Forest fires

August 10, 2021

I lived in 100 Mile House, BC from 1980 to 2000 and never experienced any wild fires.
We were always worried about a cigarette off Highway 97, because we were always dry in the summer.
Now, in five years, they have had two major fires–that’s what happens when you have no logging–forestry.
You have to manage the forests so you don’t have runaway fires; you have to cut lines to stop it.
All you hear about is climate change. It has gone from global warming that didn’t say enough. Climate change still doesn’t say enough. Now, this year, it is climate crisis. That is all they have to say. Say it louder. Say it all the time.
Where are the forestry companies, why don’t they speak up?
Do the right management and at least people and animals have a chance.
Also, why is our military not trained and deployed at the first sign of fires, not a month into the season?
Sheila Faulkner,
Donalda,

Sunshine list

August 10, 2021

Education, the 14th on Sievers Jan. 14 top expense-claimers, claimed $74,188.62 (a relatively low claim). But Alberta Education also has 148 on Alberta’s Sunshine List, costing Alberta taxpayers roughly $16 million. But those salaries of over $109,000 often come with additional non-cash and cash benefits.
For example, deputy Clarke’s $286,900 salary comes with $8,000 cash and $63,600 non-cash benefits (plus his roughly $9,000 in expense claims), leaving Alberta taxpayers with a tab of just under $400,000 for this one deputy minister. (See “Alberta paid out $2.3 million in expenses…”, Sievers, Jan. 14). And, that’s just under $12 million/year for Alberta’s current 28 deputy/assistant deputy ministers.
That makes it totally unjustifiable to cut to education or nurses’ salaries, which would only save this government a couple of million dollars.  
Marion Leithead,
Bawlf

Driverless taxis

August 10, 2021

I have been a taxi driver for 27 years. I do remember the long hours and the abysmal pay which most taxi drivers all receive. Most taxi companies are short drivers which brings to my mind this one question. What about driverless taxis?
China is planning on putting one thousand driverless taxis on the road. There will be one significant change in how people interact with their taxi drivers.
What happens if your address is not on the GPS? What happens if you were a customer who did not bring any money? What happens if you try to run instead of paying for your taxi fare?
Well, you might have to prepay your ride, so this might not be too much of a problem. Would the driverless taxi take cash, or will it all be collected from your credit card?
This could solve the problem of a lack of drivers and stop people from ripping off this poor underpaid taxi driver. This is just something for all of you to ponder as you all try to survive the extreme heat.
Lorne Vanderwoude, Camrose

Not educated

August 3, 2021

How about Premier Jason Kenney’s idea to disenfranchise some taxpayers and just let the constituents who are currently policed by the RCMP vote on whether to keep the RCMP? By that logic, only parents would have a say on whether to proceed with the 2021 Draft Curriculum. Instead, minister LaGrange is trying to silence and disenfranchise the parents.
Education minister LaGrange has announced that she is accepting applications for a new Parent Advisory Council. The definition, from the government’s web page, is: “The Minister’s Parent Advisory Council is the voice of parents in Alberta.” The voice of parents in Alberta.  Alarm bells are ringing in all the other groups who thought they were the voice of at least some of the parents in Alberta.
The Alberta School Councils Association (ASCA) has democratically elected leadership representing over 1,300 school councils in Alberta. Their policy positions have been communicated to the minister, but there has been no response.
 It appears the minister is replacing a democratically elected body with one of 40 hand-picked, well-vetted members, whose input will be limited to responding as individuals three or four times a year during Zoom meetings…and whose input may then quite possibly be ignored.
Certainly ASCA and other groups and individuals are feeling ignored. Parents concerned about the draft curriculum swamped the minister’s office with so many phone calls and emails that they brought in staff from other departments. For example, the government is still insisting that the draft curriculum, is age appropriate. At a recent “Have Your Say” information session, parents were told that age-appropriateness was, in fact, “top of mind” during curriculum development.
Let’s look at the Social Studies curriculum for Grade 2 (think seven-year-olds, and about 120 instructional minutes per week for SS): Explain belief systems associated with Judaism, Christianity and Islam. Create a timeline for the rise and fall of the Roman Empire. Distinguish between Roman and Greek contributions to modern life. Explain the significance of Charlemagne’s rule in the medieval era. Explain the changes in the law in medieval England. Ask questions: Was the Magna Carta the beginning of English democracy?
This is just a fraction of what appears in the skills section for SS in Grade 2 and it all sounds like essay questions for university courses. The minister insists this curriculum is age appropriate. It is not. It is dangerously inappropriate and will lead to stress and failure.
Karen Green,
Sherwood Park

Top heavy

August 3, 2021

In addition to Lindberg’s notation re: Kenney’s cavalier waste of roughly $1.3 plus billion on the Keystone X Pipeline, and his $4.5 billion oil company tax cut, your readers need to know that Alberta’s UCP’s ministers and staffers got $2.3 million of our hard-earned tax dollars last year, via just their Expense Claims (Siever; Jan. 14; “Expenses paid out to ministers and staffers...).
Kenney also forgave oil and gas companies roughly $245 million that counties/rural Albertans have to make up. Plus, Albertans are also burdened with the estimated $269 billion needed to clean-up Alberta’s 91,000 inactive wells and 2,992 orphaned wells.(Oct. 16, 2020; The Canadian Press).
What about dealing with and recouping these billions first, and cutting MLAs’, ministers’ and staffers’ salaries till they are equivalent to the lower standards in other provinces...before badgering the nurses for that three to five per cent cut to their salaries?
As Lindberg previously noted this UCP crew is a “baffling group.” A baffling and unscrupulously greedy cadre.
Marion Leithead,
Bawlf

Medical services

July 27, 2021

A few weeks ago, my granddaughter required the services of the Emergency Medical Services (EMS) and the emergency department at St. Mary’s Hospital. The people of Camrose and surrounding area are extremely fortunate to have the services of such dedicated individuals.
The ambulance attendants were the most knowledgeable, caring young women. Not only to my granddaughter, but to me as I waited for updates to her condition.   The doctors and nurses in the emergency department were also the most caring people.
They kept us informed at every step of medical procedures. When the decision was made that there needed to be a transfer to intensive care at the U of A hospital, again the ambulance attendants, doctors and nurses were wonderful. They made sure the family knew exactly where to go at the U of A Hospital.  The medical staff at the U of A Hospital were provided with the phone number of my daughter and son-in-law to keep them informed until they arrived at the hospital.
Many many thanks to EMS and St. Mary’s Hospital emergency doctors and nurses. You are sincerely appreciated.
A big thanks to the off-duty Camrose Police officer who saw my granddaughter fall. He quickly went over to her and called 911. A big thanks to my granddaughter’s co-worker Garth who came looking for her when she didn’t arrive at work like she normally did. He saw what had happened and quickly called her dad.  Camrose is full of great people.
Thankfully, my granddaughter is now home recuperating.
Penny D. Fox,
Camrose

Give them knowledge

July 27, 2021

I would like to say that I agree with the education insight of David Livingstone, PhD, writer of an Epoch Times article where he concludes NDP critic Sarah “Hoffman is wrong…it [our soon new K-6 curriculum] brings knowledge back into the curriculum.” The theory of Discovery Learning (DL) that Hoffman and now Karen Green of Sherwood Park support has been a failure in the classroom over the past few decades. I found DL actually means to dumb-down our children (teachers know that what they were teaching to a Grade 3 class in the ’70s was being taught to a Grade 5 class in the ’90s) plus all advanced classes for the early grades were removed; today, they are removing advanced programs from high schools in the name of “inclusion”. I withdrew my children from the public school system in the ’90s because of this mediocrity in education with no celebration of diversity or interests and abilities of the students.
Shame on the mindless adults who pick and choose at: diversity, inclusion, equity (DIE) and do so on the backs and minds of our children and their future.
Our children need the opportunity to think from a mindset of knowledge that they have been able to accumulate year upon year–this is what the new curriculum is designed to do, without controlling the method teachers choose to implement it. I’m quite tired of hearing about the lies that the UN Agenda, some politicians and others want taught in our classrooms: e.g. that socialism is good when all socialist countries fail (even Sweden is changing its socialist policies); the latest lie of DIE education is: white settlers were evil and Aboriginals honourable.
Why are the governments pushing to give all land to Aboriginals? (It doesn’t make sense, considering that the tribes of Aboriginals were actually killing each other off to the point of maybe 8,000 living in North America at the time the white man arrived.) Is it because the UN globalists want the land and it would be easier to confiscate it from five per cent of the population–the Aboriginals–than to confiscate it from the white and black population that own it today?
Be awake to the lies that the UN (globalists) pass down to our governments, similar to how WHO (globalists) has passed lies to our medical people about the China-covid-19 virus, who in turn have passed it on to us.
Tina Kawalilak,
Camrose County

Top heavy

July 27, 2021

I would like to comment on the letter which Mark Lindberg wrote in the July 20 Camrose Booster.  I agree with him that these oil companies should not spend so much money on the top management of their company.  Now, this is my opinion only and all of you can take this or leave this.
I work for a private company and I am proud to stand behind what our company has done in the health care field. Our company is a non profit organization which is the model which all health organizations should follow. Our company cut from the top and added to the bottom.  From what I see is that these places are cutting from the bottom in order to protect the wages of those in the top of the company. I believe that, in my opinion, every health care company should be a non profit.
This means that the boards are volunteering their time. Government money should all go to the bottom to fund where the help is needed the most. Now, cutting the wages of nurses and doctors is the wrong way to go. Why not cut the unnecessary positions in the top management while adding to the bottom so that Albertans will be looked after? This is just something for all of you to ponder. This is my opinion only and like I have stated, take it or leave it.
Lorne Vanderwoude,
Camrose

Residential schools

July 13, 2021

When it comes to residential schools here in Canada, I do not remember hearing about such an event when I was going to school in my little town of Sedgewick. I went to school from 1974-87. As I think about these special schools, what happened when the federal and provincial government taught them to be Europeans and stop being savages? This was an attitude of the time here in our history. As I read books from this time period, I remember how these wild savages needed to be taught to be proper citizens of this new country called Canada. Now, people are waking up to realize that when these poor people complained about the treatment which they were receiving were really making a good point of the mistreatment their people were receiving. It is too bad that it took this long to understand that over one hundred years ago, our ancestors took away many different culture groups–their language and culture–without even making waves in the European immigrants who came to this new country, unless this was the main attitude of the majority of those who travelled here to this new country which was owned by a group of people who did not believe that they truly owned the land on which they roamed. Is it really too late to make these wrongs right?  It is too bad that it has taken this long to understand which wrongs were done against these people. However, the past cannot be reversed; returning these people their rights to have their language and culture is a good start in this healing process.
Lorne Vanderwoude,
Camrose

New normality

July 13, 2021

Let’s compare Premier Kenney’s claims re: Crushing COVID-19 and its variants’ risks (Returning to a sense of normality, Camrose Booster, July 6) with what Dr. Deena Henshaw stated.
Kenney claims, “We have crushed COVID-19 and with cases plummeting and vaccine uptake climbing, we are Open for Summer.” Misleading, to say the least, when the (July 6) Calgary Zone has 374 active cases, with 69 still in hospital (…and 140 hospitalized province-wide). Plus, Kenney’s attempts to promote the “safety” of the Calgary Stampede, also totally ignore the increasing (Delta) “variant” cases (i.e. 21 new variant cases, July 6).
Dr. Henshaw (in that same article) remarked, “We are entering a new phase in our fight against this virus…I encourage every Albertan to continue to get their vaccines, make safe choices…,” which in plain English, contradicts Kenney’s claim.
Before making his declaration, Kenney should also have checked The Economist (July 3: “Back to the Future”…and below the 66 average of the 50 countries used in this “Normalcy” Index (economist.com/normalcytracker).
The Economist’s Normalcy Index “tracks three types of activity: 1. ravel, split between roads, flights and public transport; 2. eisure time, divided among hours spent outside of homes, cinema revenues and attendance at sporting events; 3. ommercial activity, measured by footfall in shops and offices.” The Index uses data of 50 countries (which account for 76 per cent of the world’s population and 90 per cent of its GDP) and measures the change in each factor from pre-covid levels, averaging the changes in each category; and then averaging the grouped results together.
The Index relative to a pre-covid norm of 100 was calculated…most Western countries ranked near the 66 average (America at 73, the EU 71, Australia 70 and Britain 62). “Both Hong Kong and New Zealand, the leaders at 96 and 88, enjoy nearly full normalcy…”, whereas Canada sits at just under 60, a long ways from Kenney’s declared having “crushed COVID”. And, a long way below Hong Kong’s 96 and New Zealand’s 88.
Of the eight activities used in The Economist’s Index, three were subject to legal orders: cinemas, sporting events, and flights. “All three remain 70 to 85 per cent below the pre-covid baseline today.” That defies Kenney’s claim of “having crushed Covid-19.” And, should clearly indicate the risks the Stampede poses during this pandemic.
Food for thought: What is normalcy/normality right now anyway?
M.R. Leithead,
Bawlf

 

Rude protestors

July 13, 2021

You are not going to find a bigger critic of the UCP than me. For the record, I think Tylor Shandro is doing a terrible job as health minister. In fact, I think he’s the worst health minister this province has ever had.
However, what happened to him and his family on Canada Day was completely unacceptable. Anti-maskers crowded around him and his wife and children, yelling obscenities and threatening all of them. This mob went after his children. To illustrate their complete lack of knowledge, one of these so-called protestors yelled at one of his kids, “Sorry, bud, but your dad is a war criminal.”
What war? What crimes? These people are delusional hooligans just like their internet “heroes”.
Is this what we are devolving into? What is behind it? It seems that thugs are inspiring far too many willfully ignorant people. In turn, these folks feel the rule of law and the pursuit of civil society doesn’t apply to them. If you turn to aggression and threats, where do you think this is going end?
We all need to demand a higher level of accountability and integrity from ourselves and others.
Mark Lindberg,
Camrose

Learn facts

June 22, 2021

Thank you, Ed Rostaing, for your letter in the June 15 edition of The Booster. Finally some light on an issue which, so far, has generated mostly heat.  Your calm, measured voice is a welcome addition to the discussion of a horrible event which has gripped us all. You have reminded us to learn the facts before we draw conclusions and demonize everyone in sight. Let’s not get mired in blame instead of doing something about the inequities which still exist.  Thank you for calling upon our better selves to take over the process of healing our nation.
Peter LeBlanc,
Camrose

Technology challenges

June 22, 2021

Thank you, Arnold Malone, for your guest editorial on June 8 about technology. I recently tried to contact Service Canada regarding the tax withholding from my CCP.
After several phone calls where my wait time of 30 minutes extended to about 45 to 50 minutes (including one made at 8:30 a.m. when the office opened), I decided to go to the Service Canada office in Camrose.
The staff there was very helpful and, after watching them inputting my request for several minutes, I understood why I wasn’t able to do it online.
When the task was completed, I was informed that it would take three months for the changes to be reflected, but I could try calling!
Got to love technology.
Maralyn Shepley,
Camrose

Moving care

June 22, 2021

The moving of Galahad Care Centre residents to other area facilities in early June because of staff shortages came as a big shock to me. This facility has cared for many of our area’s residents, including some of my own family. These seniors have lived full lives and have contributed much to our communities. To move them out of their home with short notice and little explanation was devastating for residents and families.
Why did Alberta Health Services not inform the families and community of these staff shortages, which had apparently been ongoing for months, until the decision had already been made to move residents? Galahad Care Centre is located in a caring rural community. If people in the community had been made aware of the problem, they might have been able to help with finding a solution before it came to the crisis point of having to relocate residents. For example, I saw many of the positions available shared on Facebook after the moving of residents had been announced. Perhaps community organizations would have stepped up to offer recruitment incentives, like housing or transportation assistance.
It appears to me that perhaps the problem in finding staff is that many of the positions offered are part-time and with few benefits. To recruit and maintain a good core of staff, full-time permanent positions with benefits need to be available. Our residents deserve that.
Galahad Care Centre has consistently been one of the best continuing care facilities in the province. The family atmosphere created by caring staff, Auxiliary members and community volunteers is second to none. Alberta Health Services needs to give residents, their families, and the community a firm date as to when residents can move back home to Galahad Care Centre.
If you are concerned about this issue, I urge you to contact Leanne Grant, Alberta Health Services area director (Leanne.Grant@ahs.ca); Tyler Shandro, Minister of Health (healthminister@gov.ab.ca); Ms. Jackie Lovely, MLA Camrose (camrose@assembly.ab.ca).
John Oberg,
Forestburg

Working dinner

June 22, 2021

Shandro in obvious non-compliance with his own COVID-19 precaution rules.
Bravo! Hutchinson’s (June 8) Reflections nailed it when she wrote of minister Shandro’s non-compliance with the COVID-19 precautions, which he helped create…plus, he seems to feel he owes Albertans no apology.
Airdrie-East MLA Angela Pitt rightfully asks, “Why, if Kenney’s party can ignore restrictions, should restaurant owners not get more leeway as well?” She adds, “Much of the public concern about this incident has been about the hypocrisy of senior officials breaking their own rules.”
Minister Shandro (backed by Kenney) is violating the COVID-19 social-distancing rules and the fines they both helped establish. Surely the health minister should provide a role model for Albertans.
I applaud the teenager who contacted Alberta at Noon asking how much these political officials will be fined. I would add that it must be the maximum fine. Kenney was quick to assure Albertans that the diners had all paid for their own dinners…but, Albertans want to be sure that the tab for this “dinner and beverages” doesn’t show up on the various expense accounts. Taxpayers must not pay for this Sky Palace misadventure.
This dinner is not the real issue. This compliance-breaking dinner is simply a symbol of all that Shandro has done wrong from day one. That list of wrongs is endless, beginning back when minister Shandro publicly yelled at a fellow doctor who dared suggest a “conflict of interest” for a health minister to be co-owner with a wife running a private health care related business (i.e. Vital Partners). It runs the gamut from his February 2020 ripping-up of the seven-year Doctors’ Contract, which caused some doctors to leave Alberta (exact numbers are debatable), right through the inept handling of Covid’s tracing, testing and lame vaccination roll-outs. (i.e. Why were teachers, major frontline workers, not vaccinated right at the beginning?) The repeated closures and re-openings of schools (with no science-based evidence) created a risky environment for students/parents, teachers, school and custodial staff, bus drivers, etc.). And to cap it all off, Shandro is going along with the (insane) promotion of the Calgary Stampede, despite the risks of it being a super-spreader, as numerous variants (e.g. 60 per cent variants) are now responsible for new cases in parts of the UK.
After all these missteps, this Sky Palace dinner is just the “straw that broke the Shandro camel’s back”. Disappointed and appalled.
Marion Leithead, Bawlf

Fine dining

June 15, 2021

I was gob-stopped to read about our “Covid rule-breaking Premier” Jason Kenney apparently dining out on the patio of the Sky Palace with his team.
UCP MLA and deputy speaker Angela Pitt gets it right in her statement, “Legislature member says Alberta premier’s patio dinner clearly broke COVID-19 rules” (msn.com).
It seems obvious to me, and others, that Kenney broke Covid rules.
It is, in my opinion, a gross indicator of the entitlement and arrogance of this Premier and his team.
I agree wholeheartedly with Angela Pitt, “Much of the public concern about this incident has been about the hypocrisy of senior officials breaking their own rules.”
Brian McGaffigan,
Strome

No knowledge

June 15, 2021

I have just read Mark Lindberg and Lorne Vanderwoude’s comments in this past week’s Camrose Booster and I agree with every word. I graduated in 1980 from Hay Lakes High School, and throughout my high school years, not one word of abduction or kidnapping of Indigenous children was ever mentioned in any Social Studies class or any other class. We learned about Plains Indians, but that was it. I’m embarrassed by the lack of knowledge and information we as Canadians and Albertans have when it comes to the abduction and murder of so many Indigenous children. First to blame is the federal government. They built the schools and organized the abduction of the children. They needed someone to run the schools, so they recruited the all religious sects, but mainly the Catholic Church. I’m so embarrassed, and I actually feel stupid because none of us knew. Here is the kicker, the federal government knew, the provincial government, the municipal government knew and, most importantly, the Catholic Church knew. The government may have built these schools, but the Catholic Church ran them. The abuse and atrocities these kids faced at the hands of so-called religious teachers is…well I don’t have words for it. What I want from our Catholic and religious community right now, in these trying times, is to question your priests and religious leaders with extremely difficult and uncomfortable questions and don’t stop until you get the answers to everyone’s question…why?
Barry Tober,
Camrose

Not sure

June 15, 2021

I do not share the opinion Lorne Vanderwoude expressed in his letter to the editor in last week’s Booster. His Just Sayin’ letter alludes to a massive coverup of deaths of Indigenous children at the Kamloops Residential School. He suggests to Booster readers the likelihood of unmarked graves of native children at hundreds of other schools in Canada. He asks why these children’s deaths were not revealed years ago. Why such a massive cover up? He plants the seed of  widespread “foul play”.
Much work and money has already been invested in learning more about the benefits and atrocities of residential schools across Canada. Compensation for wrongdoings has been previously paid by government, on behalf of taxpayers.
I have employed a number of Indigenous people in my career, part of which was in Kamloops. I knew many other Indigenous people. Some told me they did not like the residential schools. Many had children attending from faraway places so that the children couldn’t run home. Most, however,  were grateful that their kids could get quality education.
Citizens of Kamloops were well aware of the massive unmarked cemetery containing bodies of children from the school. It operated from 1890 to 1960. At its peak in the ’50s, 500 students attended. Media is not currently reporting, with complete accuracy, the entire story of this site. It took some 50 to 70 years of burials in side-by-side graves to reach that 215 number now circulating world-wide. Conspiracy theories of priests and teachers murdering and secretly burying are rampant.
We mustn’t forget that tuberculosis was a major disease in the province, and it didn’t spare children. From the 1890s to the 1950s, it took many lives. The 1914-18 Spanish Flu killed a disproportionate number of Indigenous children. Even ordinary influenza was deadly for the Indigenous. Other diseases that aren’t common today–whooping cough, smallpox, meningitis and measles–took lives. It seems to me that Indigenous people didn’t have the immune system to fight off diseases well. Infected children entered schools and infected others. Many died.
I agree that there are many forgotten cemeteries in Canada. It’s likely that the reality of many diseases without cures of the day are responsible for countless deaths. Between Heisler and Strome, when there was an actual Spring Lake, Father Beillevaire and Father Lacombe are reported to have laid 74 Indigenous people to rest. 
The Kamloops discovery is a reflection of history. We have to be more cautious about turning this situation into something it may not actually be.

Mass grave

June 8, 2021

There is talk about finding a mass grave at a residential school in Kamloops, British Columbia.  Around 215 decomposed bodies of native children were found in unmarked graves on this property.  This was after this school was closed down decades ago.
I find this cover-up to be very disturbing, because this brings to light one question which needs to be asked. How many of the hundreds of residential schools also have unmarked graves of native children?
The question is why was this not dealt with years ago? Why was this covered up?
I understand that due to the attitudes of that period, that these people needed to be made into proper European citizens. However, why were these children’s deaths covered up? Where they all murdered? Was there foul play? 
I understand that bad things happened to people who were looked down on by the invaders, who were the Europeans; however, why was there a cover up?  Why has it taken this long to find out what happened to these missing children?  From my perspective, were there enough complaints of children going missing? Why were these complaints ignored? This is just something for all of you to ponder.
Lorne Vanderwoude,
Camrose

Speaking plainly

June 8, 2021

On Monday, May 31, the City of Camrose Facebook page said, “The City of Camrose will be lowering its flags on Monday, May 31, 2021, to honour and recognize the passing of the 215 Indigenous children buried at the Kamloops Residential School.”
Using indirect language, when speaking about the legacy of residential schools in Canada, minimalizes what Indigenous people endured and still endure to this day. It makes it sound like these people may have died from illness.
The neglect and outright sadistic violence against these children is murder. These kids didn’t pass away, they were killed.
Mark Lindberg,
Camrose

Recycling bottles

June 1, 2021

Being a volunteer at a recent bottle drive prompted me to write this letter.
On two occasions, we were asked where we were going to take the bottles and cans when our drive was over. Our reply was Camrose, of course.
The point being: they were not prepared to donate if we were not taking them to our Camrose venue.
This also brought to mind a couple of situations which are quite disturbing to me. Over the past few years, when the arena was fully operational, an out-of-town depot truck parked in the arena parking lot and collected bags and bags of bottles and cans. Living in the arena area, I witnessed this on a weekly basis for quite some time, especially during the winter months.
All milk products, including jugs, cartons, creamers and whipping cream, have a deposit on them and are therefore returnable to the bottle depot for cash.
As many families are struggling financially during this difficult time, I’m sure an additional revenue, whether it be large or small, would be welcome.
Unfortunately, any deposit items that are left at recycling depots have been rerouted out of our community.
The citizens of Camrose and many of the charitable organizations have donated to the operators of the recycling depot in many forms for many years and no doubt we will continue to do so.
We’ve heard on the news over and over again that we should support our local business. Local helps local!
Agnes Minnes,
Camrose

Little interest

June 1, 2021

​The latest issue of the Alberta Views magazine has a revealing statement about our MLA. In the article on Camrose, beginning on page 58, we learn of the protestors who have been outside our MLA’s office on Friday afternoons. The MLA’s choice of the word “picketers” is interesting, given that there is no sense in which a picket line exists that others would be ill-advised to cross. She also uses the dog whistle term “socialist” in her description, although I’m sure she’s aware that the protestors are asking about the social programs that her government is doing its best to decimate in this province.
Anyway, here is the problem. From the article:
“When asked by Alberta Views for a short interview about what she loves and is most concerned about in her constituency, MLA Lovely–who in December 2020 was given the Alberta Legislature award for “best community outreach,” as voted on by MLAs–did not respond (my italics).”
Apart from the major irony found in this quotation, I am dismayed that our MLA would not be willing to identify what she finds valuable and attractive about our community.
My own experience is relevant here. In an email, I asked our MLA what she felt about the fact that her government had made a drastically disproportionate reduction of funds to the University of Alberta, as compared to the other post-secondary institutions in the province. This was my question:
“Given that a vital part of your constituency, the Augustana Faculty, has been drastically affected, I’m wondering what you personally feel about these cuts? Do you feel they are fair? How do you justify the disproportionate nature of them? How also do you explain that so-called religious post-secondary institutions have received no, or virtually no, cuts?”
A month later, I received a reply that was filled with the usual UCP talking points, but had little to no personal response from our MLA. It contained the word “we” but nowhere did the word “I” appear. There was nothing in the way of a personal comment on the fact that people had been laid off at Augustana, nor any indication whether our MLA has any interest in advocating for Augustana’s best interests.
Others in the community have also reported a similar lack of engagement. The fact that our MLA ignored the request for an interview seems to speak volumes about our MLA’s priorities. Certainly, these do not appear to include engaging with those who might have hard questions, apart from responding with talking points.
Tim Parker,
Camrose

Folk myths

May 25, 2021

​Readers are probably tired of seeing my name on the Just Sayin’ page, so I will try to keep my comments brief. However, I do feel the need to challenge folk myths presented in public media as unquestioned truth. In her May 18, 2021 letter, Tina Kawalilak makes the following plea after proposing a list of unfounded claims: “Do people really not care, or why is it that they do not research things for themselves?”
I assume that Ms. Kawalilak did that research herself before writing her letter. So, if Ms. Kawalilak could assemble the research underlying just some of her claims, I am willing to pay for an ad to publish her evidence in The Booster. For example, some proofs for the following would be helpful: Melinda and Bill Gates have everything to do with eugenics. The reason we now see so many cases of autism and maybe asthma are from bad vaccines. Mainstream media is paid off. Climate change is a hoax. Millions disappear every year.
Etc. ad absurdum. Of course, if any other readers would care to join me in funding the ad, that would be most welcome  And, please, Ms. Kawalilak, don’t use this offer as proof that the mainstream media is paid off.
Peter LeBlanc,
Camrose

Not clear

May 25, 2021

As an ardent follower of politics, I have (for the past 16 months) endured the never-ending COVID-19 updates on television, hoping for a clearer picture of where we are and what lies ahead in regard to solving the dilemma. It seems fair to say that no clear road-map has been established by our top medical and political authorities for us to follow.
Therefore, I can understand the frustration that many are feeling, (and some of us) expressing or venting in the Just Sayin’ section.
What I don’t understand is all the harsh criticisms directed at the UPC Premier, while none is directed at the federal Liberals for their late and misguided response. I have a thorough documentation of their numerous failings since the onset, which I may submit at another time for the benefit of those who haven’t had the time or the inclination to follow the saga.
If, as we were told, vaccinations are the only hope to eliminate the devastation caused by the virus(s), then the blame clearly belongs with the federal government for their late reaction and blind trust in the WHO recommendations, which proved unreliable. At the onset, Dr. Tam told us, “Canada was not in any danger…if we incur any infections…I assure you there will be very few.”
They were so certain of this, Canada shipped our supplies to China to aid them, leaving Canadians vulnerable, and failed to close the borders to foreign travellers, as urged by the Conservatives.
As for the missteps by the UCP, in hindsight, there were a few, perhaps many, but in a democracy, all voices should be heard in order to establish a consensus, and there was no clear one. Not within the ranks of the UCP, not within a polling of Albertans.
The bulk of criticisms against Alberta’s apparent attempt to follow (federal recommendations modified to suit Alberta situation) were inconsistent, much too restrictive, not restrictive enough, not enforced, too late, not equitably applied.
When some business can stay open and others can’t, there are resulting beneficiaries and losers. When we try to please everyone, often no one is pleased. Who of us would want to be shouldered with this responsibility?
We are told “we are all in this together”, but we are not. However, we could try to move forward supporting and understanding each other. We do have different needs.
Bill Mattinson,
Camrose

Volunteers

May 11, 2021

Nicely said, Colleen Nelson. A well-deserved tribute to all the volunteers who keep not only the Bailey Theatre open, but many other facilities and events throughout the community, and indeed the whole province. And that’s in addition to what they are contributing to our way of life through their full-time jobs. What a gift to us all.
Peter LeBlanc,
Camrose

Goodbye Dad

May 11, 2021

Editor’s note: We normally do not publish letters from outside our coverage area, however, there is a good message here for all of us: all of us need to take this COVID-19 business very seriously.

Dear Blain and Ron:
You never dream this could happen to you…I am one of seven (six now) siblings and during COVID, we have a Sunday morning Zoom call for all the Prevost clan and we have a great time, teasing each other and connecting.
One of the comments we use to make is, “Thank God no one in our family got this disease.” It was always out there and didn’t affect us…it was someone else’s disease. My younger brother Ken succumbed to COVID-19.
He was living in Ottawa and he began exhibiting symptoms. He was tested, found out he had the virus, and so did my sister-in-law and my niece. For some reason, they had a milder version of the disease.
My brother began exhibiting symptoms of shortness of breath and was immediately hospitalized. He was also determined to have pneumonia.
Prior to this, he was in excellent health, he meditated regularly, did tai chi and walked an hour a day.
I am particularly sad and filled with grief because we chatted three to four times a week about his different projects since we were both speakers and trainers, often sharing ideas and concepts.
He and I began our entrepreneurial path together when we opened a retail store in Ottawa in the late ’70s. I never dreamt that our family would be touched by this scourge, and the unfairness of this is hard to comprehend.
Here we are, one year into this pandemic, and he had just got his first vaccine and this happens to him.
I leave you with this. Never assume anything. Life is fragile and, for Heaven’s sake, take this virus seriously, and abide by the rules. If you are an anti-vaxxer…need I say more. Here is the text sent by my niece (his daughter).
“We said goodbye to my dad today. It was so relaxing and peaceful to see him. I missed him so much. Seeing him was so, so good. I felt the most calm I have felt in days. Mom and I were called into the hospital urgently and we saw him for two hours. Which is unheard of. It was lovely. I said everything I could ever want to say. My brothers spoke to him over the phone and made their peace. He for sure had two big tears flowing down his face. We held his hands. Rubbed his head. Put my hand on his heart. We sang ‘You Are My Sunshine’, listened to music and sang along, just relaxed. There was a thunderstorm and then the sun came out. The doctors said, he will pass tonight. It was the most graceful exit we could have imagined.”
Hug your family.
Roy Prevost,
Burnaby, BC

Flip-flops

May 11, 2021

On Wednesday, April 28, Premier Jason Kenney said that health measures don’t work to reduce the spread of COVID-19. On Thursday, April 29, the Premier instituted new health measures in closing schools. Yet another flip-flop from the Premier. Another feckless attempt to reduce infection rates. Yet we in Alberta had the highest per capita rate of active cases in Canada, and higher than every American state after Michigan.
No, I don’t think it’s because we need the government to lock us all in our homes and tell us when to come out. However, I do think we need responsible leadership, that acts quickly and decisively, to health care needs based on science. Unfortunately, that isn’t happening. It appears that our Premier is trying to play both sides of this issue, so he can win–politically. He reacts timidly and slowly, because a third of his MLAs, people he picked for his team, feel even with the new COVID-19 variants, we should relax restrictions. We should ignore science. Insofar as I can tell, this is ideology founded on some notion of Libertarianism. He says he’s taking a measured approach, but isn’t he just making this all much worse? His weak-kneed measures don’t go far enough to curb the spread of the virus, but they do lead to more business strife, pandemic burnout, and infections. Ultimately, they lead to more sickness and deaths.
If we went into a strict lockdown and embraced vaccinations, we’d be well onto the other side of this by now. Look at the example of New Zealand. Instead, our Premier, frightened of the extremists in his own party, tries to play both sides of the issue. He creates confusion and we all suffer for it.
Kenney still thinks the conservatives in this province are “united”. They aren’t. They never were. This crisis shows everyone that, and it shows it clearly. Kenney somehow thinks he’ll appease both responsible Albertans and reckless anti-maskers in the political dreamland he’s living in. The trouble is he’s dragging this entire province down with him. It’s time we make it clear he needs to stand up and take restrictions seriously. No more flip-flops.
Mark Lindberg,
Camrose

Selfish people

May 11, 2021

Something is really bothering me. I have sincere remorse for those who do not have jobs, the closed restaurants, the limited family togetherness. Those people are among the heroes of this unusual traumatic time.
This time, I am angry and also writing to those people who say that their rights have been infringed. As you continue to circumvent the COVID-19 protocols, you are taking and delaying my right of freedom.
You dare to spread the contagious virus with your continuous gatherings in the streets, in parks, at indoor parties, at church, and in any unnecessary close relationship with others. It causes more disease and possibly death. You are guilty of extending my loss of freedom.
On the subject of freedom, death takes away total freedom, it is absolute. Why do you complain about your living freedoms?
Lew Goddard,
Camrose

Out of Alberta

May 11, 2021

I can now state with conviction, and the passing of 30 days, the above three words soothe my mind.
My decision to leave Alberta, and the unimagined angst in doing so, was not an experience taken lightly nor soon to be forgotten. Although a decision in the making for at least two years, it was not an easy one. After all, Alberta has been “home” for 54 of my 75 years. A multitude of experiences contributed to my departure;  some weighed more heavily than others, some simply heartbreaking.
The COVID-19 situation shattered lives world-wide and what had been accepted as “normal life” became the “new reality”, drastically shifting with the dawning of each new day. Regretfully, I have left some amazing people behind: some dear friends and others, new acquaintances. This later-in-life event would have been even more difficult had it not been for the understanding and encouragement of so many individuals.  Each will remain close in mind and heart. I faced deteriorating health, and my lifetime with horses drew to an end. There was much to be done, little time to do such.
Thankfully, there were positives: one being that I was fortunate to connect with a Camrose business, Worthmore Trailers. Following a frantic search for a specific sized cargo trailer to transport my possessions, Wade Worthing came through with brilliance, enabling me to purchase the exact cargo trailer required. His sharp business sense, courtesy, timeliness and integrity are qualities I admire and will remember and appreciate. Thank you, Wade. I wish you continuing success.
My initial thought, and prime reason for vacating Alberta is attributed to the miserable misery of the UCP government and its self-absorbed, utterly pretentious and repetitious flip-flop gross failings, all at Albertans’ expense. I had recently noticed the increase in the number and tone of letters submitted by readers of and printed by The Booster. The very words of those intolerant of the constant overflow of UCP indiscretions, stupidity, waffling and back-peddling were gathering steam. Not only were there expressions of frustrations and disappointments, anger was evidently simmering. Justly so. It was time.
Lennie McKim,
formerly of Beaver County

Asian month

May 11, 2021

Happy Asian Heritage Month (AHM). This month highlights the contributions that Asians, South Asians, Southeast Asians and Pacific Islanders have made in Canada.
I’m third generation Chinese Canadian. I’ve lived in Camrose for over half my life, raised three amazing children, worked in education and as a therapy assistant. I’ve volunteered for many local organizations.
It’s sad, knowing that the incidence of hate crimes against Asians has increased 600 to 700 per cent in some Canadian urban areas since the beginning of the pandemic. Racism against Asian Canadians can be anything from refusing service, verbal abuse, being spit upon and physical violence. Victims have been from all ages. I’m fortunate that my experience of racism in Camrose has been minimal. Other Asians in our community have not been as lucky. My parents taught me, “Don’t make a fuss, walk away.”
But “keeping silent” isn’t helpful. It supports the illusion that there isn’t racism. When I don’t speak out, I give permission for racism to continue. Silence sets up Asians as easy targets, because they won’t do anything back. Instead, be informed about how to use helpful bystander intervention, https://www.ihollaback.org/bystander-resources/.
I encourage Camrose to think of Asians you know. See the similarities to yourselves, and celebrate the differences. The Asians in our community are from all walks of life, we are someone’s family member, colleague, and friend. If you witness racism, speak up, and stop it. Let’s work together during AHM to reduce racism and make Camrose safe for all.
Donna Hackborn, Camrose

Bad leaders

May 11, 2021

As a former resident of Camrose and longtime Conservative supporter of the Lougheed and Getty governments, I am sick and tired of watching the ignorance being displayed by these phoney Conservatives. Lougheed’s energy minister Bill Dickie was a brother-in-law of one of my uncles.
These are Reformers, trying to pretend they are Conservatives, and they don’t care who they hurt or what lives are lost.
While Jason Kenney is at least trying to get Albertans to obey the rules, his ignorant MLAs find it smart to ignore them, and he isn’t man enough to stop them.
While his health minister tries to run off our rural doctors so that they can close down your health care services, his energy minister is willing to allow our water supply to be polluted by coal production and they don’t care.
While these MLAs encourage businesses to remain open when our governments are supplying funding to assist them for being closed is just plain stupid. Are they just too lazy to apply, and why  aren’t these MLAs helping them?
Add that to their policy of slashing taxes to benefit their rich friends while they cut our children’s health care and education jobs is just one more example of ignorance they provide.
Their only mandate has been to finish off what Ralph Klein started by destroying everything Lougheed created.
The true Conservatives in my world aren’t surprised that Alberta is running one of the worse covid records per capita in North America and we know who to blame.
We also know none of this would be happening under the watch of our Conservative hero Peter Lougheed.
Alan K . Spiller,
formerly of Camrose

Café patios

May 4, 2021

I want to express my excitement and support of the City looking into permanent sidewalk cafés and patios downtown. Camrose has a beautiful downtown area, and I am lucky to live within walking distance.
Having more outdoor spaces available for business would be an excellent way to liven up the street and bring in more people throughout the summer. I realize that parking will be on many people’s minds as patios will remove some parking spots. Our downtown area has many parking spaces available just off Main Street, including Founders’ Park and the public parking behind the post office, and the two expansive lots at the north end. For myself, an able-bodied young man, parking in these areas and walking are very feasible.
To compensate for the loss of closer parking spots that are critical for people with mobility issues, there could be a certain number of parking spots converted into handicap spots for every regular parking spot lost to a patio. It should also be kept in mind that most Main Street businesses are narrow and would likely only remove four or five parking spots for a patio. In the end, patios on Main Street will offer businesses new ways to increase their capacity during COVID, and draw in more people in the future when restrictions are lifted. This new flexibility with Downtown’s social spaces will create a space that reflects the kinds of business in the area and adds to Downtown’s beauty. For those still concerned about parking, if we lose more Downtown businesses, what will the ample parking be good for? Keeping business on Main Street should be our first concern.    
Chad O. Mailer,
Camrose

Be safe

May 4, 2021

There seems to be a lot of confusion when it comes to this virus. First of all, this virus is real. It is highly infectious, and it seems to have a mortality rate of around three or four per cent.  Now this may have increased over the past year, however, I am not a medical expert, so I am not too sure on that at all.  Second of all, there seems to be confusion with it’s name. Coronavirus is a family of viruses that includes the common cold, seasonal flu, MERS and SARS. WHO has given this strain of coronavirus the acronym COVID-19 for “coronavirus disease 2019”. The actual name is really SARS-Cov-2, although that is seldom used by the press.
Millions of people around the world are dying and will die from this strain. Pandemics are not a new thing to this planet. In the 14th century, the black plague killed 30 to 60 per cent of the population of Europe. In 1918, the Spanish Flu, which was another coronavirus, killed 50 to 100 million people worldwide.
We do have a better understanding on how diseases operate. Way back in the early 1900s, doctors were not aware of what germs were. So, I do encourage everyone to hang on and work on keeping everyone safe. Wearing masks and getting your vaccine are just a few of the ways we can beat this awful disease together. I do encourage everyone to just hang in there just a little bit longer. Together, we can win this fight.
Lorne Vanderwoude,
Camrose

Wake up

May 4, 2021

Nero danced and played his violin while Rome was burning down. So get out your violins and start playing. The United States is on fire and burning down with riots, looting and burning of stores in a lot of their cities.
Crime and shootings are on the rise, their answer is to defund the police? Hundreds of thousands of people are crossing its southern border in the middle of COVID, with Americans out of work and living on the streets.
Prime Minister Trudeau is dancing and going down the same road. The Washington Post and Fox News have reported that tens of thousands of these people have been moved by plane to border processing points on the Canadian border, so they can cross into Canada. Trudeau has said in the next eight months, he would like to bring 400,000 new immigrants into Canada.
We already have 37,000, who jumped the border before COVID. The US is not a third world country yet. They have them, they can keep them.
That is their problem, not ours.
There is a proper way to come to Canada, and some have waited for years. We are in the middle of COVID. Unemployment is high; companies, business, restaurants and stores are closing.
We have Canadians living in parks and on the street. We cannot look after our own people. Racism is a word that has lost its power. When you heard it being used, you listened. Now it is used way too often, and for anything without any proof.
It is like the boy who was always crying wolf, and when the wolf came, no one would listen.
Cancel culture, dangerous awakening, political correctness. You are witnessing a growing movement in America to silence opposing majority voices by social media mobs.
Inflation is on the rise, carbon tax, high fuel costs and all costs are going up. Everything you buy is covered in throw-away plastic. Trudeau’s answer is to ban bags and straws.
He should have put higher tariffs on any imports into Canada that have plastic. Cell phones and computers are the biggest polluters now.
Camrose property taxes are too high, and they tell us they didn’t raise taxes in 2020 and 2021. But, they raise the cost of all services, so what is the difference? We are still paying more.
Glenn Dunn,
Camrose

Save nature

April 27, 2021

In the past several months, I’ve been terribly consumed by the pending devastation in the eastern slopes of our gorgeous Rocky Mountains.
I’ve been so consumed that I have neglected to tell Camrosians how lucky I feel to be living here in Camrose for my 10th year now. How many times have I stopped in wonder of the beauty and serenity of the paths in our marvellous little valley. In winter, stopping on the concrete path to watch deer lock horns on the slopes below the cemetery. Or, while on a backpacking training walk on the now snow-free trails, I stop and let my eye graze along the creek…opposite slope and trail…and hear the voices of others walking these trails. How lucky am I…are we. So, thank you Camrose City council, and thank you, Camrosians, for the privilege of touching nature so close to home.
Marv Miniely,
Camrose

Great city

April 27, 2021

Preserving and promoting the uniqueness of our city is important. We enjoyed the efforts put into ice sculptures and beautifying trees this past winter. For the summer months, we’d like to see the rejuvenation of the downtown core to promote vitality and tourism–much like a mini Jaywalkers’.
By temporarily closing a block or two to cars, people would be drawn to the core to go for a stroll, while shopping and allowing for social distancing, supporting businesses with low capacity limits due to restrictions, and following public health measures to allow for outside cafés and vendors.
Canmore had a trial run like this last summer with great success. Having heard on a radio station that the Camrose Regional Exhibition is willing to provide support with materials and personnel, this would be a great way of bridging the challenging period in which we find ourselves, supporting each other and encouraging in-street patio infrastructure.
Verna Hinch,
Camrose

Coal mines

April 27, 2021

I would like to express my profound disappointment with regards to the terms of reference for the Coal Consultation Committee as stated here: https://www.alberta.ca/assets/documents/coal-policy-committee-terms-of-reference.pdf.
To limit the committee’s discussion and fact finding to concerns under the ministry of energy means that nothing from the Land Stewardship Act and the Water Act will be on the table for consideration. To exclude the issue of water, to exclude the issue of biodiversity, to exclude the issue of land use, limits the perspective and the view the committee will be able to take.
There is a majority of Albertans from all political stripes, walks of life, both urban and rural, age, gender, religion, and ethnic background who are against coal mining in the Rockies for the simple fact that it endangers the clean water supply for Albertans, and for people across the Prairies, not to mention Montana.
Alberta is in cycles of drought, and to use our water to clean coal not only threatens the quality of water, but also the quantity available. There is no known process that can filter the water from heavy metal contamination.
The water in all the major rivers in Alberta will be polluted for centuries. And once the coal companies close the mines, Albertans will be left with the mess. Like the orphan wells, we will be faced with orphan mines. The waste piles that are left at the mine sites will also be a source of constant water and air pollution. Human life (including ranchers, farmers, tourism economy, and anyone who depends on water and air–all Albertans) as well as wildlife and flora will suffer.
Alberta has so little to gain (jobs for a short limited time) and much to lose (clean water and air, biodiversity, jobs in ranching/agriculture, tourism/ecotourism...)
Also, why allow continued mining exploration in the Eastern Slopes when consultation has barely started? Exploration activities have disrupted forest environments with the road building, clearing, drilling and introduction of all the heavy machinery involved.
I am at a loss as to how and why this government and this ministry can departmentalize the coal discussion without discussing water issues and land stewardship issues. I am disappointed in the minister of environment and parks that he has not pushed that his portfolio also be represented in this discussion. I have very little faith in the AER’s ability to determine what is safe for Alberta’s environment.
Donna Hackborn,
Camrose

Dream police

April 27, 2021

Police in Ontario say they won’t conduct random spot checks despite new powers.
Jackie Lovely, I read with great interest the concern being expressed by various police forces in Ontario regarding the latest COVID enforcement orders given to the various police forces of that province.
Fortunately, the response has been very negative. The president of the Peel Regional Police Association also took to Twitter to urge the government, “Don’t make cops the bad guys here.” The London Police Services board says it has “serious concerns” about whether the provincial government’s expanded police powers are even constitutional.
As you are aware the Alberta government/federal government is making the RCMP and other cops the bad guys when it comes to enforcing AHS directed closures of various facilities? The above quotes indicate boundaries that are being extended in Ontario contrary to police opinion. I believe the same concerns are being spoken of by many citizens of Alberta.
Further, I was very disappointed to read your government propaganda letter against the decision of BRSD to walk back from the revised education curriculum. Going up against locally elected officials (BRSD) so directly and publicly indicates to me your utter disregard for local political leaders and their locally informed professionals, both of whom have the interests of the children under their jurisdiction at heart.
Brian McGaffigan,
Strome

Inappropriate teaching

April 20, 2021

As I write this letter on Friday morning, April 16, I am relieved to know that 24 school boards across our province have announced they are not proceeding with the latest draft curriculum. While some of them have used the very reasonable explanation that piloting anything next year is too much to ask of teachers right now, many have also pointed to serious flaws throughout the whole document.
As well, the Alberta Teachers’ Association and the Alberta Music Advocacy Alliance, (a group of 10 professional music and music teaching organizations) have both just released statements stating that the curriculum is inappropriate, insufficient, too biased and filled with errors.
I am glad to see this public outcry is having some impact, and I see the same is happening regarding coal mining in the Eastern Slopes: Albertans are rightly pointing out to the Alberta government that they have not consulted either Albertans nor experts. The way in which they reinstated the former Coal Policy (also after public outcry) was insufficient; exploration continues to damage the mountainsides and potentially the watersheds, and implies that companies expect to proceed. I only hope a private member’s bill put forth to halt all exploration until proper consultation is completed can be successful in this sitting of the legislature.
Given some of her published articles and received email responses, I am concerned that our local MLA is focussed on cheerleading her government and perhaps not listening to or advocating for the concerns of her constituents and all Albertans. I also feel disheartened that letters directed to her and to ministers are often responded to with cut-and-paste replies that repeat the party line verbatim. Is that because so many people are writing in with the same concern?
Today I am feeling grateful for the many Albertans, of all political stripes, who have decided they want a government that makes decisions based on feedback and best practice, full information and competent research. There are ways to implement policy changes with wisdom and empathy no matter which side of the political spectrum a government is on. Let’s hope this government can make a u-turn and start standing up for the best interests of all of us who call Alberta home.
Joy-Anne Murphy,
Camrose

Community support

April 20, 2021

I just wanted to say thank you for the front page exposure. I had no idea where that picture was going to end up. Thank you to The Camrose Booster for supporting our community and all the small businesses. It is so greatly appreciated.
Also, you totally got me on the April Fool’s edition.  I had my kids so excited for ice fishing and boating. My daughter, who is a fan of pranks, thought it was hilarious that the newspaper would pull a massive prank on the whole city.  Good job.
 Jane Beck,
Camrose

UCP economics

April 20, 2021

A bear is only worth something after it’s turned into a rug.
A tree is only worth something once logged.
A landscape…mined.
There is no such thing as the value of a functioning ecosystem in a UCP mindset. One wonders if they realize that water comes from the environment and not out of a tap.
It’s not we don’t need resources, we do–however, politicians need to understand there are things that once lost, can never return. When that happens, the cost is too high. If we give up water quality for people, farmers, ranchers, and wildlife, will the revenues from coal mining make up for the loss? Not a chance.
Mark Lindberg,
Camrose

Volunteer week

April 20, 2021

April 18 to 24 is National Volunteer Week with the theme “The Value of One, the Power of Many”. Volunteers are key to so many organizations in our community. I’m glad that we can take time to focus on them and show them our appreciation.
There are over 100 volunteers associated with The Bailey Theatre. They are a committed bunch of people, with a wide variety of skills. One thing they have in common is their devotion to the theatre.
We’re so grateful for the group of volunteers who cleaned the theatre and did maintenance jobs while we were closed. Thank you to all the volunteers who were involved with our fundraisers: the Bottle Drive and the Flea Market. We’re also thankful to volunteers who worked behind the scenes maintaining our scrapbook of Bailey News, who decorated the theatre, who kept our books and who did our marketing. Thank you to volunteers who helped with events during the two months when we were able to have live events at the theatre.
The Bailey Theatre Society has a hard working, dedicated board of directors. The hours that they worked this year increased considerably from past years, as they made difficult decisions and were creative with plans for a new future. Thank you for your commitment, grant writing, and vision.
The Bailey Theatre could not have made it through this year without our volunteers. They are the lifeblood of our organization. Thank you for keeping yourselves healthy and safe so that you will be able to be involved again. We need to care for ourselves before we can care for others. We salute our volunteers this week. We aren’t able to bring in “stars”, but “You are the Stars.” Thank you all for volunteering with the Bailey Theatre.
Colleen Nelson,
Volunteer Coordinator
Bailey Theatre Society

April Fool’s

April 13, 2021

Compliments to The Camrose Booster staff and reporters for the great job you are doing. The April Fool’s article on draining Mirror Lake and the Wetaskiwin Water Tower removal a couple of years back were bang-up jobs and sucked many of us in.
Booster Banter is always a fun read, and the column by Arnold Malone on Toes this week was both educational and hilarious–been there, done that. Great job everyone.
Glen Winder,
Camrose County

Waste management

April 13, 2021

It seems to me the phrase “out of sight, out of mind” is the operating mantra for too many businesses.
Corporations get the apparent unfettered right to produce disposable items that ultimately end up in landfills, or walk away from well sites. Stuff like plastic that isn’t going to break down for hundreds of years. The cry of businesses is they are “supplying demand” or “providing jobs”, when what they really mean is “look the other way”. They don’t think they need to be accountable for the impact to the environment. All that waste that leeches into the water we drink becomes the problem of municipalities, though we don’t yet know the true cost of plastic contamination in drinking water to human and ecological health. They tritely say, “That’s the cost of business.”
It appears the UCP is in lock step with this mindset. Presently, the UCP is trying to sneak through six mining projects approved in between the elimination of the 1976 Coal Agreement and its recent reinstatement of that policy. The UCP is hoping no one notices. Not only does this not make environmental sense, it doesn’t make economic sense either. Everyone is going to pay for this pollution and destruction: the tourism industry, forestry, hunters, farmers, ranchers, fishers, and each one of us through higher municipal costs of securing fresh water, all at a time when the UCP is cutting tax revenues to municipalities.
The UCP wants to check a box by saying, “We created more jobs”, but they’ve failed to do any real cost-benefit analysis as they blindly adhere to cutting red tape. They won’t create good jobs, and the damage will last past our children’s lifetimes. They just figure we’re going to say, “Oh, you created jobs”, and leave it at that. Out of sight, out of mind…it’s just the cost of business, so look the other way. Again.
Mark Lindberg,
Camrose

Bad dream

April 13, 2021

Is this province really going to proceed with mining in the eastern slopes? Is it really happening, or am I having a bad dream?
Let’s set aside most of the concerns, like visually destroying the beauty of the mountains, destruction of endangered tree species, loss of diversity of other plants and vegetation, destruction of habitat for several animal species, loss of insect and bird populations, air pollution, loss of jobs in general tourism and ecotourism, destructive impact on agriculture, use of huge amounts of water, sacrificing the eastern slopes for a dying industry, and more. Let’s think only about poisoning our water.
We will be pouring deadly amounts of selenium, arsenic, various nitrates and radon into the water that flows into all of the major river systems on the prairies. There is no point in blaming the mining companies or our present government. The people of Alberta are collectively responsible for what is happening.
If someone dumped 10,000 or 100,000 litres of a mixture of the chemicals noted above into Dried Meat Lake, would that be okay with Camrosians? Would we just sit by and say nothing or do nothing?
It is hard to believe that our elected representatives so arrogantly dismiss the scientific evidence as “misinformation”. They seem to believe that the majority they received in the last election entitles them to make decisions without consulting the people. We need to write to our MLAs and cabinet ministers. We need to sign petitions. We might need to take up peaceful, nonviolent civil disobedience. If Albertans allow mining in the eastern slopes, I have to wonder about our sanity.
Marvin Miniely, Camrose

Huge impact

April 13, 2021

COVID has had a disastrous impact on our economy, community health, increased death rates, compromised public education and our collective mental health. It has also exposed Canadians’ vulnerability in supply chain management and our self reliance for essential materiel like food, drugs, and other essential commodities.
As I started my career in pharmacology in the 1960s, Canada was a world leader in research and production of pharmaceuticals and biologicals. Over the last five decades, our pharmaceutical industry, functionally, has gone AWOL. Connaught Labs, established in 1914, was one of three global leaders for biologicals research, along with the Pasteur Institutes (France) and the Lister Institute (UK). So…what happened?
PM Brian Mulroney privatized Connaught Labs in the 1980s, which stripped Canada of its ability to produce its own vaccines. PM Mulroney (Bills C91, C22), coupled with signing NAFTA, prompted Canada’s ethical pharmaceutical industry (20-plus drug companies) to abandon Canada as a center of excellence for pharmaceutical R&D. The abandonment led to a loss of self reliance in drug supply, plus the loss of tens of thousands of high-tech jobs. The exodus was complete when PM Harper signed the CETA (EU) agreement. Hmmm!
Some select anecdotes to consider: (i) 0 per cent of our drugs are produced in China or offshore, (ii) the cost of insulin (original Connaught patent) has skyrocketed over the past two decades, (iii) he cost of drugs in Canada is the third highest of all OECD countries, (iv) anadian expenditures in R&D (all sciences) is the lowest of all G20 countries, (v) eneric drug use accounted for 76 per cent of the volume of drugs in the Canadian pharmaceutical market in 2018, the third highest retail market share among the OECD countries after US and Germany.
Christine Legard, president of the European Central Bank, has written extensively on the need for countries to develop post-COVID strategic plans. To date, no Canadian political leaders have revealed a platform to Make Canada Great Again with regard to production of drugs. Isn’t it timely for our political leaders to put aside their ideological partisanship, cooperate across the aisles of Parliament, and resurrect our generic and ethical pharmaceutical industry to serve our collective national best interests? Let your MP know your thoughts.
Lynn Clark,
Camrose

Need carbon 

April 6, 2021

Science has proven that plants need carbon dioxide to transfer nitrogen, oxygen and sun energy through photosynthesis to soil microbes that break down minerals and nutrients to feed plants.
The atmosphere contains about 78 per cent nitrogen by weight. An unhealthy plant has a problem trying to use this free nitrogen.
Are the chemical and fertilizer corporations pushing the carbon scare so they can sell more products to protect and feed unhealthy plants?
Why do we now have so many crop diseases and evergreens dying?
Is China purchasing our coal to burn and provide ample carbon for healthy plants?
Robert Snider,
New Norway

Good ship

April 6, 2021

Aboard the good ship HMS Canada, ship log 1955: Wonderful ship, state-of-the-art, world-leading scientists on board; leaders in agricultural research, plant genetics, biochemists, immunologists in cancer research centers, communications, pure/applied physics, rocketry, aviation, fisheries, pharmaceutics. HMS Canada is a land of plenty, agricultural crops, fisheries, mineral wealth, oil-gas-coal, forests.
Scientists are supported by a dedicated, hardworking and educated crew on board. Periodically, captains have been ably supported by competent first mates Lougheed, Romanow, Wells and others.
Ship is sailing smoothly and “on course” to a far-off destination.
Ship log: second decade of 21st century…ship is rudderless and adrift, lost power, winds and seas are threatening. Most scientists have “jumped ship” or been “thrown overboard” as unwanted ballast.
The bridge continues to argue whether the “pointy part” goes first or the “flat part” goes first. There is no agreement what the destination is or the best way to get there, and everyone is trying to get their hands on the tiller. The bridge has not mastered reading charts or compass or using GPS, or checking weather conditions for impending gales, etc. Collectively, they have sailed into the Bermuda Triangle.
Fiscally mismanaged sister ships like HMS Greece and Italy have veered off course, while others like HMS USSR have sunk. Newly launched ships HMS Israel, Jordan and India, using modern technology, have overtaken us.
The “wannabe” captains have not served an apprenticeship on modern, progressive ships like HMS Norway, Germany, Denmark, Suisse, Sweden, Kiwi, etc., nor have they visited progressive ports in Europe and Asia.
Simultaneously, they have not noticed that the aforementioned ships have adjusted their sails and altered course and have quietly sailed away.
Meanwhile, on the sun desk, thousands of complacent sunbathers, basking in the glow of self aggrandizement, not realizing the relatively small size of HMS Canada, and that it is adrift (and the hull is rusting).
It is time to stop blaming the current captain solely: several previous captains have had a very large hand sailing us into this Bermuda Triangle. At the next scheduled vote to change the bridge (2021? 2022?), make sure the new captain has the capability and the vision to get HMS Canada back on a charted course. Tell your local deckhand (MP, MLA) to share his/her vision to convince you.
Lynn Clark,
Camrose

Service clubs 

April 6, 2021

I am writing this letter in regards to the front page of The Camrose Booster on March 23 on Empathy for the Elks.
Does Mr. Czapp realize that they are not the only service club who has lost major revenue due to COVID-19? The Legion, Moose Lodge, Rotary, Swans and Roses Lions, Knights of Columbus, just to name a few.
These service clubs have all had their fundraisers cancelled. These service clubs have bills to pay too!
A service club has no greater joy than to give back to the community! This is no longer possible due to COVID-19.
In the picture, there should of been representatives for the many service clubs in Camrose standing on the steps with Mr. Czapp. We are all in this together. Service clubs included.
Judy Sturek,
Camrose

Editor’s note: This Camrose Booster photo/cover copy was not intended to raise the profile, or the serious repercussions of this pandemic, of any particular club, organization or business over the similar plight of another.
Over several publishing weeks, The Booster has profiled a variety of entities negatively affected by the COVID-19 era. We simply do not have the time or resources to tell the story of each and all. We sincerely believe most readers will understand that the goal of our reporting is to provide an overview of the entire business community, not specifically single out a single club such as the Elks Club featured on our March 23rd cover.

Fooled again

April 6, 2021

Curses. Foiled (I mean fooled) again. Why do I get sucked in every year by the plausibility of your front page year after year? Because they are so cleverly done. And this year’s was particularly sly. I know you will never divulge the brains behind the April foolery–it was surely a group effort. But you must submit it for a community newspaper publishing award. We are proud of our Camrose Booster.
Peter LeBlanc,
Camrose