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Reflections

By Bonnie Hutchinson

Play the cards you've been dealt
 
As a young adult, I was exposed to the phrase, “Play the cards you’ve been dealt.”
I was not and am not a skilled cards player. In Hearts, I consistently get the Queen of Spades–a sure way to lose. I stopped playing Bridge because my bidding was so inept that I antagonized all potential partners. I’ve been told, “Don’t even think about playing Poker,” because my face cannot keep a secret. Regardless of skill level, I do get the point. In card games we have no choice but to play the cards we’ve been dealt. In life, if we’re smart, we’ll do that too. In that context, I appreciated a news item about Vulcan and Southern Alberta.
***
“New electric vehicle charging station up and running in Vulcan,” was the headline in the Vulcan Advocate. The photo showed eight Vulcan town councillors and corporate representatives at the ribbon-cutting grand opening on Nov. 15. This is part of a bigger story. The Vulcan site is one of 20 electric vehicle (EV) charging locations across Southern Alberta.
Megan Lohmann, project manager for Peaks to Prairies EV Networks Community Energy Association, said, “Three months ago before any of these were installed it would be very difficult to travel through Southern Alberta with an electric vehicle. Because of the collaboration between funders and host communities, we have now addressed those gaps so now it allows for a lot more reliable travel.”
She said, “It’s getting a lot better across Canada.” For example, Petro Canada and Canadian Tire are starting to host charging stations. “Gaps still remain in rural areas, so the intent of this project is to get off the main highway and fill in that regional gap,” she added. “We can draw drivers into these small communities for economic and tourism benefit.”
That’s seeing an opportunity in the cards we’ve been dealt–the rise of vehicles not solely dependent on petroleum products.
***
Once upon a time, the horse was a major vehicle of land transportation for people and goods. And once upon a time, steam engines and motor vehicles were invented. Horse breeders and buggy manufacturers and a whole lot of other people had their livelihoods wiped out. It wasn’t fair. Plus, we now know that some of the bi-products of motorized vehicles are bad for the planet. That in turn is bad for millions of people. That too is true.
But it doesn’t change the fact the people whose livelihoods were dependent on horses had their livelihoods wiped out, through no fault of their own, by forces they could not control. Definitely not fair.
That’s the cards they were dealt.
There are things we can control (our own actions, words, thoughts and emotions) and things we cannot control (pretty much everything else).
The faster we do whatever we can to understand the things we cannot control–the cards we’ve been dealt–the faster we can start figuring out how we can best deal with those facts of life, using what we can control.
So…it seems obvious that oil is not coming back the way it was. We had a pretty good run for more than half a century. We can be grateful, but we almost certainly cannot bring it back. The world has changed. Outside people have said bad things about us? Yep, fact of life. Let’s acknowledge and move on.
It’s also true that public opinion about climate change and the environment makes alternate sources of energy more attractive to generations and nations of people. That’s the emerging market. That too is the cards we’ve been dealt.
That’s why I was thrilled to read that Vulcan and the communities of Southern Alberta are creating a network of electric vehicle charging stations. That’s seeing emerging opportunities in the cards we’ve been dealt. Will it change the world? No, but it’s thinking forward.
***
I’d love to hear from you! If you have comments about this column or suggestions for future topics, send a note to Bonnie@BonnieHutchinson.com. I’ll happily reply within one business day.
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Camrose Swans and Roses Lions Club real tree lot

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The Swans and Roses Lions Club tree lot offers the experience of walking through a tree lot and picking out the perfect real tree.

By Lori Larsen

Looking for a real Christmas tree? Come down to the Camrose Swans and Roses Lions Club tree lot and pick out of a variety of beautifully groomed trees.
The tree lot is located at the north end parking lot of the Norsemen Inn–just look for the 14-foot Santa.
Trees of a variety of sizes are available in the old-fashioned lot that is festively decorated to add to the ambience.
The lot hours are Monday to Friday and Sunday from 1 p.m. until 6 p.m., Saturdays and 10 a.m. until 6 p.m.
“Last year, we actually ran out of trees earlier than expected, so we had to get a few more in,” said Lions member and organizer Gary Cunningham. “This year, we ordered more right from the get go.”
All the proceeds from the sale of trees go to support local charities through the Swans and Roses Lions Club. “When you buy trees from us, the money stays in town.”
A variety of sizes will be available and trees will be sold up until the last week before Christmas or until quantities last.
Volunteers will be on hand to help you unwrap your tree, ensuring it is the perfect fit for your home and will cut the bottom at your request.
“Dee Jay Plumbing and Heating is supplying us with a trailer again this year,” said Cunningham. “We use it for volunteers to stay warm and also as a temporary office area.
“That saves the Club having to bear the cost of renting one which adds to the funds we are able to give back to the community.”
The lot will stay open as long as supplies last or up until Dec. 24, which ever comes first.
Pack the family up in the car and drive down to Swans and Roses Lions tree lot and add one more amazing tradition to your holiday season–picking out the perfect tree.  read more

Intersection traffic device improves safety

By Lori Larsen

In an effort to reduce traffic collisions and increase overall motorist and pedestrian safety, City of Camrose council approved funding for the installation of an Intersection Safety Device (ISD) at the intersection of 68 Street and 48 Avenue, during a regular council meeting held in July.
“This has been a project that we have been examining for some time,” said Camrose Police Service Inspector John Corbett. “Beginning with a  traffic study in the summer of 2018 at this intersection, followed by an annual analysis of traffic and collisions at this site after which approvals were granted by the Camrose Police Commission and Camrose City Council in the spring and summer of 2019 respectively.”
Following these approvals,  processes were prepared to move the project forward in the late fall.
The device was installed in the latter part of November with preliminary testing to insure maximum efficiency. While motorists may have seen flashes from the camera, no violation tickets were being issued.
From the beginning of December until Jan 31, 2020, a public education phase will occur. The device will be fully operable and recording, but violators will be issued warning notices only.
“This notice will be exactly what is being issued for violations,” explained Corbett. “However, the warning phase will help us educate the public, get motorists to slow down and inform them of the device and that actual violation tickets will be issued beginning Feb. 1, 2020.”
The ISD, also referred to as a “red light” or “speed on green” camera, monitors intersections and photographs vehicles speeding through or failing to stop for red traffic lights.
“The devices are used to not only deter motorists from failing to stop at a red light or speeding through the intersection, but more importantly to lower the number and severity of collisions and improve overall safety of Camrose roadways,” explained Corbett.
Alarming statistics
On an average, in Alberta annually, 64 people die and 8,044 people are injured in motor vehicle collisions at intersections, many of which involve speeding.
Camrose is no exception. In 2018 there were 421 reported collisions on Camrose public roadways and parking lots, 169 of which occurred at intersections.
“This particular intersection was chosen because of its high incidence of collisions,” said CPS constable (traffic section) Marc Cossette. “This location has been the highest or second highest location for collisions in 14 of the past 15 years.”
In a recent survey conducted by CPS, residents of Camrose identified road safety as one of the most serious public safety issues in Camrose.
In 2018, in Camrose, 32 injuries were reported from motor vehicle collisions and in 2019 one fatality occurred as a result of pedestrian/motor vehicle collision occurring at an intersection.
“That particular incident occurred at an intersection not far from 68 Street and 48 Avenue (where the ISD is now located) where the rate of speed is similar,” remarked CPS constable Sarah Day, adding that the 68 Street and 48 Avenue intersection also has heavy foot traffic.
Other alarming statistics regarding motor vehicle collisions with pedestrians indicate that at 30 km/h five per cent of pedestrians are killed, at 50 km/h 55 per cent of pedestrians are killed and at 60 km/h 90 per cent of pedestrians are killed. The frightening reality is, those are the majority of posted speed limits within Camrose.
Intersections are dangerous parts of roadways and somewhat difficult for police to use conventional traffic safety enforcement.
“The 68 Street and 48 Avenue intersection is particularly challenging,” said Cossette. “Due to the infrastructure and high volume of traffic, it is difficult to detect and intercept violators at this intersection without unnecessary risk to the public.”
Not only is it difficult to monitor the four points of the intersection, watch the light and react to violations, but it poses safety risks for motorists and the police to conduct enforcement there in a police vehicle.
“The majority of severe collisions that involve injuries and property damage will likely occur in Camrose at intersections due to vehicles travelling in different directions and possibly crossing paths with each other,” said Cossette
Day added that the impact is often at the door of the vehicle which inevitably causes injury, often severe.
How it works
Cossette explained exactly how the ISD works. “The detection of speeding vehicles will be the same as photo radar, except the ISD device is stationary. It measures the speed of the violating vehicle, takes a photograph of the licence plate and then a violation ticket is sent to the registered owner of the motor vehicle involved in the violation.”
With regards to the operation of the red light camera, Cossette explained that, as soon as the red traffic light engages, a video recording is activated, and if a vehicle passes over the stop line after the red light engages, it will be recorded. “The system then takes a still photograph of licence plate and a violation ticket is mailed to registered owner of the offending vehicle.”
Cossette added that the violation ticket for failing to stop for a red light will contain information on the particulars of the offence including date/time, photograph of the licence plate and a link that can be accessed to view the video taken by the ISD of the offence.
Hefty fine
Come Feb. 1 when the device is live and violations will be issued, if a motorist proceeds through the intersection on a red light the stipulated fine is $388.
“It is also possible to be issued two violation tickets should a motorist not only fail to stop at a red light but proceed through the intersection in excess of the posted speed limit,” said Corbett.
Similar to violation tickets issued through any automated enforcement devices, there are no demerit points associated with the ISD controlled intersection and driving records and National Safety Code Profiles are not affected.
In accordance to automated enforcement guidelines peace officers will be trained and certified in reviewing and ultimately approving each violation ticket. As well, signage is required to be posted in advance of the intersection in all directions advising motorists there may be an ISD in operation. Information will be posted on the CPS website and annual reviews are conducted on all automated traffic programs.
In conclusion, Corbett said the cost of infractions and possible collisions extends beyond that of the fine and are almost 100 per cent preventable.
“These collisions are not insignificant events. They have a lot of impact on everybody in the community.
“It affects everyone–the victims and their families and friends, witnesses, first responders–the community as a whole.”
For more information on the ISD or any other automated enforcement programs visit www.camrosepoliceservice.ca.

Parking fees at St. Mary’s begin in the New Year

By Murray Green

It will cost you to park at Covenant Health St. Mary’s Hospital Camrose beginning on Jan. 1, 2020.
Visitors and the public will be charged for parking in the St. Mary’s Hospital parking lot.
“We would like to take this time to remind the Camrose community that the loading zone in front of the hospital is a fire lane, and those who are parked there for more than five minutes may also be ticketed or towed,” said site administrator Cherylyn Antymniuk.
The charge will be $1.25 for one hour or a maximum daily rate of $8.50 for a 24-hour period. Long-stay patients will receive a reduced rate of $15 per week or a maximum amount of $30 per month. St. Mary’s Hospital will have two payment kiosks set up within the parking lot and one kiosk station will be located inside the main entrance of the hospital.
“This change will make visitor parking at the hospital more available to our valued patrons and will support the costs of regular maintenance, asphalt and concrete repairs, and snow removal in our parking lots.”
A third party company will be patrolling the parking lot at random intervals throughout the week. Failure to pay for parking at St. Mary’s Hospital may result in a fine for illegal parking or your vehicle may be towed.
“The staff parking lot will also be monitored, as all our staff have been issued placards after paying for parking. If visitors do not wish to pay for parking at St. Mary’s, consider parking on 46 or 47 Avenue and completing the short walk to the hospital. We thank everyone for their cooperation in light of this change,” added Cherylyn.

Elk Island Schools approve a shortfall budget for 2020

By Murray Green

The Elk Island Catholic Schools (EICS) board of trustees approved the 2019-20 budget in light of the recent provincial budget announcements.
“After an initial examination of the October 2019 provincial budget, EICS is echoing the concerns expressed by many school boards across the province,” said board chair Ted Paszek. “For EICS, education funding is down significantly on a school year basis, as the Government of Alberta redistributed a few important grants. We were also hit very hard by an unprecedented increase in our insurance premium by 274 per cent. Coupled with copyright litigation that EICS was randomly selected as part of federal court litigation, we are faced with an approximately $3 million funding shortfall into this school year.”
During the spring budget, EICS made prudent decisions by finding efficiencies and proactively adjusting operations. At that time, over $2 million was reduced from the overall EICS budget in anticipation of provincial funding reductions.
“In the fall, we thoroughly reviewed our budget and operations to find efficiencies that were not already considered,” stated chair Paszek. “As always, our priority was to minimize the impact that any adjustments would have on the classrooms and service levels to our students.”
“We want to thank all members of the EICS school community for their continued support, as we work through these challenging times with hope for the future and confident that our actions and decisions are done in the best interests of our students.”
In Camrose, EICS schools include St. Patrick School and Our lady of Mount Pleasant.

Students make business pitches

By Murray Green

The University of Alberta Augustana Campus students, in the social sciences department, will be making Dragon’s Den-like pitches to learn about business.
The event will occur at the Jeanne and Peter Lougheed Performing Arts Centre on Thursday, Dec. 5 starting at 2:30 p.m.
Dragon’s Den is a collaboration between the Augustana Entrepreneurship Club and the Social Sciences Department’s Management faculty.
Over the 11-week fall semester there was a course offered for the first time at Augustana, the Entrepreneurship Class. In the course, students groups were tasked with the development of a business plan and a pitch for potential investors.
This event will share their projects and they will present their plans to a panel of judges consisting of various members of the community.
This event is an opportunity for students to pitch their final projects to the community to gain real-world experience. It is open to Augustana staff, students and the Camrose community.
RSVP by emailing augentrepreneurship@gmail.com or register at the door to win some prizes.

Running Vikings place two as All-Canadians

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University of Alberta Augustana Campus cross-country runners Reese Bendiksen, left, and Michio Green were named All-Canadians at the national competition. They celebrated with coach Gerhard Lotz, back.

By Murray Green

Reese Bendiksen ran six kilometres in 26:43.73 minutes to place 10th in the CCAA Cross-country National Championships in Grande Prairie on Nov. 8.
Michio Green placed eighth on the men’s side. He completed eight kilometres in 29:26.61 minutes.
Both Michio and Reese made the Alberta Colleges Athletic Conference Cross-country Running All-conference Team. Reese was also named the ACAC female rookie of the year.
Gerhard Lotz coached the team, along with assistant coach Robert Renman. “Both of them had a fantastic running year. All-Conference means they were in the top seven in ACAC; Michio was second and Reese was fifth. At nationals, where there is such tough competition, they were both in the top 10,” explained Gerhard.
“Augustana has very few All-Canadians and it is fantastic to have two in the same year. In the past, we have had some outstanding teams and runners, but not two top 10 at nationals. Both of our teams, female and male, were also top 10 with the men seventh and the women eighth. It was a great year for Augustana in running,” added Gerhard.
“It’s exciting because we are a fairly young team. Reese was a rookie and both of them will be back next year.”
Michio is a third year student and both runners are taking physical education at Augustana.
“The ACAC was a great race. I was fighting against a runner from the SAIT Trojans for second and I pulled away in the last 50 metres,” recalled Michio. “Nationals was different. It was such a large event. The conditions were not that great. We had a foot of snow and near the beginning was a bridge, which created a bottle neck. I was way behind in 36th on the first lap and had to work my way up through the deep snow.”
He worked hard to get to eighth place. “It was a pretty good finish for me. I’m proud of my improvements. The first year I was 55th, then 25th, so I’m improving.”
Reese came from Norway to compete for Augustana. “It was an amazing year. I didn’t expect to do that well because I didn’t train as much the last two years. The conditions at nationals were good for me because I am used to the cold weather.”
Receiving the rookie of the year award was a surprise. “It has inspired me to put in more training for next year. I need to be consistent and push myself even harder next year.” read more

Bake sale funds assist St. mary's cancer unit

By Murray Green


The University of Alberta Augustana Campus Vikings Women’s Volleyball team recently hosted a bake sale to raise funds for the Camrose Community Cancer Centre.
The variety of homemade goodies cooked up enough interest to bring in over $300 that was later donated to the Cancer Centre. The Breast Cancer Awareness Bake Sale began nine years ago when, then rookie player, Jill Metrunec had an idea to give back to the community and support a good cause.
“The bake sale is important to the team because it is a great opportunity for us to raise awareness, money and engagement for this cause” says captain of the women’s volleyball team Karen Wagner. “We’ve had fun planning and executing the bake sale each year and always look forward to supplying the school with goodies.”
The team hopes to continue the initiative into 2020, celebrating the 10th anniversary of an amazing event.
“It’s so rewarding having the money sent to a local cause,” said Wagner.
St. Mary’s Hospital volunteer and communications coordinator Kendra Ferguson hosted a tour of the Chemo Clinic for the team pointing out improvements, such as four heated massage chairs, heated blankets and a dedicated coffee station for patients and families, made to the centre as the result of funds raised by caring community members such as the Augustana women’s volleyball team.
Since opening in 1996, the chemo clinic at St. Mary’s has provided chemotherapy treatment to patients in Camrose and the surrounding area two times faster than in urban centres. The centre is capable of providing services to eight to 10 patients with a centre-dedicated chemotherapy physician, two registered nurses, three beds and four chairs.
For more information about the Chemo Clinic and how you can help through donating your time or resources, contact Kendra Ferguson at 780-679-6145, or kendra.ferguson@convenanthealth.ca.

Infinite presents dinner theatre

By Murray Green

You can enjoy music, theatre and a fine meal with Infinite Imagination’s  dinner theatre and show on Friday, Dec. 13 at the Bailey Theatre.
Enjoy a dinner and an evening of variety show entertainment in the same style of Saturday Night Live. The band Feyt plays new age rock and soloist Billy Haley will entertain with some Canadian folk tunes.
Infinite Imagination will mix it up with improv and scripted sketches for laughs at real life.
Doors open at 5:30 p.m., dinner is at 6:15 p.m. and curtain call is at 7:30 p.m.

Holiday train stops to support local Food Bank, share music

By Murray Green

The CP Holiday Train will stop in Camrose to support the local Food Bank, share great music and enhance the Christmas spirit.
“In 2018, Neighbor Aid assisted 1,886 families, averaging 157 hampers per month. We were able to meet these needs because of the generosity of Camrose and Camrose County residents. In 2019, our numbers have not gone down; food insecurities are real in our community. The CP Holiday Train is coming to Camrose again this year and we are excited to be a part of it. It is with events like this that support and rally for the local food bank and the support of our community that we can assist those in need,” said Jo-Anne Tweed, program director at Camrose Neighbor Aid Center.
The Canadian train departs Montreal on Nov. 26 and follow CP’s tracks west to Vancouver. Performing free concerts from Montreal to Calgary are Scott Helman and Madeline Merlo. CP Holiday Train will end the tour in the Vancouver area on Dec. 17.
The Holiday train will stop in Provost on Dec. 5 at 5:55 p.m. and then hits Hardisty (east end of CP railway yard, west of Highway 881 overpass) at 9 p.m.
On Dec. 6, the first stop is in Camrose at 52 Avenue and 50 Street, next to Moose Family Centre at 1:05 p.m. People are encouraged to bring an item for Neighbor Aid Centre’s Food Bank. After leaving, the train then goes to Wetaskiwin for a 3:25 p.m. show.
Celebrate the holiday season with Neighbor Aid and the Camrose Kodiaks hockey club and join in the recognition of the Food Bank presentation. The Holiday Train has raised over $13 million and 4.5 million pounds of food since 1999 to help those in need.
Santa will be handing out candy canes and everyone is encouraged to bring non-perishable items and monies for donations to Camrose and District Food Bank.
Hot dogs and hot chocolate will be available prior to the event.
Madeline Merlo is a Canadian country music singer-songwriter. She released her debut album, Free Soul, in 2016. A year before, she received the Rising Star award from the Canadian Country Music Association. She last appeared in Camrose at the Big Valley Jamboree on Aug. 4, 2017.
Since the May 2017 release of Scott Helman’s full-length album Hôtel De Ville, the four-time JUNO Award nominee has maintained a relentless touring schedule in support of the album and its hit singles “Kinda Complicated”, “Ripple Effect” and the gold-certified “PDA”.

Join homeschool choir for winter songs

By Murray Green

The Central Alberta Homeschool Choir will be holding a See Amid the Winter’s Snow concert at the Jeanne and Peter Lougheed Performing Arts Centre on  Sunday, Dec. 15 starting at 3:30 p.m.
The Central Alberta Homeschool Choir, in partnership with Rosedale Valley String Orchestra, bring a concert of Christmas music each year, as a fundraiser for the Christian Life Centre, which is a home for boys in Mwanza, Tanzania.
The students from both of these groups come from many locations in central Alberta, including Ponoka, Lacombe, Red Deer, Camrose, Wetaskiwin, Olds and Rocky Mountain House.

Strictly Business Christmas cabaret

By Murray Green

Strictly Business is back at the Jeanne and Peter Lougheed Performing Arts Centre for a full Christmas cabaret show featuring musical theatre, Christmas tunes and storytelling in a relaxed and entertaining atmosphere on  Friday, Dec. 13 beginning at 8 p.m.
A preview of the show was given during the Lougheed Centre’s season launch back in June.
Strictly Business Theatre is an Edmonton-based theatre company producing and performing both hilariously entertaining and heartwarming cabarets.
Kayla Nichol and Kelsey Visscher form Strictly Business Theatre, performing both hilariously entertaining and heartwarming cabarets, charm with their wit, musicality and a whole lot of humour. Join the cabaret to get into the Christmas spirit, while getting to know a couple of crazy singers. Strictly Business is anything but business.
Kelsey is a graduate of Grant MacEwan’s Theatre Arts Program. She has spent the last five years continuing her training in musical theatre performance both in Edmonton and in New York City. Kayla is an actor, singer, dancer and musician. She appeared in Bight Star at Rosebud Theatre. She is a also a graduate of MacEwan University, winner of the National Music Festival of Canada in Musical Theatre and went on to study voice and acting in New York.

ATP unveil Through the Years

By Murray Green

Through the Years encompasses different dance, acting and musical theatre numbers throughout the years starting in the 1920s with the Charleston.
Local theatre group About Time Productions will be presenting the event on Saturday, Dec. 7 at 7 p.m. in the Jeanne and Peter Lougheed Performing Arts Centre.
The singers will then travel in style through the years, with performers showcasing their talents and interpretations throughout the years.
Some of performances will include acts from the Paper Bag Princess and the The Goonies. Join ATP on a trip down memory lane with great costumes.

St. Patrick School will be holding concert at Lougheed

By Murray Green

St. Pat’s School will be staging its The Christmas Carol Special Report event on Monday, Dec. 16 and Tuesday, Dec. 17 beginning at 7 p.m. in the Jeanne and Peter Lougheed Performing Arts Centre.
It will feature two broadcasters announcing the evening news covering various parts of the world about Christmas traditions and carols.
Countries such as Australia, Italy and Russia will be featured by Grades 1 to 4 performing. Different students will be performing on each night.
Songs will reflect the various countries and how they celebrate the holiday season. Tickets are available at the Lougheed Centre.

Celebrate a Wright Christmas

By Murray Green

Country music star Michelle Wright is returning to Camrose to help us celebrate the holiday season. Her show Wright Christmas will be held on Saturday, Dec. 14 beginning at 7:30 p.m. in the Jeanne and Peter Lougheed Performing Arts Centre.
“I’ve enjoyed the Big Valley Jamboree, but I’m really looking forward to sharing my Christmas show in Camrose. My most fun thing to do is to go on my Christmas tour. It has a way of lifting your spirit and making you smile. It transcends me into being a bit childlike,” said Michelle.
Everyone has memories of Christmas as a child, but what is a Wright Christmas? “I couldn’t help myself and I’m Dreaming of a Wright Christmas,” Michelle laughed. “Our Christmas is tradition. I like to get the decorations up. I call myself the Martha Stewart of country because I like to decorate for the holidays and make it festive. We watch the same traditional movies every year. My husband is Italian and I’m Polish, so we always add an Italian dish and Polish dish to our Christmas dinner,” shared Michelle. “He also asked me to marry him on Christmas Day, so it is a special time for us.”
Her Christmas tour is a blend of music. “I try to give my concerts a balance. I try to make it Christmas, but people want to listen to some of my hits as well. I pepper in the hits because people still want to hear those songs as well.”
She likes to perform the traditional Christmas songs. “On some songs, I give them my take. I do a reggae version of ‘Little Drummer Boy’ and funky version of ‘Rudolph the Red Nosed Reindeer’ and I like the jazzy Christmas songs.”
She is one of the country’s most widely recognized and awarded female country singers of the 1990s, winning the Canadian Country Music Association’s Fans’ Choice Award twice.
She agreed her theatre songs are a little different than her BVJ shows. “I tend to pull it back a bit. The outdoor festivals are a bit more rocking and this tour is a little more relaxed,” shared Michelle.
“I’ll share some of my Christmas stories. The show is always about the audience and I get feedback from them as well. We’re thankful that we can come back to Camrose and we’ll have a good time. I want to help bring in the Christmas spirit. This is a family show, so people can bring the entire family.”
In 2004, she started her annual Christmas tour, Dreaming of a Wright Christmas. A year later, she released her first Christmas album, A Wright Christmas in Canada. The album featured covers of 11 Christmas songs and one new song, “I Know Santa’s Been Here,” written by Canadian country singer Patricia Conroy.
16 scheilke hutch

Donation of a lifetime of memories

The beautiful china hutch donated by the Schielke (Cunningham) family proudly takes up its new position in the Camrose Heritage Railway Station and Park.

By Lori Larsen

Within the walls of museums lay stories of the past, memories of different eras and often family mementos, found in the form of records or intricate pieces of clothing, decor or furniture.
Now, proudly standing in the King George Tea Room of the Camrose Heritage Railway Museum and Park, is a stunning piece of history, a decades-old china hutch generously donated by Joan Cunningham, daughter of Marie Schielke, daughter of Peter and Janet Stewart, original owners of the hutch.
“The King George Room is the most appropriate setting for the hutch,” said Camrose Heritage Railway Station Society chairperson and director Glenys Smith, grateful to the family for donating the hutch. “It was almost like that space was just waiting for the perfect piece.”
The hutch is not only a reminder of an era gone by,  but a reminder that donations, such as these, are what breaths life into museums and offers all who come to them an opportunity to peek into history.
Come visit the Railway Museum and have a seat in the King George Room, enjoy a refreshment and imagine the Stewart, Cunningham and Schielke family who once gathered around the hutch. Share, for just a moment, a piece of their history.
The Railway museum welcomes donations of pieces that can be used in the museum or items that can be sold in the White Elephant Gift Shop.
For more information on the Camrose Heritage Railway Station and Park, visit the website at http://canadiannorthern.ca/Camrose/. read more

Property taxes remain at 2019 rates with funding reductions

By Lori Larsen

During the Dec. 2 City of Camrose Committee of Whole meeting, council heard from general manager of Financial Services Travis Bouck that the City is expecting a  reduction in funding, from the provincial government, of approximately $630,000 in 2020 and further reductions to over $1.4 million annually by 2022.
The provincial government reduction in funding, coupled with a low projected growth rate and the opening of the aquatic centre, left council with some very difficult decisions.
“Everyone has been asked to look at service level reductions,” commented city manager Malcolm Boyd. “We brought those to council during the finance committee meetings and council had to make some tough calls. We do not like to see service level reductions but unfortunately the current economic climate is forcing our hand, and we have to respond.
“We heard very clearly that raising property taxes was not something that council would support. We have been able to propose a balanced budget that also allows us to replenish some depleted reserves.”
The finance committee met from Nov. 19 to 22 to deliberate the 2020 Budget, the 2021-22 operational forecast and the 10-year Capital Plan. Council is recommending a reduction to some community groups and organizations as well as some council committees.
“We value our community groups but these are tough times,” said Mayor Norm Mayer. “We are trying to be fair to everyone while prioritizing how we spend the citizens’ money.”
Additionally, council is recommending an increase to the franchise fees that the City receives from both electricity and natural gas providers.
“The City of Camrose depends upon the (Government of Alberta) funding received to complete large infrastructure projects–road construction, sidewalks, swimming pools, hockey rinks, buildings and many other items,” explained Bouck. “As a result, the City has decided to increase franchise fees on both electricity and natural gas to offset the provincial funding reduction in order to ensure that the infrastructure within the City does not deteriorate significantly.”
An increase to the electricity franchise fee, from 10 to 13 per cent, and an increase to the natural gas franchise fee, from 25 to 27 per cent, is proposed. “This puts Camrose under the 50th percentile among comparators for electricity and slightly over the 50th percentile for natural gas and keeps the City competitive in the region,” added Bouck.
After three years with zero per cent change, a one per cent water and wastewater utility fee increase is being proposed.
Another item of note is increased transfers to capital during 2020 to replenish the General Capital Reserve.
Council also recommended a freeze to all staff wages for non-union staff. There is also a reduction to staff by four full time positions and a reduction to the number of summer staff the City will be hiring in 2020. “The full time positions that have been reduced have all been dealt with through organizational changes implemented during late 2019 and through vacancies,” explained Boyd. “The seasonal staff reductions will have an impact on our level of service during the summer.”
Some of the service changes proposed this summer are a reduction in frequency of mowing to various areas across the city including park spaces, the airport, and the golf course and less flowerbeds being planted.
The City is also beginning the bargaining process with CUPE this week.
Council will finalize and approve the 2020 budget at the Dec. 16, regular council meeting.

Charity Checkstop reaches out

By Lori Larsen

Don’t forget to stop by the annual Charity Checkstop being held on Dec. 7 on the service road off 48th Avenue, eastbound in front of Camrose Registry from noon until 4 p.m. Members of Camrose Police Service and Camrose RCMP along with volunteers will be accepting donations for Camrose and District Victim Services Unit, The Camrose Open Door and Camrose Women’s Shelter.
“This is our 13th annual Charity Checkstop,” said Camrose Police Service fraud prevention and community relations officer Constable Kelly Bauer. “Thirteen years ago, members of the Camrose Police Service were looking for a way to assist local organizations with reaching their goals, whether they be monetary or in actual items of which they were in short supply. Right from the start, the Charity Checkstop became a success and it was obvious that we needed to continue the event.
“The community support has been overwhelming year after year. We have support at the event from local businesses who supply trailers, heaters (the weather has been unpredictable) and coffee and food for our volunteers. We also have support from our local radio station, New Country who are on location each year as well as the local media who promote before, during and after the event. And of course, we have amazing support from the community who graciously gives each year.”
Bauer said that knowing they are making a difference is what keeps the initiative going strong. “Each year, there are stories that melt our hearts. It could be a local business or family that donates a truckload of food that simply leaves many of us speechless with their generosity. Sometimes its a young child who saved their own money, bought a gift and personally donated it.
“Our Victim Services Unit, The Camrose Open Door and the Camrose Women’s Shelter will be the beneficiaries of your generosity at this year’s Charity Checkstop. Police often have a different perspective of what is happening in our community and these organizations have been key in helping people of all ages who are facing significant challenges in life and are needing assistance.”
Camrose Women’s Shelter executive director Nora-Lee Rear said. “Thanks to people in Camrose and area for supporting the event each year and realizing that no matter how difficult times are for themselves, that there are always people who are in greater need. Members of Camrose Police Service and Camrose RCMP and volunteers will be accepting monetary donations, gift cards, nonperishable food items and personal care supplies to be donated to the Camrose and District Victim Services Unit (CDVSU), Camrose Open Door and Camrose Women’s Shelter.
“Being a part of Charity Checkstop makes a huge difference for the Shelter as we start to think about the families we support for Christmas. We currently have about 54 families in outreach for whom the Shelter tries to provide small hampers as well as hampers for anyone who stays at the Shelter during the holidays. Imagine the difference a Christmas present makes in the life of a child who has to stay in a strange bedroom, with strange people, sometimes in a strange town.
“That’s how Charity Checkstop benefits the Shelter, as recipients of Camrose’s kindness, everyone the Shelter assists over the holidays will receive at least one gift, compliments of Charity Checkstop. Thank you, Camrose and area!”
Monetary donations will be used to train advocates to aid victims of crime and tragedy in City of Camrose and Camrose County.
Stop by and reach out a hand to donate to organizations that assist those in need in our community. While you are at it, shake the hand of a member of one of our local policing agencies to thank them for stepping up to the plate to help.

Wall of Fame inductees honoured at ceremony

19 cchs wall of fame
École Camrose Composite High School Wall of Fame honourees, from left to right, are Rajan Rathnavalu, Doris Anderson (distinguished faculty), Dr. Lanette Prediger (2018 honouree) and Dr. Brendan Lord. Missing from photo is Dr. John Pattison-Williams.

By Lori Larsen

Don’t forget to stop by the annual Charity Checkstop being held on Dec. 7 on the service road off 48th Avenue, eastbound in front of Camrose Registry from noon until 4 p.m. Members of Camrose Police Service and Camrose RCMP along with volunteers will be accepting donations for Camrose and District Victim Services Unit, The Camrose Open Door and Camrose Women’s Shelter.
“This is our 13th annual Charity Checkstop,” said Camrose Police Service fraud prevention and community relations officer Constable Kelly Bauer. “Thirteen years ago, members of the Camrose Police Service were looking for a way to assist local organizations with reaching their goals, whether they be monetary or in actual items of which they were in short supply. Right from the start, the Charity Checkstop became a success and it was obvious that we needed to continue the event.
“The community support has been overwhelming year after year. We have support at the event from local businesses who supply trailers, heaters (the weather has been unpredictable) and coffee and food for our volunteers. We also have support from our local radio station, New Country who are on location each year as well as the local media who promote before, during and after the event. And of course, we have amazing support from the community who graciously gives each year.”
Bauer said that knowing they are making a difference is what keeps the initiative going strong. “Each year, there are stories that melt our hearts. It could be a local business or family that donates a truckload of food that simply leaves many of us speechless with their generosity. Sometimes its a young child who saved their own money, bought a gift and personally donated it.
“Our Victim Services Unit, The Camrose Open Door and the Camrose Women’s Shelter will be the beneficiaries of your generosity at this year’s Charity Checkstop. Police often have a different perspective of what is happening in our community and these organizations have been key in helping people of all ages who are facing significant challenges in life and are needing assistance.”
Camrose Women’s Shelter executive director Nora-Lee Rear said. “Thanks to people in Camrose and area for supporting the event each year and realizing that no matter how difficult times are for themselves, that there are always people who are in greater need. Members of Camrose Police Service and Camrose RCMP and volunteers will be accepting monetary donations, gift cards, nonperishable food items and personal care supplies to be donated to the Camrose and District Victim Services Unit (CDVSU), Camrose Open Door and Camrose Women’s Shelter.
“Being a part of Charity Checkstop makes a huge difference for the Shelter as we start to think about the families we support for Christmas. We currently have about 54 families in outreach for whom the Shelter tries to provide small hampers as well as hampers for anyone who stays at the Shelter during the holidays. Imagine the difference a Christmas present makes in the life of a child who has to stay in a strange bedroom, with strange people, sometimes in a strange town.
“That’s how Charity Checkstop benefits the Shelter, as recipients of Camrose’s kindness, everyone the Shelter assists over the holidays will receive at least one gift, compliments of Charity Checkstop. Thank you, Camrose and area!”
Monetary donations will be used to train advocates to aid victims of crime and tragedy in City of Camrose and Camrose County.
Stop by and reach out a hand to donate to organizations that assist those in need in our community. While you are at it, shake the hand of a member of one of our local policing agencies to thank them for stepping up to the plate to help. read more

Radio listener wins 1954 GMC truck in contest

By Murray Green

When CFCW radio station turned 65 on Nov. 2, it was decided to give away a truck. Back during the 50th anniversary of the station’s start date they held a contest to win a 1954 GMC truck.
After several years at the owner’s place in Vegreville, he sold it back to the station. The station held a contest to honour 65 years in business and gave it away again. Two entries from each location that hosted the truck in the summer and fall were drawn to select the 65, contestants that have a chance to win it. Phil Holtskog of Spruce Grove won the truck.
“We were brainstorming on what to do for our Drive to 65 with CFCW turning 65. We ran into Jerry Hudema, who won the truck 15 years ago. He told us he is getting older and his children are not into the truck, so he asked if we wanted it back. We thought it was an awesome idea and bought it back from him,” explained Jackie Rae Greening of CFCW.
“It all started around what to do considering we started in 1954. We wondered what would bring back wonderful memories. As soon as we thought about a truck, the stories came out about how this person had a 1952 and this person had a 1953. People remember these trucks. It has a three on the tree and I don’t drive the truck.”
The contest started with 65 contestants and was a reverse draw, so the last person standing won the truck.
“I couldn’t believe it happened to me, I never win anything. I wasn’t even going to register, but my wife Judy insisted. It is because of her that I even qualified,” said the new owner, Phil.
“They had the truck on location across Alberta and two or three names were drawn at each location the truck was at. My name was drawn, so I went to the final event. It was a reverse draw, which is maybe why I won. My name is always the last to be drawn,” he laughed. “It was pretty nerve-racking, to be honest. The last 10 were done live in the studio and Nick Gulka was announcing and he told me to breathe. I couldn’t believe I was the last person standing.”
Phil appreciated the opportunity to drive home his prize. “I like old vehicles; I’m currently re-building a 1967 Chrysler, but this one means a lot. My dad had one just like it, except it was a 1952,” revealed Phil. “The fact that the truck is restored and runs, is drivable, means I don’t have to do anything to it.”
The truck was kept in great shape and road worthy over the years.
“My wife joked with the people at the station that we were going to paint the truck green and put a big S on the doors. We are big (Saskatchewan) Roughrider fans. They said we can do anything with it and to enjoy it,” shared Phil.
Phil instantly enjoyed driving the classic home and has plans for the vehicle next summer.
“I will go to a few car shows with it and simply enjoy driving it on Sunday afternoons. At some point the decals will be coming off. The radio station wouldn’t mind if they stayed on (for advertising). I may come to the Camrose show to display the truck at the car show, so everyone can see the truck again.”
To make space for the truck in the garage, Phil sent the other vehicles to the curb. “Judy encouraged me to enter this contest, but she is thinking twice about it now because her car is now parked outside instead. She thinks the truck is hers anyway, since she encouraged me to enter my name,” said Phil.

FUN FACTS
The years 1947 to 1955 were called the Chevrolet advance design of trucks. The same basic design family was used for all of its trucks including the suburban, panel trucks, canopy express and cab overs.
The only year for significant design changes was in 1954. Windshield was a curved one-piece glass without centre vertical dividing strip. It featured revised steering wheel and dashboard. Cargo bed rails, previously angled, were now horizontal. Tail lights round instead of rectangular. Grille changed from five horizontal slats to crossbar design, commonly referred to as a “bull nose” grille. Engines were mostly a 235 cubic inch straight-six. Serial number codes were unchanged from 1953. Hydramatic automatic transmission was available for the first time as a paid for option.

Don’t leave your vehicle idling

By Murray Green

Do not leave your vehicles unattended, while they are running. These vehicles are easy targets for theft.
With the weather getting colder, police are urging citizens to be careful when warming up their vehicles. Car thieves actively look for easy vehicles to steal. Vehicles that are left running and unlocked outside of homes, grocery stores, or even gas stations make for easy targets for criminals. It only takes a few seconds for someone to sit in the driver’s seat and drive away. These vehicle thefts are often preventable.
Keyless starting vehicles will not shut down if they are out of range from the key fob. This is a built-in safety feature. Do not leave these vehicles running.
If you must leave your vehicle running, consider use a club-like device or a remote starter to deter thieves.
Lock your vehicle. Most vehicle thefts and thefts from vehicles occur to vehicles that are left unlocked.
Remove all valuables from your vehicle. Out of sight, out of mind approach.
Report any suspicious activity you might see in your neighbourhood. This is an excellent way to help reduce crime within the community.
Park your vehicle in well-lit areas. Turn on your residential exterior lights and help light up the area.
Contact local police if you have any information regarding a crime. If you wish to remain anonymous, you can contact Crime Stoppers at 1-800-222-8477 (TIPS), online.

Drive for the conditions and have a safer trip

By Lori Larsen

Combine fluctuating outside temperatures with a mix of precipitation and the results are very slippery often unpredictable road conditions.
As the holiday season approaches travel on the roadways gets a little busier, whether it is visitors coming to Camrose and area or residents out and about running more errands; so residents are reminded of a few simple tips prior to getting behind the wheel to make your travelling safer for everyone.
First and foremost if the road conditions are deemed to be extremely hazardous, consider making alternative travel arrangements, such as postponing your trip until the conditions improve.
Haste is waste they say and this is especially true when it comes to motor vehicle collisions. Plan for plenty of time to get to your destination. Prior to getting on the road, clear frost and snow from all of your vehicle windows, side mirrors, headlights and tail lights and ensure the inside defroster is working and has cleared windows.
Top up your fuel. If traveling any distances this could be a vital decision should you become stranded due to unpredictable weather conditions.
In blowing snow or fog conditions your vehicle may not be as visible as usual, so it is advised to increase the distance between your vehicle and others, signal well in advance of turning to give other motorists time to anticipate and react appropriately and keep your headlights on all the time, don’t rely on daytime running lights. Low beams are more effective than high beams in fog or heavy snow conditions.
Checking side mirrors and doing shoulder checks is a must in any driving conditions.
Slow down and drive with caution when the roads are wet or icy. Remember that braking is greatly affected by these road conditions.
Ensure your vehicle tires are in very good condition. Good winter tires are highly recommended.
Always carry an emergency kit in your vehicle. The kit can include, food (that won’t spoil), water, first aid kit, blanket, whistle, wind-up flashlight, jumper cables, salt/sand, tow rope, fire extinguisher, extra clothing (including gloves), and road maps. Even when you are travelling within the City, a stalled vehicle equates to a cold vehicle.

What’s up in the manger

By Lori Larsen

Life is a little more exciting out on the Spruce View Acres Simmental farm these days with the addition of not one, not two, but three baby calves. That’s right triplets.
Tracy and Steve Kushnerik are the proud cattle parents of three healthy, frisky, adorable calves Remi, Roscoe and Ruby, born to mama cow Jubilee on Nov. 25.
“They were six days early,” said Tracy of the triplets. “But they were all born naturally and came out in the natural position.”
When Tracy noted that Jubilee was taking longer than usual to calve, she decided to go out and check on her welfare.
“I physically checked her out to make sure the calf was positioned correctly, then out came the first calf.”
Thinking that Jubilee might be giving birth to twins, Tracy once again did a physical exam of the mom only to discover another set of feet and she thought maybe even a third calf.
“The second calf was born right away and everything went well, so I decided to check one more time and low and behold a third calf was born,” said Tracy with unbridled excitement.
The calves weighed in at birth at 68, 70 and 72 pounds respectfully and are healthy and thriving, and Jubilee, albeit tired, did awesome.
“This was such a big surprise.” Tracy’s excitement was still very apparent four days later, as she tried to explain the feeling she got when the calves were born. “I am such a lover of the cattle industry and so this was like winning the lottery and I don’t mean in the way of revenue.”
Triplets in any species is a phenomena but in the beef cattle industry the probability of triplets (especially three healthy calves) equates to one in every 100,000.
“The chance is a little higher with Simmental breeds,” explained Tracy. “They are normally more fertile.”
So Jubilee’s addition to the farm was a rare one and a happy one.
Just five days prior to the triplets being born another cow, Jenny, gave birth to twins but unfortunately both calves passed away.
“I thought I would bring Jenny into the barn with Jubilee and the triplets to see if any of the calves would graft to her. As it is Jenny took to all three of the calves and Jubilee and Jenny got along. Now both the cows are nursing and taking care of the triplets.”
Tracy noted that after Jenny lost her twins she was not eating and walking around with her head down, very listless. “The minute I put her (Jenny) in the barn she perked right up.”
Now the triplets have two mamas looking after their best interest. Nature certainly has a way of working things out.
While the farming life is not for everyone, for Tracy it is not so much about providing a living but giving a life.
“It’s been a tough year for all farmers, grain and cattle, this was the pick me up I needed.” And despite having once told husband Steve that if she ever had triplets she would give up cattle farming, her tune has changed.
Now she’s aiming for quadruplets.

Camrose County to hold tax sale

By Murray Green

Camrose County will be conducting a tax sale on Dec. 13 at the County office.
Five properties will be put up for bid at 9:30 a.m. Annually, municipalities are required under the MGA to offer for sale by public auction any properties that have taxes in arrears for three years. Administration has reviewed all such properties and presented the reserve bid amounts for those properties that are required to be offered in the tax sale at the regular council meeting on Nov. 26.
Bids will be accepted using cash, registered cheque and bank draft by Wes Bowie, assessment manager.
For more information on the five properties, contact Camrose County.
Traffic circle
The County learned that a study showed that a traffic circle should be installed at the junction of Highways 13 and 56 by Alberta Transportation. However, the provincial government hasn’t indicated when the project will proceed, or the cost of the project.
Agricultural services
Kevin MacDonald was named the new manager of agricultural services for the County. He will move into this position on Dec. 16.

Kodiaks close the gap on Oilers

By Murray Green

The Camrose Kodiaks are getting closer to knocking off one of the teams above them in the standings. Although they lost 3-2 in a shootout to the Okotoks Oilers on Nov. 26, the Kodiaks pushed the second place team to play its best.
Camrose played well defensively in the first to end the period with no score. In the middle frame, Okotoks opened the game up with two markers.
The Kodiaks were determined to get back in to the game in the third period and netted goals from Erik Miller and Connor Brock on the power play to even the score.
After a scoreless overtime, the contest was decided in the shootout. Goalie Griffin Bowerman stopped 30 of 32 shots, while Camrose recorded 30 shots on goal.
The Kodiaks peppered the Drumheller Dragons with 41 shots, but skated away on the wrong side of a 5-1 score on Nov. 23.
The Dragons turned up the heat in the first period by taking a 3-0 lead. Camrose fought back in the second, but only had a Cody Laskosky marker to show for its efforts. Drumheller added two more goals in the third. Bowerman started the game in net for Camrose, turning away seven of 10 shots. Cole Tisdale replaced him and stopped 13 of 15 shots.
Bear facts
The Camrose Kodiaks traded 20-year-old Jacob Kendall to the Sherwood Park Crusaders for 18-year-old Brett Wiescherster and future considerations.
“We would like to thank Jacob for his hard work and dedication. He will be missed, but as a 20-year-old, he wanted this opportunity and we made it happen,” said general manager Boris Rybalka. “We wish Jacob all the best not only in Sherwood Park, but next year and the future as well.”
The trade gave the Kodiaks a player they could have in their line-up for up to two years.
“He plays the game the way we like, he competes, battles and has skill to go with that size. He has leadership qualities.”
The Dec. 6 game will be the Stollery Jerseys/Teddy Bear Toss match against the Canmore Eagles. Bring a gift for a child to the game to be donated.
Defenceman Robert Kincaid of the Kodiaks has been invited to tryout for Team Canada West. The team plays in the World Junior A Challenge in Dawson Creek, BC starting on Dec. 7.

Hockey Vikings struggle to find game against SAIT Trojans

By Murray Green

The Augustana Vikings dropped a two-game series against SAIT on Nov. 22 and 23. The Trojans won 8-5 in Camrose and 3-0 in Calgary.
In the first game, Lukas Biensch scored the only tally in the opening period.  After a wild middle frame,  the game was knotted at 4-4 with Joe Tambasco, Austin Kozluk and Travis Mayan connecting for the Vikings.
SAIT pulled away in the third with four goals. Adam Osczevski scored a short-handed marker for Augustana. Goalie Curtis Skip stopped 28 of 26 shots for the Vikings.
In the rematch, the teams played better defensively. Goalie Zach deGraves turned away 26 of 29 shots he faced in the Vikings’ net.
Augustana split a two game series with the Concordia Thunder with identical 3-2 scores. The Vikings lost the opening game on the road, but won at home, Nov. 15 and 16.
Volleyball
Augustana took two matches from the Grande Prairie Wolves, 3-2 and 3-0 on Nov. 22 and 23.
The Wolves were hungry in the first meeting, but the Vikings were more determined in the deciding game that counted the most.
The Vikings were led by Justine Collin with eight kills, Sarah Dedrick recorded 22 assists and Collin also collected 11 digs.
In the second meeting, Addi Wolosuk with 10 kills, Sarah Dedrick counted 31 assists and Collin had seven digs.
The women’s squad lost 3-2 at home and 3-0 on the road to the Lakeland Rustlers on Nov. 15 and 16.
At home, the Vikings were led by Shay Boyes with 16 kills, Sarah Dedrick recorded 31 assists and Dedrick also collected 20 digs.
On the road, Boyes Rae Metrunec and Justine Collin all led the Vikings with only four kills, Dedrick counted 21 assists and Boyes had 11 digs. The team has a 6-4 record and are in third place.
Augustana men’s team also swept the Wolves 3-2 and 3-1 in matches.
 In the first match, Connor Sinnamon led the Vikings with 11 kills, Benjamin Linsley recorded 26 assists and both Even Richard and Owen Murray had seven digs each.
In the second outing, Murray led the Vikings with 12 kills, Calder Thompson earned 29 assists and both Thomas Zimmerman and Thompson had seven digs each.

Births and Deaths

Births
- To Rachelle and Cody Siemens of New Norway, a son on November 19.
- To Lindsay and Joel Babcock of Ponoka, a daughter on November 19.
- To Kayla Wenig and Matty Reber of Bawlf, a son on November 21.
- To Laurel and Mark Warkentin of Camrose, a son on November 21.
- To Jodi and Phil Chanasyk of Killam, a son on November 22.
- To Kristy and Garrett Jackson of Forestburg, a daughter on November 22.

Deaths
- Esther Eva Mostowich of Camrose, on November 23, at 78 years of age.
- Terry Sutherland of Camrose, on November 25.
- Avery "Casey" Caseley of Camrose, on November 25, at 90 years of age.
- Norman William Tennant of Bawlf, on November 27, at 83 years of age.
- Margaret Dickson of Calgary, formerly of Tofield, on November 27, at 93 years of age.