Jason Adam, Salmon and Bradley Moshuk all turn in stellar performances. People in the audience were seen whispering to the person next to them with thoughts on who the murderer was. The cast kept everyone guessing, especially knowing they have two different endings to choose from.
If you judge the acting on not knowing who was the murderer, the Churchmice Players did a superb job. Although the play is a bit long for most people, I would recommend everyone going to play detective. It will be a fun outing.
The murder mystery will have four more shows (Nov. 16, 17 and 18 at 8 p.m. and a matinee at 2 p.m. on Nov. 18). Check for dinner theatre performances.

This Is That show hits Lougheed stage

By Murray Green

If you love the CBC radio show This Is That, then you will enjoy the live performance in
Camrose.
This Is That will be at the Jeanne and Peter Lougheed Performing Arts Centre on Thursday, Nov. 16 at 8 p.m.
Stars Pat Kelly and Peter Oldring offer audiences an intimate look behind the studio door of CBC’s award-winning satirical radio show, This Is That.
With a healthy mix of character interviews and mockumentary stories, this live send up of public radio doesn’t just report the news…it makes it up.
Nothing is off limits–politics, business, culture, justice, science–if it’s relevant to Canadians, This Is That finds a way to fabricate a story. If you have ever been curious how just two guys provide all the voices for this completely improvised radio comedy, well this is the show for you.
The radio show will be brought to life on the Lougheed stage.

Old Beesley truck back on the road again

By Murray Green

Its rare to find someone willing to restore a truck that is larger than a three-quarter ton. But, Carl Staal wanted to bring his 1946 Chevrolet two-ton truck back to life.
“I’m the second registered owner of the truck. The first was A.W. Beesley from Tillicum Beach. I rode in the truck when I was 10 years old and it was brand new then. So then, I decided I should have that truck. It has memories for me,” recalled Carl.
The Second World War forced auto manufacturers to limit production of regular vehicles. However, 1946 marked a return to pre-war assembly numbers. Chevrolet built over 300,000 trucks in 1946, compared to 36,000 in 1945. Not a lot changed. The trucks featured designs that were based on the 1941 models, the final year of full production before the war.
“We went through the truck and put a different engine in it. Other than that, it is all original.”
Chevrolet advertised it as the nation’s most popular pickup and working truck. It was basically the same truck as the 1942 model, but with several engineering improvements.
Because of the war in December 1941, the government halted all civilian truck production early in 1942. Chevrolet ceased building civilian models on Jan. 30, 1942.
Rationing of commercial vehicles commenced on March 9, 1942. Between then and July 31, 1945 a total of only 56,128 light-duty trucks. Totals for medium trucks was 205,293 and heavy trucks was 64,943 (all figures are for the entire truck industry). Chevrolet resumed production of civilian trucks for the general market on Aug. 20, 1945. The government allowed Chevrolet to build civilian heavy-duty chassis cabs for qualified essential users in both 1944 and 1945 and the half-ton 115-inch wheelbase pickup in 1945 for qualified essential civilian users.
Restoring a two-ton truck is a little different than fixing a half ton.
“We (along with his son Wayne) did most of the work ourselves. It was easier to work on because you don’t have the rear box to worry about. Our goal was to keep it as original as possible.”
Although the truck put in a good day’s work in its time, it is semi-retired now. “We only take it to shows, wax and polish it,” laughed Carl.
“It was a farm truck and it did some commercial hauling at that time in 1946. I have the owner’s manual and he wrote on it that he bought it brand new in October 1946 for $1,785. I have that book under lock and key,” revealed Carl.
“I knew the guy pretty well, so I knew where it was all these years. He actually gave it to another guy in exchange for some work he did for him. I had to buy it from this guy, but he was never a registered owner. He just parked it in his garage and raised mice,” Carl chuckled.
“It still had the original front tires on it when I bought it 10 years ago. We painted the truck and didn’t have to do a lot of other repairs. It didn’t have very many dents in it at all.”
Chevrolet brought to market a full line (100 models on nine wheelbases) of light-, medium- and heavy-duty trucks on May 1, 1946 complete with chrome trim. All prewar models except the coupe pickup returned. The light-duty engine was the same as the prewar engine. These trucks stayed in production until about May 1, 1947 when the advanced design trucks entered production.

Births and Deaths

Births
- To Ruth and Danny Hofer, of Bruce, a son on October 26.

Deaths
- Kenneth Elmer Weins of Bashaw, on October 27, at 75 years of age.
- Lois Jean Kerr of Camrose, formerly of Ferintosh, on October 27, at 77 years of age.
- Judith Mottershead of Sherwood Park, formerly of Tofield, on October 29, at 79 years of age.
- Naomi Merle Erickson, of Camrose, formerly of Denver, Colorado, on October 30, at 61 years of age.
- Melanie Petersen of Tofield, on October 31, at 44 years of age.
- William Ernest Matier of Camrose, formerly of Red Deer, on November 3, at 76 years of age.