Reflections

Reflections
Reflections By Bonnie Hutchinson

By Bonnie Hutchinson

Day the monitor died

Happily woke up at 4:30 a.m. as intended. The evening before, worked on proposal and Booster column but realized too tired. Knew I’d be fresh and clear in the morning. I was.
Planned to send Booster column, finish proposal and head out for breakfast with two favourite people. When I returned, I’d proofread the proposal (due that day) and email it well before noon. Excellent! At 4:45 a.m. monitor died.
***
This cannot be happening. Irrational thoughts.
I know, I’ll just put my partly-written column on a memory stick and…Wait. Can’t put it on a memory stick because I can’t get at it because the monitor is dead.
Okay, let’s try rational thought. Sometimes when you reboot the computer it fixes itself. Rebooted. All the right noises. No monitor. Nothing. Zip. Nada. Completely black.
Sometimes when you disconnect and reconnect cables, that fixes things. Two cables. Disconnect them both. Reconnect them both. No monitor. Nothing. Zip. Nada. Completely black. That’s the end of my repertoire. I’m hooped (or words to that effect).
***
Notice my pulse is elevated. A few deep breaths. Think calm. Think serene. Nah, face it, I’m panicked.
Try to reason with myself. On a scale of disasters, this is not death, serious illness, earthquake, volcano, or tsunami. No small children will die. My mind agrees. My body has an anxiety knot, shallow breathing, rapid pulse and I’m pretty sure my pupils are dilated.
***
At 5:15 a.m. text my computer guy. Know he won’t get the message now, but it will be there whenever he gets up.
This is the only person on the planet I trust with my computer. I trust him so much that he has remote access to my system, which has on several occasions allowed him to fix my computer within minutes of a phone call.
***
At 7:30 a.m. decide it’s late enough to phone one of my breakfast friends to tell her my monitor has died and I need to deal with that so won’t be at breakfast.
She says, “I have a spare monitor.”
“You do?” Who has a spare monitor? “Yes. I used to have two monitors on my desk but I decided I only wanted one so I have a spare. I could bring it over.”
At 8:00 a.m. phone Booster to say I won’t be sending a column just yet because my monitor died. At 8:45 a.m. friend drops off spare monitor. Try to hook up her monitor but cables don’t work on my computer. Still hooped.
Ponder how dependent I am on one machine. Hard drive, keyboard, mouse, printer, speakers all working–but all useless without a monitor. True of other things too. One thing out of whack can make everything else useless.
***
At 9:15 a.m. computer guy phones. Yes he has a monitor in stock. Yes he can bring it over but it’s at the shop. Will be about an hour and a half. Okay. Tight for finishing the proposal on time but still workable.
Maybe I could do something manually, write column or proposal section, then type when monitor back. Sit at table with pen and paper. Discover I can’t write any more without a keyboard. My brain-hand connection has died.
***
About noon, computer guy arrives with new monitor.
Checks cables between dead monitor and hard drive. Seem okay. He’s mystified. It’s a fairly new monitor. He knows because I bought it from him. It’s one of two highest quality brands. He doesn’t understand why it died young.
Then he notices something else. Seems unrelated to the monitor but…more checking…another cable…keyboard...mutter mutter…Discovers a cable that looks fine, but has an invisible flaw. Tries something else…Voila! My monitor comes to life!
***
And so–for the cost of two cables and a service call, I have a functioning monitor. Sun comes out. Anxiety knot dissipates. Life is good. Mark Twain once wrote, “Reports of my demise are greatly exaggerated.” Same could be said of my monitor.
***
If you have comments about this column or suggestions for future topics, send a note to Bonnie@BonnieHutchinson.com. I’ll happily reply within one business day.

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Guiding and inspiring future leaders

By Lori Larsen

Entrusting the future to the hands of our youth is something every generation relies on and without their exuberant will to learn and excited ability to lead, our future may otherwise be bleak.
For over a century, 4-H programs have strived to develop youth and their families to be proactive contributors to the communities they serve, and the 4-H programs in and around Camrose are no exception.
As a young boy, Dave Vikse, of Vikse Family Farms, Donalda, couldn’t wait to become a 4-H member. “I was in 4-H as a young boy and absolutely loved it. I remember watching Gordon Henderson clipping a steer and I was so fascinated.”
Dave grew up on the family farm, which has now seen six generations since its inception in 1902. “I always knew I was going to farm,” Dave said proudly.
With farming in his blood, a natural fit for Dave was to become a 4-H member and eventually a valued judge and strong advocate of the organization.
He has dedicated many hours of his own time actively involved in the Rosalind 4-H club and judging 4-H youth across Canada, including the  Royal Agricultural Winter Fair in Toronto, the 4-H on Parade at the Calgary Stampede Grounds and many places and shows in between. “Every year, we judge at least 15 shows a year.”
As a devoted family man, Dave also appreciates the importance of family. “Parents and grandparents often wave from the stands and it really makes that young member feel proud of his or her skills and accomplishments.”
All the Vikse children have also been involved in 4-H and have participated in exchanges across Canada. “It has been a huge part of our children’s lives and today, three of our four children are school teachers.” No doubt, a testament to the values young people are taught as 4-H members.
“It teaches youth public speaking, team playing skills and learning to work with senior members,” noted Dave. “The senior members hone their skills and now they are helping junior members.” And by senior, Dave is referring to youth who are merely 14-years-old themselves, who in turn are mentoring nine-year-olds.
Dave’s love for being a  4-H judge shines when he enters the show ring. His easy-going manner combined with his experience and wisdom have guided many youth, not only in the presentation of their animals, but in becoming contributing members of their community and society as a whole.
In a letter sent to Dave from a young 4-H member, it is apparent the positive impact he has on their lives. Excerpts from the letter read, “I feel it is appropriate to give a huge thank you to you for last week’s 4-H achievement day. You are the first judge who really had an impact on how I showed and presented my cattle.”
The young person writing the letter also thanked Dave for going the extra mile in showing the proper techniques in the show ring. “From your advice, I have a better understanding of cattle and I am a better showperson in general. Those little tips will take me to larger shows.”
Dave humbly added, “I get lots of little letters and thank you’s and those make it all worth while.”
Aside from the invaluable lessons the 4-H youth learn in the ring about presentation, showmanship, sportsmanship and leadership, the youth grow with the program.
“I love watching these children develop from young, shy kids to those with the confidence to work with the younger members coming up. It is a spin-off for life,” remarked Dave.
But it is not all serious for Dave when he is judging in the ring. His keen sense of humour and warm approach helps to break the ice and calm the young members’ nerves.
“I teach the members to hold their animals’ heads up high when showing. Walk proud, walk with presence, walk like you’re on the top of the world. Then when I am in the ring, I tell them, ‘Get your head up, get your head up.’ and, of course, they pop their heads up and I will say ‘Not your head, the calf’s head.’” He laughs, “Then they realize this is a funny guy and he is actually having fun with us. It is hard to describe how that feels when these kids smile back at you.”
For Dave, it is all about  helping young people grow and offering them skills that will assist them for the rest of their lives.
“If I sell a heifer to one of the members, I have them bring it home to our farm where we AI (artificially inseminate) them to one of our bulls, then give them the opportunity to sell their bulls in a bull sale. This year, we have six different bulls in our sale from 4-H youth.
“We also give them some marketing opportunities as well and teach them how to take that product to the next level.”
Whether it is through his work with 4-H, coaching sports or raising his own children with wife Tracee, the rewards he reaps are the same.
“I get to watch these children grow up and develop skills and realize they can do this. I see the excitement of them making that play or moving that calf and the feeling of accomplishment they get, all the while teaching them the importance of  helping others.”
Who do you know as a community Difference Maker? Let us know. Call The Camrose Booster at 780-672-3142.

Grand Slam of Curling starts in Camrose

By Murray Green

Camrose will be at the centre of the curling world as the Canadian Open, the fourth event of the 2017-18 Grand Slam of Curling season slides in from Jan. 16 to 21.
The Canadian Open features the top 16 men’s and women’s teams from around the world, including 2018 Olympic Games Team Koe (Calgary) and Team Homan (Ottawa) representing Canada.
The 32 participating teams will compete in a triple knockout bracket format, contending for a combined $250,000 purse and a berth in the Champions Cup, the final Grand Slam event of the season.
For Canada’s representatives and nine elite international teams, the Canadian Open marks their final bonspiel before travelling to the PyeongChang 2018 Winter Olympic Games in South Korea.
Returning for another Grand Slam event, Sportsnet television curling commentators will be at the heart of the action in Camrose. Veteran broadcaster Rob Faulds will have the play-by-play call, while 2010 Olympic gold medallist Kevin Martin, 1998 Olympic silver medallist Mike Harris and 1998 Olympic gold medallist Joan McCusker, will provide insight and analysis throughout the bonspiel.
The Grand Slam of Curling is an elite series of men’s and women’s curling events, which are part of the World Curling Tour and feature the best teams from across Canada and around the world. The series expanded from five to seven events for the 2015-16 season. Addition-ally, total prize money for the Grand Slam of Curling events increased to $2 million for the 2016-17 season.
Games can be seen on television on Thursday and Friday at noon, 4 and 8 p.m. host time.
On  Saturday, the women’s quarter-finals are at 10 a.m. and the men’s begin at noon.
Both of the women’s and men’s semifinals will be shown at 6 p.m.
On Sunday, the women’s final begins at 10:30 a.m. and the men’s final is at 2:30 p.m.
Times and games are subject to change.

City requests citizen input on survey

By Lori Larsen

The City of Camrose is reaching out to the citizens requesting input on what citizens deem to be priorities for the City within the next five years.
Residents are encouraged to fill out the 2018 Citizen Input survey by completing it in hard paper copy, available at any City facility for pickup and drop off, or online on the City of Camrose website. www.camrose.ca/CivicAlerts.aspx?AID=3022.
Those participating in the survey can enter to win a $150 gift certificate redeemable at any business located in Camrose.
“Surveys are conducted following municipal elections,” said City of Camrose Corporate Business planner Trina McCarroll.
“We want to get input from citizens on what is important to them so council can consider that input on how the City spends its limited resources.”
Results for this survey will be available at the end of February and will include common themes that arise from the survey responses.
“In our 2014 Citizen Input survey, there were three comments most frequently suggested,” noted McCarroll. “The Aquatic Centre was at the top of the list, along with public transportation and improvement for the roads.”
McCarroll commented on how the City takes the responses on the survey very seriously and, as a result of the 2014 Citizen Input, the City has three major projects underway to address the concerns from the last few years.
The 2014 Citizen Input survey had a record response of 1,200 and McCarroll is looking forward to seeing the number and types of responses on the 2018 survey.
The deadline for responses to the 2018 Citizen Input survey is Feb. 5.
The survey includes the following four questions specifically about the City of Camrose.
What three things make Camrose a great place to live? What three things would make Camrose a better place to live? What three things could make Camrose a better place to work and/or run a business? What City services could be improved?
Included at the end of the City survey is an eight-question Citizen Satisfaction survey on Camrose Police Service conducted as part of the provincial accreditation.
For more information on the 2014 Citizen Input survey responses and a summary on the progress of the projects resulting from the 2014 survey, visit  www.camrose.ca/564/Council-Strategic-Planning.

Make Some Noise for Mental Health

By Murray Green

Student-athletes and mental health advocates in Alberta are teaming up with RBC Olympians and Sheldon Kennedy to reduce stigma related to mental illness and promote mental health and wellness.
Make Some Noise for Mental Health is an award-winning campaign, which promotes mental health awareness on 17 post-secondary campuses in 11 communities. The campaign started  on Jan. 16 and continues until Feb. 3.
The Augustana Vikings, (University of Alberta Augustana) will be encouraging fans  to get louder on Jan. 19 and 20. The hockey club hosts SAIT on Jan. 19 at 7:30 p.m. in the EnCana Arena, volleyball teams host King’s on Jan. 19 at 6 and 8 p.m. and the basketball teams host King’s on Jan. 20 at 6 and 8 p.m. in the gym.
For the third consecutive year, and with endorsement from the Canadian Mental Health Association, the Alberta Colleges Athletic Conference (ACAC) is conducting a conference-wide mental health awareness campaign.
Created and implemented in 2015 by the SAIT Trojans Outreach Program, Make Some Noise for Mental Health has grown into an ACAC conference-wide awareness campaign to break stigmas around mental health. By involving student-athletes, Make Some Noise for Mental Health is intended to encourage empathy, understanding and open mindedness while promoting resources and support available on campuses and in their communities.
“The involvement of RBC as the presenting partner, and continued support of CMHA Alberta and the CMHA Alberta regional offices, has been absolutely pivotal in expanding the profile and scope of this important ACAC initiative,” said Mark Kosak, ACAC chief executive officer.

Workshops promoting healthy lifestyle programs

By Lori Larsen

Alberta Health Services (AHS) encourages residents of Camrose to bring in the New Year with a new outlook by offering free workshops promoting healthy lifestyle programs.
The workshops are led by AHS health professionals who will be sharing their expertise. Attendees will be guided through interactive group sessions that encourage conversation and participation.
Anyone interested is welcome to register for all or some of the workshops.
The first workshop will be held on Wednesday, Jan. 24 from 10 until 11:30 a.m. and will include discussion on stress triggers, the different levels of stress, effects of stress on the body and strategies on removing, reducing and preventing stress.
The second workshop will be held on Wednesday, Jan. 24 from 1:30 until 3 p.m. and will include discussion on getting and maintaining better sleep. Topics will cover tips on getting better sleep, reasons why some people have trouble falling asleep and the important link between quality sleep and good health.
The workshops will be held at the Camrose Community Health Centre located at 5510-46 Avenue.
Attendees are required to register as dates and times are subject to change. For more information or to register, telephone the Alberta Healthy Living Program Central Zone at 1-877-314-6997.
 Alberta Health Services is the provincial health authority responsible for planning and delivering health supports and services for more than four million adults and children living in Alberta. Its mission is to provide a patient-focused, quality health system that is accessible and sustainable for all Albertans.

Balancing youth digital exposure

Balancing youth digital exposure
Andrea Dyck

By Lori Larsen

It’s safe to say technology is not going anywhere and that everyday exposure to the digital world is increasing tremendously. Nobody knows that more than young people.
École Charlie Killam School (CKS) invites residents and their families to join them in the screening of the film Screenagers on Tuesday, Jan. 23 at 6:30 p.m. in the CKS gymnasium.
Screenagers is a documentary film that examines how technology impacts the development of children and the challenges faced by parents who find themselves competing with the digital world such as video games, texting addiction and social media.
“Last year, the administration of  École Charlie Killam School recognized that lots of the struggles or challenges students were having while they were at school were stemming from interactions they were having outside of school on text messages and social media,” explained Battle River School Division (BRSD)Mental Health Capacity Building coordinator Andrea Dyck.
As a result, a group called Dis/ReConnect was formed to assist students in disconnecting from the negative aspects of technology and reconnecting with healthy relationships as well as addressing students’ responsible use of technology.
“They really wanted to make sure that their students have all the tools they need to navigate the digital world.”
Dyck remarked that the need is not only widespread throughout the Battle River School Division, but is also something that is raising flags in school divisions worldwide, where technology is available to young people.
“We are all trying to figure out how do we support students in navigating the digital world, have healthy relationships with technology and form respectful relationships with one another through the use of technology.”
Three different subcommittees were formed with a variety of community partners in an effort to support the community and parents in their knowledge of dealing with young people and their exposure to technology. One of the subcommittees has arranged special screenings of the movie Screenagers.
“This is an excellent film and has been shown all over the place,” noted Dyck. “Millions of people have watched it and it has become a tool to begin the discussion.
“The film takes a look at the struggles children are experiencing. It also  demonstrates the challenges parents are experiencing on determining how much screen time to allow their children (youth).”
The film shares narratives from experts, parents and students about the affects and struggles as a result of the digital world and ever-increasing screen time.
Some studies have shown that children are now spending an average of six-and-a-half hours a day on screens excluding class work and homework and that boys spend, on average, the equivalent of one-and-a-half days per week playing video games.
“Recent studies indicate that screen time increases dopamine production causing behaviour that mimics addiction,” added Dyck.
 “The film also provides some concrete evidence-based solutions for parents to begin the conversations in dealing with this issue.”
École Charlie Killam School will show the film at the school first on Jan. 22, focusing on middle school and high school students.
“We encourage everyone to come to the public screening on Jan. 23,” said Dyck. “Bring your families  and watch it together so you can continue that dialogue at home.”
The film will also be viewed at Bawlf, New Norway and Viking Schools.
“We want children/youth to recognize that technology is a tool and that right now, for some students, it is a hinderance and can be harmful especially if they do not know how much time to spend with technology or how to use it as a tool.”
Battle River School Division continues to ensure all students are safe and that all aspects of their development are considered. “We all need to work together to help them on how to use technology in a productive and positive way.”
For more information on the CKS viewing of Screenagers or if your school or organization would like to consider a screening of the film, contact Andrea Dyck at email adyck@brsd.ab.ca or by telephone at 780-672-6131, extension 6948.

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Band 54-40 enter music Hall of Fame

By Murray Green

It’s official. The band 54-40 is now legendary.
They had a double celebration recently as they were inducted into the Canadian Music Hall of Fame and The Indies during Canadian Music Week.
“The unplugged genesis came from Dave (Genn) talking to Neil (Osborne) one day about the song called ‘Crossing the Canyon.’ The song seemed dark, but was a powerful rock-punk song. He changed keys and then just Dave and Neil played it on stage, the rest of us walked off the stage, and it was a hit. We then recorded it and I tried to convince the band to record an unplugged album,” said original band member Brad Merritt. “It was an opportunity to look at our songs again and give them a new feel and add to them.”
It just so happens they’ll be performing at the Jeanne and Peter Lougheed Performing Arts Centre on Jan. 18 at 8 p.m.
“We went to a recording studio in Whiterock, BC where they have live shows for 150 people at the studio. It was our chance to look at these songs and come up with different arrangements. We worked all week and even up to show time on the songs. It is a fresh approach and nice to play and hear them differently. We enjoy playing intimate theatre shows. It is more challenging because you are far more naked. We want to be challenged and not live on our laurels.”
And if that is not enough to get the party started, the band will be releasing their new album Keep On Walking a week later on Jan. 26.
The band members have carved out a legacy of gold and platinum albums and an outstanding reputation for their live performances that carries through to this day. The band has an unbelievable catalogue of hit songs including “One Gun,” “Ocean Pearl,” “Go Blind,” “Lies to Me,” “Love You All” and “She La.”
“We are all singing and playing for the right reason. We haven’t stopped creating new music. It is not about being famous, it is a pure imperative to create good music,” added Brad.
With more than 37 years, 2,500 performances and 17 album releases, the secret to 54-40’s longevity is their ability to redefine and reinvent themselves, taking the longtime fans.
The band has played at huge outdoor shows like Big Valley Jamboree to small cozy venues. “I love it, the small venues. There is nothing scary playing our normal show. But doing our acoustic show has one soloist with not as much backup. It very much depends on how well we sing, so it requires a lot of extra attention. The other thing I really like is that it becomes more about songs and stories. Our front man Neil likes to take to the audience and explain where some of the songs come from. We get crowd interaction and that makes it fun too. It is a welcome change,” shared Brad. 
The Camrose show will feature many unplugged hit songs. The band’s 2016 release, La Difference: A History Unplugged, is an intimate and unplugged re-imagining of its greatest hits.
“We perform songs on the album, but we will have some surprises as well. It will not only be fun for the audience, but for us as well. We will even reinterpret some of the new songs people haven’t even heard yet.”
The band was established on New Year’s Eve 1980 at Vancouver’s famed Smilin’ Buddha Cabaret.
As Brad notes, despite the many variables within 54-40 albums is a kind of spiritual line-through is traceable.
“We have enjoyed the unplugged tour so much that I can see us going back and making a new album and touring again with the same style of show.”

CCHS students to perform five one act plays

CCHS students to perform five one act plays
Shopkeeper Flora (Bhey Pastolero), from left, interpreter (Donnie Jones) and Norman (Reid Miller) in Arabian Nights.

By Murray Green

Camrose Composite High School students will be directing and performing in a series of one act plays on Jan. 17 at the Jeanne and Peter Lougheed Performing Arts Centre. The show called Lives of the Saints – One Act Plays begin at 8 p.m.
Drama classes from Grades 10 to 12 will be sharing five one act plays written by David Ives and John O’Brien that could make you laugh out loud, while pondering life. The local version is directed by CCHS drama teacher Stephen Cole and Grade 12 students Josh Mah, Josh Nyback and James Rostad.
Arabian Nights
This play is directed by James Rostad. “The interpreter communicates with a shopkeeper and a traveler and he is mixing up the words and making fun of it all. You can have an opportunity to be creative and have a lot of fun with this play. It is light-hearted and is a comedy, so that is the reason I picked this play,” said Rostad.
The directing experience will help Rostad in the future. “If I have a future role to play I will come at it differently. As a director you have to be aware of the props, costumes and the set. I will have much more appreciation for all of that when I’m acting and more respect for the director.”
Limbo
This play is directed by Josh Nyback. A father with Alzheimer’s tries to carry on a conversation with his three daughters, but they only guess as to what he is talking about. “The whole idea is that the father is in limbo and in between life and death. The daughters are trying to make him remember,” said Nyback.
“I liked the dry humour of the play. It is really cool to be on the other end as a director. It is actually pretty stressful. It is harder than you think to be a director. At the same time it is fun and I’m glad to be able to experience that.”
The Philadelphia
This play is directed by Josh Mah. A young man in a restaurant has fallen into a Philadelphia (a Twilight Zone-like state in which he cannot get anything he asks for). “One day Marcus wakes up and everything is backwards. He tries to get the Daily newspaper and he receives the Times. He goes to the deli and asks for pastrami and gets tongue instead. He is freaking out and then meets his friend Al at a bar. His friend then explains what is going on,” said Mah.
“Directing is not as much fun. I played Al, who yelled and screamed, and I had fun with the character. It is different because you are leading the group, instead of focusing on your own part.”
Mah has thoughts of becoming a drama teacher to follow in Mr. Coe’s footsteps.
Captive Audience
This play is directed by Mr. Coe. A cautionary fable tells how Rob and Laura face a menace in their living room: a television that talks back to them and threatens to swallow them whole. Finally, an old man is locked in the garden of his memories, locked there because he can only speak in disjointed syllables. His three daughters who are with him in this moment can’t understand what he is getting at, and they are becoming increasingly impatient.
Sure Thing
This play is directed by Mr. Coe. It starts out with two people meeting in a cafe and finding their way through a conversational minefield as an offstage bell interrupts their false starts, gaffes and faux pas on the way to falling in love.

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Prayer Service celebrates unity

By Murray Green

Local congregations representing several Christian denominations will come together for an Ecumenical Celebration of the Word of God on Sunday, Jan. 21.
The service, which will be held as part of the area’s observance of the annual Week of Prayer for Christian Unity, will take place at St. Francis Xavier Church (5010-48A Avenue) in Camrose starting at 7 p.m.
Father Jacques Vaillancourt, Rector of St. Andrew’s Anglican Parish, will deliver the message. Special music will be provided by the choir SETH. Fellowship and refreshments will follow.
Started in 1908, the Week of Prayer for Christian Unity is celebrated each year in cities and towns across the country and around the world.
The theme for the 2018 observance is Your Right Hand, O Lord, Glorious in Power (Exodus 15:6). The theme and text for each year’s observance of the Week of Prayer for Christian Unity are chosen and prepared by representatives of the Pontifical Council for Promoting Christian Unity and representatives of the World Council of Churches.
The Camrose service is sponsored by the Camrose and District Ministerial Association. The public is cordially invited to attend.

Former Kodiaks named to Olympic Games team

By Murray Green

Two former Camrose Kodiaks’ players will be wearing a maple leaf on their jersey at the 2018 Winter Olympic Games in PyeongChang, South Korea, Feb. 14 to 24.
Forward Mason Raymond and defenceman Karl Stollery were named to the 25-man Canadian roster on Jan. 11.
“It’s been exciting to watch the whole process over the last few months. To have two ex-Kodiaks play for your country and make the Olympic team is great. I’m getting excited, just thinking about it,” said Boris Rybalka, coach and general manager of the Kodiaks.
Raymond, who was a member of the team that just won the Spengler Cup in December, is currently playing for SC Bern in Switzerland. He also played in the Karjala Cup and Sochi tournaments in 2017.
He previously played in the National Hockey League with the Anaheim Ducks, Calgary Flames, Vancouver Canucks and Toronto Maple Leafs.
“Sometimes things happen for a reason. By the NHL not being part of the Olympics, it opened the door for Mason and Karl. An opportunity was made and I know I’m a proud father. That’s how we treat these players, as family. I wanted to make sure Mason and Karl knew it isn’t just the Kodiaks, the entire community is proud and excited for them.”
Raymond played in the Alberta Junior Hockey League (AJHL) for two seasons, where he captured league and regional titles with the Camrose Kodiaks, while also being named league MVP in 2005 for scoring 41 goals.
He then joined the college ranks with the Minnesota-Duluth Bulldogs of the Western Collegiate Hockey Association (WCHA) for a two-year tenure there, as well. He earned WCHA all-rookie honours in 2006, WCHA first team all-star honours in 2007, and was also named the Bulldogs’ most valuable player in 2007.
Raymond was drafted by the Canucks in the 2005 NHL Entry Draft in the second round, 51st overall. After spending parts of two seasons with their American Hockey League (AHL) affiliate, the Manitoba Moose, he joined the club full-time in 2007-08. He is known as a fast-skating offensive player.
He played 542 games in the NHL recording 115 goals and 251 points.
“I know they are both ecstatic to put on the maple leaf and play in the Olympics. It is the biggest stage in the world and everyone is going to be watching it,” said Boris.
Stollery is currently playing for Dinamo Riga in the KHL. He also played in the Karjala Cup and Sochi tournaments in 2017.
Stollery played four seasons with the Kodiaks, helping clinch the championship and Doyle Cup on three occasions and was a two-time AJHL South all-star, captaining in his second appearance. He played his minor hockey in Camrose.
Stollery went to Merrimack College of the Hockey East. In his freshman season in 2008-09, he played in all 34 games and led the defence in scoring with 16 points to be the lone defenceman named to the Hockey East all-rookie team.
“I remember the interview with Connor McDavid and how disappointed he was that he couldn’t go to the Olympics. He said, ‘That was a goal of mine’ and now he might not get that chance. But, Mason and Karl will have that opportunity,” added Boris. “It is a huge thing to play for Team Canada.”
He was signed to an amateur try-out contract with the Lake Erie Monsters of the American Hockey League, an affiliate of the Colorado Avalanche. He was traded to the San Jose Sharks. He signed as a free agent with the New Jersey Devils. Stollery left North America to sign a one-year deal with Latvian club, Dinamo Riga of the KHL.
Stollery played 23 games with three teams in the NHL and recorded three assists.
In total, six AJHL alumni were named to Team Canada.
The four other players are Rene Bourque (St. Albert Saints), Mat Robinson and Brandon Kozun (Calgary Royals) and Ben Scrivens (Spruce Grove Saints).
“We know the Western Hockey League is the best junior league in the west, but this says a lot about the AJHL and how good it is.”

Kodiaks collect points

Kodiaks collect points
JUICY REBOUND Colson Gengenbach of the Camrose Kodiaks gets ready to pounce on a rebound against the Calgary Canucks in the EnCana Arena on Jan. 7.

By Murray Green

The Camrose Kodiaks are earning points in the Alberta Junior Hockey League, but not the way they want to.
Camrose lost two straight extra time losses at home. Against the Calgary Canucks, the Kodiaks let the opposition build a 3-0 lead in the first period before rallying for three in the second to tie the game.   Matt Dykstra, Nic Correale and Kyler Kupka supplied the markers.
The Kodiaks went up early in the third on a Zach Vinnell tally. However, the Canucks scored both on a power play and shorthanded to re-gain the lead.
Brock Bremer forced overtime when he connected on a feed from Matt Gervais and Jacob Kendall late in the third. When the extra frame didn’t break the deadlock, the Canucks emerged winners in the shootout. Camrose goalie Luke Lush stopped 27 of 32 shots he faced. The Kodiaks fired 33 shots at the Calgary cage on Jan. 7.
The night before Camrose played well in regulation to force overtime. Kendall opened the scoring in the first period against the Okotoks Oilers in the 3-2 loss. Okotoks netted the lone tally in the second. The Oilers went up in the third, but Camrose replied 12 seconds later to knot the game once more. Okotoks scored in the last 30 seconds of overtime to garner the two points.
Lush turned away 33 of 36 shots directed his way. Camrose had 22 shots.

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Lyseng built his dream car by using mostly steel

Lyseng built his dream car by using mostly steel
MAN OF STEEL Malcolm Lyseng added as much steel as he could when he restored a 1933 Ford two door sedan. He re-built his smooth-looking sedan into a classy vehicle he enjoys cruising down the highway in.

By Murray Green

Malcolm Lyseng always wanted a 1933 or 1934 car to restore. So when a 1933 Ford two-door sedan was spotted, it drew his attention.
“My nephew found a 1933 car in Spruce Grove. The guy started working on it and he was going through a divorce situation, and needed to sell it. Long story short, I came along and bought it.”
The 1933 Ford improvements included an 112-inch wheel base, six inches longer than 1932 Ford models. Other chassis improvements included a X-member double drop frame with wider 17-inch wheels and tires.
“When I got it, I completely rebuilt the entire car. It has been a frame-off restoration. I put in a Chevy motor, Chevy transmission and a Ford rear end. I did all of the work on the car except the upholstery. I did the welding, fixing and even painted the car.”
The 1933 Ford automobiles looked much more flowing, reflecting The Ford Motor Company and Detroit’s shift to more streamlined cars. The new design, along with the Ford V-8, was universally applauded by customers.
“I went with a Chevrolet motor because you can get all kinds of parts for them. It is a small, light engine that is easy to work on and it has good power. The motor fit nice in the car. I have a Chevrolet 350   engine in it and it had a 350 when I received the car, so I just went with it. Back in that time (1933), it would have been a Ford flathead engine. In 1932, they brought out a flathead V8 and that is what would have been in this car.”
The 1933 Ford styling changes included a hood that extended back to the windshield, fenders that were skirted and dipped low in front, sharp corners that were rounded off, rear hinged doors now appeared on all models, a new grille design incorporated vertical bars slanting back like the windshield and acorn-shaped headlight shells.
“When I bought the car, the 350 engine was already in it, but it had a four-bolt main, steel crank and a lot of features on it. I took it all down and its been rebuilt from that. It is bored out and I’m running a special cam in there and a different top end.”
Model C 1933 Fords were equipped with four-cylinder engines rated at 50 horsepower. Model 40 1933 Fords were equipped with V-8 cylinder engines rated at 75 horsepower. Over 515,000 1933 Ford automobiles were produced.
“Basically, I rebuilt it to be a bit more smooth. Now I have a three-piece hood. There are no hinges on the doors, so it is all smooth. There are no holes anywhere, except the radiator.”
Mal found stock fenders and fibreglass running boards for the vehicle. “The hood and side pieces are from California. The only things that are Henry Ford on the car are the body, doors and the grille. The rest are after-market pieces that were made to fit this car.”
The main difference between the coupe and the two-door sedan is the shorter back seat area.
“Originally, the car I wanted to build was a street rod. I wanted the 1933 Ford coupe. So, when my nephew suggested the two-door sedan, I was interested. I wanted Henry Ford’s steel, but when they were built, he didn’t care if there were half-inch gaps or if pieces banged together. They made them and sold them. I wanted something better. Now it is better than the original.”
The only fibreglass is the running boards that he doesn’t use. “Now you can buy them all plastic (fibreglass) and put them together yourself. However, I wanted something that was all steel. I put in a Cadillac rough-in for the same reason – more steel. This is a hobby, but I built the car I wanted in the end. I wanted 1933. This style was only in for 1933 and 1934. It is really a unique style and those are the only two years I wanted when it came to building a vehicle. The 1932 is chunkier.”
Mal tries to attend local cruises. “This car has been on the road since 2005 and we attended quite a few car shows back then. Now, we just like to cruise and enjoy it.”
They have gone to Idaho, Montana and Washington. Now they stick closer to home as far as going to car shows.

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Kodiaks decline trades

By Murray Green

The Camrose Kodiaks coach and general manager Boris Rybalka listened to other teams about making trades, but decided to stay with the players he has in the dressing room for the rest of the season.
“You never say no on the trade deadline, but at the same time we did our homework. We made our good trades earlier in the season. We were not prepared to give away our good players for someone we hope would help us,” explained Boris. “Nobody wants to trade with us because we don’t just give players away.”
More words were spoken about the trades not made. “One general manager said to me, I see you didn’t make any trades. But in a sense I did. We have a good team, but we are adding Ryan Hartman, Ryan McKinnon and Braeden Nesbitt, who are coming back from injuries.”
 Those three players will make the Kodiaks better without adding more players. “Hartman and McKinnon are healthy now and Nesbitt has been skating. He will be back in about a week or two. Where would I find a Hartman, McKinnon and Nesbitt on Jan. 10 (trade deadline)? You won’t and if you do, you are giving up valuable players in the line-up. The last two months we have been playing with three lines. We even moved Nick Mantai to forward to help us out. I give everyone credit for sticking with it to make us better.”
 He pointed out that the Kodiaks have played shorthanded for two and half months, so what is another week. “We are not selling out the farm (young players) to make a move when the standings are so tight. We believe that we have the players to move up in the standings and make the playoffs,” said Boris.
“I told the players in our meeting that we are fifth in the league. When you look at the number of losses we have, we are fifth best in the league. The light bulb went off, that’s how close we are. Take seven out of those overtime losses and turn them into wins and we are in third place. We are that close,” he pointed out.
The third place Drumheller Dragons have more losses than the Kodiaks. “All we need is a little extra. We don’t want injuries, but this year it helped us. We are in a position to improve without making another trade.”
This year was the quietest trade deadline the Kodiaks have ever had. That’s because the Kodiaks made key trades earlier in the season.

Seniors’ gift tree

By Lori Larsen

Appreciating that some seniors in Camrose may not have had family or others to help celebrate the holiday season, Pat Carlson of Harley’s Liquor Store ran a campaign to encourage customers to reach out.
During the month of December, customers could select a card from a Christmas tree displayed in the store. Each card contained a special gift request, such as warm mittens, from an anonymous  recipient at one of six seniors’ facilities in Camrose. The customer then dropped off that particular gift back at the store. Nearing Christmas, the gifts were delivered to the  designated facilities in an effort to bring a little joy and happiness to the seniors.
“Pat Carlson asked us if we would participate and welcome some of the gifts dropped off for our clients at the SOS Program,” remarked Service Options for Seniors (SOS) executive director Donna Coombs.
“We were overwhelmed by the response. We gave out numerous gifts and gift cards to some of our clients, at the office, which gave  them a chance for a better Christmas even if they were spending it alone.”
Thanks to the generous hearts of Camrosians, approximately 275 gifts were donated to seniors in Camrose during the holiday season.

Hockey Vikings drop two to NAIT

By Murray Green

The Augustana Vikings hockey lost two close games to the first place NAIT Ooks on Jan. 5 and 6.
In Camrose, the tie was broken when Brandon Ralph of NAIT scored a  short-handed goal in the last minute as the Ooks defeated the Augustana Vikings 4-3 in Alberta Colleges Athletic Conference play.
The lone tally in the middle frame was scored by the Ooks’ Tyler Robertson, who ended the night with two goals.
In the third, Mitch McMullin and Evan Warmington replied for the Vikings to give them the lead until NAIT came back later in the period.
The Ooks out shot the Vikings 43-32, with Curtis Skip making 41 saves for Augustana.
Travis Mayan, Joe Olson and Zaine Walker scored in the second. In the third, Sheehan and Cody Fiala scored early to take the lead, but NAIT responded with a pair of their own. McMullin sent the game into overtime with a tally of his own.
Francis Menard’s goal in double overtime proved to be winner as the NAIT Ooks defeated the Augustana Vikings 7-6.
The Ooks out shot the Vikings 52-21 with Augustana netminder Harry Fredeman making 45 saves.
The next game for the Vikings in the Max McLean Arena is against the SAIT Trojans on Jan. 19 at 7:30 p.m.

 

Births and Deaths

Births
 - To Anna Loewen and Martin Giesbrecht, of Two Hills, a son on January 3.
- To Breanne Davis and Michael Topolnitsky, of Vegreville a daughter on January 3.
- To Karli and Alex Gillis, of Camrose, a son on January 7.
- To Jennifer and Sheldon Wagner, of Forestburg, a daughter on January 7.

Deaths
- Theodore Kalita of Bruce, on January 4, at 68 years of age.
- Selma Caroline Peter of Camrose, on January 5, at 84 years of age.
- Benny “Ben” Norman Voshell of Camrose, on January 6, at 86 years of age.
- Constance Shirley Burfield of Camrose, formerly of Edmonton, on January 6, at 82 years of age.
- Dennis Posegate of Wetaskiwin, on January 8, at 71 years of age.
- Donna Lois Davis of Evansburg, formerly of Edmonton, on January 8, at 80 years of age.
- Tanisha Skye Peterson of Camrose, on January 9, at 22 years of age.
- Laurna Dorries Lucas of Camrose, on January 11, at 84 years of age.
- Gordon Allan Sampson of Camrose, formerly of Lamont, on January 12, at 95 years of age.